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4

test.type is None. Use type(test) instead.


1

That's not how you use logging: it's missing the point entirely. The point is to always just log, and then (at the app level) configure handlers appropriately so that they either record the debug level or not. Your app-level configuration can even set the handler for loggers in each module. See the Python logging docs for more info.


0

is it possible to avoid calling logger.debug if it does not exist without if statement? Well, you could (ab)use an if expression, or an or expression, or various other things, but otherwise, not really. You can, however, always write a wrapper function: def logdebug(*args): if logger: logger.debug(*args) logdebug('message') ...


0

You could construct a wrapper object and use that everywhere: class LoggerWrapper(object): def __init__(self, logger): self.logger = logger def debug(self, *args, **kwargs): if self.logger is None: return self.logger.debug(*args, **kwargs) my_wrapper = LoggerWrapper(logger) my_wrapper.debug('message') That ...


2

Your else branch doesn't return anything, so the default return value None is given instead. Rather than just print, at least return the recursive result: def recursive(seq): if not seq: return [seq] else: seq2=seq[1:] print('seq2= ',seq2) print('Type seq2 = ',type(seq2)) recursive_result = recursive(seq2) ...


4

You're calling print() inside of input(), and print() returns None. Simply pass the string to input(): input("Is there anything you wish to change?") Also, shoppingList.sort won't do anything. You need to call it properly: shoppingList.sort().


0

It seems you need to have your STATIC_ROOT/URL set in your settings.py.


0

try setting TINYMCE_JS_ROOT to your tinymce js folder in your settings.py. From what I can tell from your error output this setting is missing.


0

You can also use list comprehensions to do this, which I guess should work regardless of the Python version: max_len = max(len(i) for i in a) [[i[o] if len(i) > o else None for i in a] for o in range(max_len)] Output: [[1, 4, 7], [2, 6, 8], [3, None, 9]] This gives you the flexibility to do whatever you want in case of missing values. max_len = ...


4

It really depends on how you intend the function to be used. If it's only ever going to be used in a boolean context, it might make sense to define and document it as "returns something truthy or something falsey", in which case it's reasonable to return None as something falsey. But if you expect people to, say, log the result for human debugging ...


3

If you don't explicitly return anything, the return value will be None. If the function should return a boolean value, you really should explicitly return False. In your case, None will evaluate to False when implicitly converted to bool, but I wouldn't depend on such behavior. Basically just to be explicit and to improve readability.


5

I think to some extent this is a matter of personal preference. I personally would always prefer former over the latter, since "explicit is better than implicit". Also, if the function is expected to return a bool, I think it's cleaner to return a bool and not some other object whose truthiness needs to be evaluated in order to get a bool.


1

remove mutates the list in-place, and returns None. You have to put it in a variable, and then change that: >>> var = ['p', 's', 'c', 'x', 'd'] >>> var.remove('d') # Notice how it doesn't return anything. >>> var ['p', 's', 'c', 'x']


5

remove doesn't return anything. It modifies the existing list in-place. No assignment needed. Replace var = ['p', 's', 'c', 'x', 'd'].remove('d') with var = ['p', 's', 'c', 'x', 'd'] var.remove('d') Now var will have a value of ['p', 's', 'c', 'x'].


2

While trying and handling exception is, in general, a fundamental principle of Python—EAFP, or Easier to Ask Forgiveness than Permission—it isn't always appropriate. At the very least, a NameError is the kind of thing that's generally more of a logic error in your code that needs to be fixed than an exceptional situation to be handled, so there's a pretty ...


2

No, that's a pretty ridiculous use of try/except. Declare it upfront and define it as None, and then update it as smallest = num if smallest is None else min(num, smallest) Alternatively, you could initialize it as smallest = [], and then update it as smallest = [min(smallest + [num])] then finish it off with print("Minimum is {}".format(smallest) ...


0

I still want to write a function to practice python myself. I already fixed the code to: def remove_duplicate(s_list): new_list = s_list[:] for member in s_list: new_list.remove(member) for other in new_list: if other == member: s_list.remove(other) return s_list When I input the list [1,1,1,2,3,4], the function returns ...


1

I would suggest to work with two lists instead of changing one list in-place, if possible. If order is not important, you can use a set: dup_list = [1,1,2,3,2,5,2] dupfree_list = list(set(dup_list)) Otherwise, if the order of elements is important, you can note which elements you have already seen: dupfree_list = [] for e in dup_list: if e not in ...


0

I think the most Pythonic way is to use a set which removes duplicates: listwithduplicates = [1,2,3,3] listwithduplicates = set(listwithduplicates) The result is: {2,1,3} Note that sets are not ordered the way lists are.


0

d = {} d1 = {} with file as f: for line in f: key, val = line.strip().split(",") d[str(key)] = val d1[str(val)] = key def findCapital(state): return d.get(state) def findState(capital): return d1.get(capital)


0

to return none you can check if an keyvalue is in the dictionary with in if key in dict: return dict[key] else: return None


0

You need to test if the value exists in the dictionary. if d.has_key(): do something



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