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99

Probably you shouldn't :-) The second most obvious answer is you should use it if your data isn't relational. This usually manifests itself in having no easy way to describe your data as a set of columns. A good example is a database where you actually store paper documents, e.g. by scanning office mail. The data is the scanned PDF and you have some meta ...


95

I would say next-gen database, not next-gen SQL. SQL is a language for querying and manipulating relational databases. SQL is dictated by an international standard. While the standard is revised, it seems to always work within the relational database paradigm. Here are a few new data storage technologies that are getting attention currently: CouchDB is ...


87

Definitely Relational. Unlimited flexibility and expansion. Two corrections, both in concept and application, followed by an elevation. It is not "filtering out the un-needed data"; it is selecting only the needed data. Yes, of course, if you have an Index to support the columns identified in the WHERE clause, it is very fast, and the query does not ...


37

The main differences are the data model and the querying capabilities. Key-value stores The first type is very simple and probably doesn't need any further explanation. Data model: more than key-value stores Although there is some debate on the correct name for databases such as Cassandra, I'd like to call them column-family stores. Although key-value ...


33

CouchDB (from their website) A document database server, accessible via a RESTful JSON API. Generally, relational databases aren't simply accessed via REST services, but require a much more complex SQL API. Often these API's (JDBC, ODBC, etc.) are quite complex. REST is quite simple. Ad-hoc and schema-free with a flat address space. Relational ...


23

I'm missing graph databases in the answers so far. A graph or network of objects is common in programming and can be useful in databases as well. It can handle semi-structured and interconnected information in an efficient way. Among the areas where graph databases have gained a lot of interest are semantic web and bioinformatics. RDF was mentioned, and it ...


17

Hmm, not quite sure what your question is. In the title you ask about Databases, whereas in the body of your text you ask about Database Management Systems. The two are completely different and require different answers. A DBMS is a tool that allows you to access a DB. Other than the data itself, a DB is the concept of how that data is structured. So ...


16

For stupidly storing and serving other-servers-data. In the last couple of weeks I've been playing with a lifestream app that polls my feeds (delicious, flickr, github, twitter...) and stores them in couchdb. The beauty of couchdb is that it lets me keep the original data in its original structure with no overhead. I added a 'class' field to each document, ...


15

In my experience, the biggest difference is that non-relational datastores force you to model based on how you'll query, because of the lack of joins, and how you'll write, because of the transaction restrictions. This of course results in very denormalized models. After a while, I started to define all the queries first, to avoid having to rethink the ...


14

An admittedly obscure but interesting alternative to the types of databases mentioned here is the associative database, such as Sentences, from LazySoft Technology. There is a free personal version you can download and try on your own. The Enterprise Edition is also free, but requires a request to the company. Essentially, an associative database allows ...


13

A non-relational document oriented database we have been looking at is Apache CouchDB. Apache CouchDB is a distributed, fault-tolerant and schema-free document-oriented database accessible via a RESTful HTTP/JSON API. Among other features, it provides robust, incremental replication with bi-directional conflict detection and resolution, and is queryable ...


11

Rapid application development comes to mind. When I am constantly evolving my schema, I am constantly frustrated by having to maintain the schema in MySQL/SQLite. While I've not done too much with CouchDB yet, I do like how simple it is to evolve the schema during the RAD process. A case where you might not want to use a non-relational database is when you ...


11

What you're describing is essentially OLAP - Online Analytical Processing. OLAP is one thing that 'traditional' RDBMSes are very good at, in part due to the flexibility and power of SQL - and non-relational databases such as the App Engine datastore aren't. It sounds like your OLAP-type queries will be relatively infrequent compared to normal access, though, ...


11

I cross-posted this question to the couchdb users mailing list and Nathan Stott pointed me to a very helpful blog post by Christopher Lenz


11

Found very interesting the above answers. Trying to add a couple more considerations here. 1) Data aging Time-series management usually need to create aging policies. A typical scenario (e.g. monitoring server CPU) requires to store: 1-sec raw samples for a short period (e.g. for 24 hours) 5-min detail aggregate samples for a medium period (e.g. 1 ...


10

Flat file CSV or other delimited data spreadsheets /etc/passwd mbox mail files Hierarchical Windows Registry Subversion using the file system, FSFS, instead of Berkley DB


10

Not sure if KiokuDB is what you want. It has CouchDB, BDB (BerkeleyDB) and DBI backends.


10

Relational databases have a mathematical basis (set theory, relational theory), which are distilled into SQL == Structured Query Language. NoSQL's many forms (e.g. document-based, graph-based, object-based, key-value store, etc.) may or may not be based on a single underpinning mathematical theory. As S. Lott has correctly pointed out, hierarchical data ...


10

Imagine that GAE has two modes for the Datastore: RDMS-mode and non-RDMS-mode. If I take your ReferenceProperty example with the aim of "list all the users and all their zip codes" and write some code to print all of these. For the [fictional] RDMS-mode Datastore it might look like: for user in User.all().join("location"): print("name: %s zip: %s" % ...


9

Any database that claims to be a "Berkley style Database" or "Key/Value" Database is not relational. These databases are usually based off complex hashing algorithms and provide a very fast lookup O(1) based off a key, but leave any form of relational goodness to end user. For example, in a relational database, you would normalize your structure and join ...


9

MongoDB See the getting started section for Rails Edit As pointed out by Dan, there was actually a Railscast episode about MongoDB today. The video there demonstrates how to use MongoDB with Rails. Thanks for sharing, Dan.


9

Done properly, java/scala cloud deployment can be as painless as "regular" deployment. Also bear in mind that Scala effectively deploys as though it were Java + a library, so any java-centric cloud solutions will be available to you (GWT, EC2, etc.) I'd strongly recommend that you check out Stax if you want to go this route (and I strongly encourage you to ...


9

Rob Conery recently wrote about his experience building his popular web application TekPub with both MongoDB and MySQL, highlighting the strengths of both: The high-read stuff (account info, productions and episode info) is perfect for a "right now" kind of thing like MongoDb. The "what happened yesterday" stuff is perfect for a relational system. At a ...


9

Most of what you "know" is wrong. First of all, as a few of the relational gurus routinely (and sometimes stridently) point out, SQL doesn't really fit nearly as closely with relational theory as many people think. Second, most of the differences in "NoSQL" stuff has relatively little to do with whether it's relational or not. Finally, it's pretty difficult ...


8

Don't get too hung up on the “relational versus non-relational” comparison. It appears to be irrelevant for this issue. The line your application has crossed is a different one: from a small database on local fast file storage, to a large database accessed over the network. Crossing that line means you are now better served by a dedicated, network ...


8

That's a very inefficient solution because you dereference site and region, causing lots and lots of queries. This will not scale beyond maybe 100 events in your DB. The best solution is to denormalize your data by copying e.g. the region's id into Event on save(). Then you can directly do Event.objects.filter(region_id=regionID). The resulting code becomes ...


8

Graph databases were deprecated by relational-ish technology some 20 to 30 years ago. The major theoretical disadvantage is that graph databases use TWO basic concepts to represent information (nodes and edges), whereas a relational database uses only one (the relation). This bleeds over into the language for data manipulation, in that a graph-based ...


7

Google App Engine Datastore : The App Engine datastore is not a relational database. While the datastore interface has many of the same features of traditional databases, the datastore's unique characteristics imply a different way of designing and managing data to take advantage of the ability to scale automatically.


7

All databases were originally non-relational, it was only with the arrival of DB2 and Oracle in the mid 1980's that they became common. Before that most databases where either flat files or hierarchical. Flat files are inherently boring, but hierarchical database are much less so, particularly as DB2 was actually implemented on top of an hierarchical ...


7

I recommend you consider BerkelyDB with awareness of the licensing issues. I am getting very tired of people recommending BerkleyDB without qualification - you can only distribute BDB systems under GPL or some unknown and not publicly visible licensing fee from Oracle. For "local" playing around where it is not in use by external parties, it's probably a ...



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