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2

If you are using Python 3.X, you should write it like this: args = ['--py3where', 'test_dir/testsetA/', '--collect-only']


2

You can use nose-ittr, its a nose extension for supporting parametrized testing. example: @ittr(case1=[1,3,2],case2=[2,31,1]) def test_sorts(): check_sort(sort1, self.case1) check_sort(sort2, self.case2)


2

I don't think nosetests offers any way for you to add custom command-line options (except that of course you can edit its code to customize it for you, but that may not be practical). In typical Unixy shells, however, you can set environment variables on the fly for any given command: $ NOSEQUICK=1 nosetests my_module/tests/my_test.py then in your code ...


1

A good way is to decorate your tests with attributes and thus split them in groups. Say you could have 'unit' for quick and isolated tests and 'integration' for more long-running and thorough tests. You can then run those groups selectively with nose -a attrname


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You don't specify the version of python you are using. With Python 2.7+ you can define a load_tests function in your module which will be called to create the TestSuite for the module. However, nose ignores the load_tests protocol. If you have nose2 then it features a plugin for the load tests protocol. Otherwise, you create a blank TestCase and populate ...


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You can use nose multiprocess built in plugin for that, something like: from nose_parameterized import parameterized import urllib2 urls = ['http://www.google.com', 'http://www.yahoo.com'] @parameterized(urls) def test_add(url): a = urllib2.urlopen(url).read() b = 2 + urls.index(url) c = 3 + urls.index(url) assert a+str(b) == str(c) and ...


1

You could browse archive.org for the old results. Here's an example of a snapshot from 2012 (near the beginning of archive.org's records for the current site url): https://web.archive.org/web/20120731114655/http://nose.readthedocs.org/en/latest


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You should be able to upgrade nosetests via pip, while still staying with python 2.6. At least, nose 1.3.4 (latest as of this writing) installs cleanly inside the py2.6 virtualenv I just threw together. I don't have any py2.6-compatible code to hand to show that it's working correctly, though.


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The only thing that works now is actually the directory approach. It is still not possible to specify the path... python setup.py nosetests -w tests/test_folder


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Have you considered unittest? It does exist for this reason, and nose will work with it nicely: import unittest class MyLiveServerTest(unittest.TestCase): def setUp(self): self.server = MyServer() self.server.start() def test_client(self): client = MyClient('localhost', self.server.port) assert ...



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