Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Some lower normal forms don't apply. Sometimes a relation is already in 3NF before you do anything to it. You can skip normal forms that don't apply and you can jump straight to 3NF (or higher, if applicable) directly. It is not necessary to do each step before proceeding to the next.


1

JobSeeker and Vacancy are two separate entities. In most cases, you would store the values in separate tables with separate columns. Although they have overlapping attributes, they have many attributes that are not common. The, use application code logic (often implemented in SQL) to match between the two. For something like skills, you actually want ...


0

Having a null attribute in denormalized data means simply that there would be no corresponding row in a normalized data. In the example above, nulls mean only that the "FRENCH 2" course does not have a room and a tutor assigned. The only implication to your normalized data model is that the queries must perform outer joins instead of inner joins.


0

I found that the answer lies here, in the form of a 'junction' or 'mapping' table: How can I associate one record with another in the same table?


0

I think adding a new table that will link the ID of your list to the ID of the email address would be the best course of action with this. Then when your system goes to send email to a specific list, the lookup can be done on this table using joins to the referenced tables.


0

Hidden layers are used in accordance with the complexity of our data. If we have input data which is linearly separable then we need not to use hidden layer e.g. OR gate but if we have a non linearly seperable data then we need to use hidden layer for example ExOR logical gate. Number of nodes taken at any layer depends upon the degree of cross validation of ...


1

This is not impossible to demonstrate on SO. ;) There's nothing intrinsically special about the source data being a CSV. You just have the data. I will simulate it with a source query and add an additional return to ensure I have the problem solved for N returns. You're looking at a Multicast operator. This allows you to perform operations on the same ...


0

Lets assume that you managed to get your data to 'MyImport' table. All you need to do is use DISTINCT: SELECT DISTINCT ReturnID, Employee FROM MyImport; SELECT DISTINCT ReturnID, ProductID, Quantity FROM MyImport;


0

A functional dependency has one set determining another. Either set can have any number of attributes. (If a set has just one attribute we also say that that attribute determines or is determined.) Transitive functional dependency is defined as: If A → B and B → C then A → C (Reference: This Tutorial!) That is unclear. So is your reference. A → C ...


0

Your issue is that you are normalising the data in linear space (by subtracting the minimum) and then converting to logarithmic space. Inevitable one of your values becomes zero, hence log(0) == -Infinity. Instead, take the logarithm first on unnormalised data, and then determine the ranges of your Y axis for plotting. See ...


0

It is absolutely worse to have multiple STATE tables. There is nothing wrong with many tables referencing one specific table For example, it is nothing wrong with Users and Work_Office and Car_Registration tables referencing to an Address table. However, there are a few things that you should note: State vs. Address: Do Employees, and Work_Office and ...


0

First, it's important to note that this issue is not related to the difference between 1D and 2D FFTs, but rather to how total power and mean power scale with the number of elements in an array. You are exactly right when you say that the factor of 9 comes from the 9x more elements in a than b. What is confusing, perhaps, is that you noticed that you've ...


0

OK, no answer. Here is the messy solution: static final Pattern DIGIT_0 = Pattern.compile("[٠۰߀०০੦૦୦௦౦೦൦๐໐0]"); static final Pattern DIGIT_1 = Pattern.compile("[١۱߁१১੧૧୧௧౧೧൧๑໑1]"); static final Pattern DIGIT_2 = Pattern.compile("[٢۲߂२২੨૨୨௨౨೨൨๒໒2]"); static final Pattern DIGIT_3 = Pattern.compile("[٣۳߃३৩੩૩୩௩౩೩൩๓໓3]"); static final Pattern DIGIT_4 = ...


1

Use UNPIVOT to normalize your table: SELECT u.RespondentID, u.Country FROM @source UNPIVOT (Country FOR c IN (Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Denmark, Finland, France)) u @source is a table that contains the data imported from your Excel worksheet. Test data: DECLARE @source TABLE ( RespondentID BIGINT NOT NULL, Andorra VARCHAR(25), ...


0

UNION clause is the way to go: SELECT * FROM ( SELECT RespondentID, Field1 as Country FROM myTable UNION SELECT RespondentID, Field2 as Country FROM myTable UNION .... UNION SELECT RespondentID, Fieldn as Country FROM myTable) t WHERE Country IS NOT NULL


0

Got Ya!! Ok, this is not the best fix but it works! If anyone can do this better please post.. Add this to line 2 of the above code (where the comment '###' is): var Lmax=Math.max.apply(this,close); var Lmin=Math.min.apply(this,close); var Ldif=(Lmax-Lmin); var Logar=[]; var infinity=[]; for(var i=close.length-1;i>=0;i--){ ...


0

There are a number of ways that the value could be handled depending on the conditions of your Neural Network. Some include: 1/. The Input may be maximised to a value of 1 2/. This may exceed 1 depending on the normalisation algorithm applied and whether the Neural Network was designed to allow it (Typically, if all data was normalised, these values ...


2

Optimization techniques will likely depend on the size of the center table and intended query patterns. This is very similar to what you get in data warehousing star schemas, so approaches from that paradigm may help. For one, ensuring the size of each row is absolutely as small as possible. Disk space may be cheap, but disk throughput, memory, and CPU ...


0

Have you tried to export it to Microsoft Excel Power Pivot with Power Query? you can make fast data analysis with pretty awsome ways to show it with Power view video sample


1

Since you are set on your way. you can consider duplicating data in order to join less times in a similar way to what is done in olap database. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OLAP_cube With that said I don't think this is the best way to do it if you have 100 properties.


3

Some folks are recommending to store the preferences one per row. This is called an Entity-Attribute-Value table, and it is not normalized. Some people say EAV is "more normalized," but they're mistaken. There is no rule of normalization that encourages EAV as a design in a relational database. One practical way you can tell it's not normalized is that you ...


1

If you say that you have growing preferences then I would suggest you make a new table for preferences and add the FKey to the UserPreferences Users Table - userid, email, age, alternateemail ... Preferences table - Preferenceid, preference_Value, active, required Users Preferences table - userid, preferenceid, preference_data Now you can have your ever ...


1

A normalized userPreference table would contain the userID, preferenceID, and preferenceValue. Preferences would list all of your preferences (email, age, etc) on one row with an ID as the PK, plus whatever descriptive information you wanted to add. since the data types of the preference values differ, you can declare it as a string/varchar, or, if you ...


1

It doesn't make sense to split a single table in to two tables. Only time you split like this is some users doesn't have Preferences at all. Creating a new column - whenever new Preference comes up - is not a good idea. If you think Preferences will grow in the future, you can use the following method -


1

At a minimum you could just have Users and Preferences. There should be a one to many relationship between users and preferences. One user can have many preferences. You could also split out the email addresses into another table - so that one user could have multiple email addresses - you can have a flag to denote the primary one. The DDL would look like: ...


1

You could do a join on a subquery summing the amount by cluster select t1.cluster, amount / sumAmount from Table1 t1 join (select cluster, sum(amount) as sumAmount from Table1 group by cluster)s on t1.cluster = s.cluster see SqlFiddle EDIT SELECT c.cluster, brand, COUNT(o.id) / coalesce(s.sumBrandAmount, 0) AS brand_amount -- ...


0

You can use numpy where and apply to do it for all columns in a DataFrame: import numpy as np import pandas as pd m = pd.DataFrame({ 'a': range(5), 'b': range(5, 10), 'c': range(10,15)}) print(m) a b c 0 0 5 10 1 1 6 11 2 2 7 12 3 3 8 13 4 4 9 14 ...


0

There are a handful of different ways to do this. In general, using a list comprehension is not an efficient way express a pandas operation - that particular line could be rewritten as (see the indexing docs). m.loc[m[col] >= val, col] = quart But the whole operation could be written in one line, like this (importing numpy as np): In [211]: m = ...


0

The normalization of the distance is based on the ranges of the attribute values of the instances of the data set that the distance function was created with. Your wVector data set does not contain any instances. You have to add the instances like this: wVector.add(firstInstance); wVector.add(secondInstance); Then it should work as expected.



Top 50 recent answers are included