New answers tagged

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use_idf=true (by default) introduces a global component to the term frequency component (local component: individual article). When looking after the similarity of two texts, instead of counting the number of terms that each of them has and compare them, introducing the idf helps categorizing these terms into relevant or not. According to Zipf's law, the ...


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Normalization would be advisable. In future if you are required to store two or more order times for the same day then just adding rows in your vendor_day_order table will be required. In case you go with the first approach you will be required to make modifications to your table structure.


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A correct answer is AD. How is this obtained? Consider that, like for functional dependencies, you can have multivalued dependencies implied by other multivalued dependencies. For instance, there is a pseudo-transitivity rule (or multi-valued transitivity rules) that says: If X →→ Y holds, and Y →→ Z holds, then X →→ Z − Y holds For this rule, ...


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You can also use a simple loop: var arr = [{id: 1, name: 'one', desc: 'one'}, {id: 2, name: 'two', desc: 'two'}, {id: 3, name: 'three', desc: 'three'}], obj = {} for(var item of arr) obj[item.id] = item; Usually loops are faster than ES5 array methods because they don't have to call a function at each iteration.


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try this: ar = [ {id: 1, name: 'one', desc: 'one'}, {id: 2, name: 'two', desc: 'two'}, {id: 3, name: 'three', desc: 'three'} ] var result = ar.reduce((ac, x) => {return ac[x.id] = x , ac ;}, {}) document.write( JSON.stringify(result) ) but remember that the keys are strings and you're dealing with an object not array...


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I like Array.prototype.reduce() solutions. Check this out var arr = [{id: 1, name: 'one', desc: 'one'}, {id: 2, name: 'two', desc: 'two'}, {id: 3, name: 'three', desc: 'three'}], obj = arr.reduce((p,c) => {p[c.id] = c; return p},{}); document.write("<pre>" + JSON.stringify(obj,null,2) + "</pre>");


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I would say that it is: const obj = Object.assign( {}, array ); Although, I haven't compared its performance to your options.


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You need to maintain the aspect ratio. This means you'll have to change the scale with the same size for both X and Y. First find the Maximum-X size and Maximum-Y size, then take the larger one and use it as size. UPDATE Find the minimum X, maximum X, minimum Y and maximum Y of the entire set. Find the maximum between (MaxX - MinX) and (MaxY - MinY). Use ...


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One way is to keep categories in one single table - e.g. category - and define an X table for each entity/table that needs 0 or more category associations: rssFeedXCategory rssFeedId INT FK -> rssFeed (id) categoryId INT FK -> category (id) atomFeedXCategory atomFeedId INT FK -> atomFeed (id) categoryId INT FK -> category (id) and so ...


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I'm assuming this is your question i do not understand how Zip can be the primary key of the address table if the zip can occur more than once. and the reason why you don't understand is just because Zip is a bad example. All the explanation is correct. If you can infer any "non-prime" attribute base upon another "non-prime" attribute you have what ...


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It is a lossless decomposition for sure. The row corresponding to R3 gets filled with one variable. As an aside, if you have the above decomposition obtained using Bernstein Synthesis then just checking whether any of the decomposed relations consists of all the attributes of the key of the original relation R will ensure that it's a lossless decomposition. ...


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You will want to have 1 row per user_ID so you can easily access all the data. e.g. for your gameID 5002947 (row11) this needs to be split into the following: id setup_id user_ID 5002947 997 563749 5002947 997 500243 5002947 997 536271 ... You have two options. Create a complex SQL query that will handle this (I can't ...


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Here's another suggestion when you are already playing with Spark. Why don't you use MinMaxScaler in ml package? Let's try this with the same example from zero323. import org.apache.spark.mllib.linalg.Vectors import org.apache.spark.ml.feature.MinMaxScaler import org.apache.spark.sql.functions.udf val df = sc.parallelize(Seq( (1L, 0.5), (2L, 10.2), ...


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I have used what I guess you would call the base table approach. For example, I had tables for names, addresses, and phonenumbers, each with an identity as PK. Then I had a main entity table entity(entityID), and a linking table: attribute(entityKey, attributeType, attributeKey), wherein the attributeKey could point to any of the first three tables, ...


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Something like this: mins = min(trainingDataset); maxs = max(trainingDataset); testDataset = 2*bsxfun(@rdivide, bsxfun(@minus,testDataset,mins), maxs-mins)-1;


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In your 2nd image, you skipped the traditional 1NF treatment of repeating groups (duplicating the grouped data into separate rows for each Matches ID) and went straight to 2NF. No problem there. Your 3NF is correct as well. Is Mobile No and Photo Name also a transitive dependency? No. The photographer's name and mobile phone number are attributes ...


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Your problem, I think, is that as far as I can see you don't really have an identifier for a person. The closest you have there is the name. That can give you problems but it passes, I think, the definition of 3NF in this case. The big issue is you probably want to be able to identify two different individuals named 'John James' so the actual problem is ...


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As far as I have learned till date. There must not be any functional dependency in the table to make it pass the 3NF test. If there is any column in the table that can work at place of primary key then it must not be there. Now look at the table after normalization - mobile number for sure is a unique id.


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Since your xbox, pc, nintendo and playstation tables are all identical you may want to consider combining them into one and adding some sort of "type" column (or, as Prix mentioned, maybe have a one-to-many between platform and type in case the game can run on more than one platform). With the current design you will start running into problems with any ...


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I later realised that what I really needed as an analyser that would all me to automatically normalise a mixture of qualitative (nominal) and quantitive data (just like the CSV implementation). The problem was that the existing code was tightly coupled to CSV files. To combat this I wrote my own encog extension method library. it can be found here: ...


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The encog analyst is fantastic for normalizing data. It can take information stored in a CSV file and automatically determine the normalized fields and their type of encoding (including 1 of N equilateral encoding). The only downside of this is that the logic is tightly coupled with the ReadCSV class. Favouring extension as opposed to modification I ...


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I will create 2 tables where most of the mandatory and important columns in table1(may 10-15 columns),rest in table2. Most importantly some of your columns are extra,like HaveFiveStars, HaveFourStars, HaveThreeStars, HaveTwoStars, HaveOneStar.So instead of 5 column here you can have only one column like ViewerRating. Similarly you can eliminate other ...


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Just add a separate table that has a book_id as a foreign key. Since not all books will have additional details, left outer join from book table to the additional details table.


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You can use the scale function in an sapply: scaleddf <- as.data.frame(sapply(train, function(i) if(is.numeric(i)) scale(i) else i)) If your data contains variables with NaN values or with 0 variance, you could first process and subset the original dataset before using the function above. # get a vector of variables to drop dropVars <- ...


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Your step to split the row with a multivalued attribute into multiple rows looks almost like the step to resolve repeating groups to achieve 1NF. However, in that transformation, each new row gets a copy of the corresponding values in the original. Your auto-increment column incremented for the new row, and hence your 2nd table is a different problem, and ...


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Possible reason: In this cycle you use modified value of NEFD[n][0] to calculate new value of NEFD[n][2] (the same for NEFD[n][1]). It seems you have to store and use unmodified values. for n:=1 to m_num_efd do begin NEFD[n][0] := cs*NEFD[n][0] + ss*NEFD[n][2]; NEFD[n][1] := cs*NEFD[n][1] + ss*NEFD[n][3]; vvvvvvvvv ...


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According to your FD's and Relation , your Candidate key will be: {bmiodjnhr} Hence , Prime Attrbutes (9) ={b,m,i,o,d,j,n,h,r} Non-Prime Attrbutes (9) = { l, s, e, c, a, f, k, p, g} Now Checking for 2NF: "Partial Dependencies are not allowed". Means part of Candidate key should not determine the Non- Prime Attribute. ...


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Thank you very much for your answer, I didn't know about the pipeline feature before For the case of L2 normalization turns out you can do it manually. Here is one example for a small array: x = np.array([5, 8 , 12, 15]) #Using Sklearn normalizer_x = preprocessing.Normalizer(norm = "l2").fit(x) x_norm = normalizer_x.transform(x)[0] print x_norm ...


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According to your answers in exam: 1 NF : a.Data in each column should be atomic.No, multiple values separated by commas (TRUE because 1NF does not support Composite and Multivalued attributes and more importantly, this property is handeled during ER Model to relational model conversion by default.) Only this property is enough for 1NF. b.Table should ...


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Don't use getPixel(), but getSample(). So your code would be: final int valueBefore = img.getRaster().getSample(x, y, 0) ; or even histogram[img.getRaster().getSample(x, y, 0)]++ ; Btw, you may want to check the image type first in order to determine the number of channels/bands and do this process for each channel.


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The stack trace you posted says your out of range index is 1. The exception isn't thrown where you think it is. getPixel(int x, int y, int[] iarray) fills iarray with the intensity values of the pixel. If you are using an rgb image, there will be at least three intensity values for each channel, if you are using rgb with alpha there will be 4 intensity ...


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If you are talking about sklearn.preprocessing.Normalizer, which normalizes matrix lines, unfortunately there is no way to go back to original norms unless you store them by hand somewhere. If you are using sklearn.preprocessing.StandardScaler, which normalizes columns, then you can obtain the values you need to go back in the attributes of that scaler ...


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You mean features not labels. It is not necessary to normalize your features for regression or classification, even though in some cases, it is a trick that can help converging faster. You might want to check this post. To my experience, when using a simple model like a linear regression with only a few variables, keeping the features as they are (without ...


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When you say "normalize" labels, it is not clear what you mean (i.e. whether you mean this in a statistical sense or something else). Can you please provide an example? On Making labels uniform in data analysis If you are trying to neaten labels for use with the text() function, you could try the abbreviate() function to shorten them, or the format() ...


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Use boolean indexing -- refer to document In [143] df[df.column_a.str.contains(r'\bwar.*')] Out [143] 0 warsaw 2 warszawa 4 warsawa 10 warschau If there are null values then do this: df[pd.notnull(df.column_a) & df.column_a.str.contains(r'\bwar.*')]


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I have now found a way to run a search to return unique values in a DataFrame column. The solution is to extract the values instead. For the problem, as described above, I have used str.extract() instead of what str.contains() In [1311]: df.column_a.str.extract(r"\b(war.*)").unique() Out[1311]: array(['warsaw', nan, 'waraszawa', 'warszawskiej', ...


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assuming that you are using a data.frame named df without any factor variables, the following code should work without any special packages (as suggested by @user20650: ranging<-function(x){(x-min(x))/(max(x)-min(x))} dfNorm <- lapply(df, ranging) If your data.frame has factor variables, which should not be normalized, you can use the following: ...


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If we are using dplyr, mutate_each can take the ranging function and apply to all the columns of the dataset. library(dplyr) df1 %>% mutate_each(funs(ranging)) data df1 <- structure(list(v3 = c(0L, 2L, 1L, 4L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L), v4 = c(1L, 4L, 2L, 5L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L), v5 = c(2L, 6L, 4L, 6L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L), v6 = c(3L, 5L, 7L, 4L, 5L, 5L, ...


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source("https://bioconductor.org/biocLite.R") biocLite("preprocessCore") x <- data.frame(fid = c("0002", "0005", "0081", "0091", "0094", "0095"), iid = c("0002", "0005", "0081", "0091", "0094", "0095"), phen = c(-.268465, -.033474, .2921848, 1.836548, .9888859, -.1503887), sig = c(0, ...


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If I understand your problem correctly, youre building a regression model using data where the average spend is $15, but now you're trying to use that model to predict outcomes for a different group where the average spend is $5, and this is throwing your predictions off? The reason this happens is because your model specification is wrong. The correct way ...


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The solutions mainly differ in the ways to make sure that no more than one default value is assigned for each table. is_default solution: Here it may happen that more than one record of a table has the value 1. It depends on the SQL dialect of your database whether this can be excluded by a constraint. As far as I understand MySQL, this kind of constraint ...


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bsxfun is your friend: out = bsxfun(@rdivide, d, norms); What this does is that it temporarily creates a 3D matrix that replicates each row of norms for as many columns as there are in d and it divides each element in an element-wise manner with d and norms. We get: >> d = cat(3, [1 2 3; 4 5 6], [7 8 9; 10 11 12]); >> norms = ...


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Advantage of the 50 column solution: Access to all species on a given sample point will be efficient. Advantages of the one-to-many solution: Increasing the number of species can be done without a redesign of the database, just by entering new records containing the species id. Access to all sample points containing a given species will be easier than ...


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A 'song' can have 0 or 1 or many of each of genres, instruments, samples and playlists. So it does not make sense to have fewer than 5 tables. Furthermore, many of these are "many-to-many". For example, one playlist can have many songs; one song can be in many playlists. To handle such, you need an extra table with song_id and playlist_id to establish ...


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How much data do you mean when you say "large amount of data"? A few million songs and related metadata should not pose any real performance issue for a standard database setup. I would recommend designing your database in 3rd Normal Form (3NF) thereby using 4 or more separate tables. With a denormalized structure (one big table), there will be duplicate ...



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