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16

You have done right. But you did a small mistake. You have passed NSString as an attribute for NSFontAttributeName but it expects NSFont. Try this. NSFont *boldFontName = [NSFont boldSystemFontOfSize:12]; [attrString beginEditing]; NSRange ran = NSMakeRange(0, 8); [attrString addAttribute:NSFontAttributeName value:boldFontName ...


9

Here's your problem: if(_textBox1.stringValue != @"") You're comparing pointer equality, so this expression always returns true because the string constant @"" will never be the same object as the text field's string object. The correct way to do this comparison would be: if (![_textBox1.stringValue isEqualToString:@""]) or even better: if ...


8

To change the key equivalents for the NSButton elements inside of the NSAlert object, you'll have to access the buttons directly (after creation and before -runModal) and change the key equivalents using the -setKeyEquivalent: method. For example, to set the Disconnect to be ESC and the Cancel to be return, you would do the following: NSArray *buttons = ...


7

At the point where you start needing to add inputs, what you are creating is no longer an alert dialog. Create a NSPanel in the Interface Builder with the necessary controls and use that instead.


7

Have you tried activating your application in the code that displays the alert? [[NSRunningApplication currentApplication] activateWithOptions:0]; If passing 0 doesn't work, you can pass NSApplicationActivateIgnoringOtherApps as your option, but Apple recommends against it unless really necessary (see docs for NSRunningApplication). Update: You have ...


6

It should work to just put [[alert window] orderOut:nil] at the top of the first alert-end method. This is actually documented in the reference for -[NSAlert beginSheetModalForWindow:modalDelegate:didEndSelector:contextInfo:\].


5

What you're trying to do is "chain" the alerts. To do this you need to call orderOut: on the alert window. Here's the documentation: If you want to dismiss the sheet from within the alertDidEndSelector method before the modal delegate carries out an action in response to the return value, send orderOut: (NSWindow) to the window object ...


4

There is an easier way, simply check the contents of [runModal] in an if statement: //setup the dialog NSAlert *networkErrorDialog = [NSAlert alertWithMessageText:@"Couldn't connect to the server" defaultButton:@"Network Diagnostics" alternateButton:@"Quit" otherButton:nil informativeTextWithFormat:@"Check that your computer is connected to the internet and ...


4

I wrecked my brain about this exact thing a while ago. The only way that I could get this to work (sort of), was to subclass NSApplication, and override -sendEvent. In -sendEvent, you'd first call super's implementation, then do something like this: id *modalWindow = [self modalWindow]; if (modalWindow && [modalWindow level] != ...


4

Yes. You can use - (void)setIcon:(NSImage *)icon Look at the documentation.


4

Sounds like a job for Growl. It's a third-party software product, for which we provide a framework you can include in your application. See also the application-developer page.


4

Since contextInfo is considered to be a "raw" C pointer (void *) and can be anything, it's your responsibility to manage memory (if you're passing an Objective-C object: to retain it).


4

You must start a modal session for you sheet after showing it and stop the session after closing sheet. Check this: https://github.com/incbee/NSAlert-SynchronousSheet, I think it will be helpfull.


4

Your image is null because it is not found. This may occur if your image is not copied in your bundle or if the filename is wrong. Important note: Clean your project before every test to ensure that the resources are updated. The name of the image should contain the extension too, except for .png where it is not mandatory. If you still have the problem, ...


4

Warning about the recommended solution: This code causes wasteful and pointless overhead: for (;;) { if ([NSApp runModalSession:session] != NSRunContinuesResponse) break; } This code is copied straight from the Apple documentation page - but it's meant to show the developer where meaningful code can be inserted for background execution while ...


4

Assuming the code that calls the confirm:withMoreInfo:andTheActionButtonTitle: is called from validate. -(void)validate { NSAlert *alert = [[NSAlert alloc] init]; [alert setMessageText:questionTitle]; // fill out NSAlert [alert beginSheetModalForWindow:self.window completionHandler:^(NSModalResponse returnCode) { if(returnCode == NSModalResponseStop) ...


3

It does leak. Put a breakpoint on dealloc (or create a subclass of NSAlert and add a log statement to dealloc) to show this The accessry view should be released. You alloc it and then it would be retained by the alertView Here's a concise guide on when to use retainCount.


3

That’s the current default layout of an alert. An alert with three buttons is treated differently because its common use case is: The first button (e.g. OK) represents a confirmation The second button (e.g. Cancel) represents a cancellation The third button (e.g. Kill the Penguin) represents an alternative action, potentially a destructive one. The third ...


3

If [MMAlertController monitorAlert] returns an NSAlert that was created with alertWithMessageText:defaultButton:alternateButton:otherButton:informativeTextW‌​ithFormat: then your switch should actually contain NSAlertDefaultReturn and NSAlertAlternateReturn. (If it was created in any other way then your original switch values are correct.)


3

The question is the answer. I'm just posting this to close it out. Sorry for twisting the stackoverflow format.


2

Here you go: 1) NSAlert has a window property. Hence use that. 2) Create a custom accessory view containing two NSTextView's and a disclosure triangle 3) Set this custom view as accessory view of NSAlert 4) Before displaying the alert, set the window property of NSAlert in your custom view (This way you will have access to NSAlert's window when you click ...


2

What are you trying to do? Background processes can still display UI and bring themselves to the front without using TransformProcessType; just make sure you are a LSUIElement, not LSBackgroundOnly (or the deprecated NS* equivalents). The only reason you typically need to use TransformProcessType is if you want a Dock icon or menu bar.


2

What I ended up doing was abandoning NSAlert and instead I load an alertish NSWindow from a NIB. Here is the code that displays the window: - (void)showAlert { NSWindow *w = [self window]; [w makeFirstResponder:nil]; [w setLevel:NSFloatingWindowLevel]; [w center]; [w makeKeyAndOrderFront:self]; } This is intended to make it act like ...


2

There is no supported way to display a window when the display is captured. That’s what capturing the display means.


2

If you send activateIgnoringOtherApps then you're basically dismissing your own notification.


2

You're not turning off your location manager when you first show the alert. As the location is refined by the device (ie, the accuracy is increased), your callback will be (potentially) called multiple times. You should use [locMan stopUpdatingLocation] after your alert display.


2

Normally alerts close when any button is pressed. In Mac OS X 10.5 or later you can use setAccessoryView: to insert a custom view into the alert, which presumably can contain a button that does anything you want. Note however that you can't specify where the accessory view goes. It might have a button in it but the button would show up in the middle of ...


2

You have to show the sheet on the next run loop by delaying it using performSelector:withObject:afterDelay or an equivalent method.


2

You will need a custom window with custom view drawing, however NSAlert does not allow you to change its window. So you will need to write your own window controller subclass like NSAlert ( though NSAlert is a subclass of NSObject ).


2

I looked around a bit, and found this piece of code : NSModalSession session = [NSApp beginModalSessionForWindow:sheetWindow]; for (;;) { if ([NSApp runModalSession:session] != NSRunContinuesResponse) break; } [NSApp endModalSession:session]; I call [NSApp stopModal] to end the session. Now my code is way cleaner :)



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