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4

You're using nose which supports tests generator: from nose.tools import assert_raises def throw_error(): raise TypeError def test_loop(): for i in range(5): yield assert_raises, TypeError, throw_error


2

Modules are loaded from the sys.path array. If you clear that array then any non-core import will fail. The following commands were run in ipython in a virtual env with access to django import sys sys.path = [] import django ... ImportError ... import os ... No ImportError ... Your other alternative is to use two virtual environments. One which has the ...


2

Roger Veciana suggested I turn my comment into an actual answer, so here it is. I would take the approach of patching out sqlite3 imported in your module and then work from there. Let's assume your module is named what.py. I would patch out what.sqlite3 and then mock the return value of .connect().cursor().fetchall. Here is a more complete example: ...


1

You should have a setup.py; in the setup.py you should have: setup( ... scripts = ['bin/run_my_app'] ... ) and bin/run_my_app then a script with content: #!/usr/bin/env python from app.main import main main() Now when you run python setup.py develop or python setup.py install, the setuptools/distribute will install the command line script ...


1

nosebook may suit your purposes. I built it to handle just such cases: it requires no special markup in the notebook, and does some of the sanitization mentioned by @minrk.


1

I can reproduce the issue: #!/usr/bin/env python import time timestamp = time.strftime('%S') def test_me(): print('test_me ' + timestamp) assert 0 if __name__ == '__main__': import nose # $ pip install nose print('main ' + timestamp) time.sleep(3) nose.main() print('main ' + timestamp) and print('test_me ' + timestamp) show ...


1

This is how you do it with unittest.TestCase: import sys import unittest from nose.tools import istest def throw_error(): sys.stderr.write('In throw error!') raise TypeError class Test(unittest.TestCase): pass def _create(): """ Helper method to make functions on the fly """ @istest def func_name(self): ...


1

That is a very wide question with a lot of resources available. However, I will recommend py.test because getting started is very easy despite having a full set of tools. Nose has a bit more configuration needed than py.test before starting. Unittest is like junit in java, which is not a bad place to start. Anyway, I recommend py.test.


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Most likely nose captures stdout. If you can run it with -s option it should work as expected. You can also use from nose.tools import set_trace; set_trace() to use pdb debugger, it will pass stdout/stdin properly.


1

You can make a subclass of the abstract class and test the subclass. Also, instead of pass, you could raise a NotImplementedError when the abstract methods are called: @abstractproperty def a(self): raise NotImplementedError("Not implemented") @abstractmethod def do(self, obj): raise NotImplementedError("Not implemented") As stated in the Python ...



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