Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

The first way is preferred. Not only because it is "modern" (which doesn't mean much), shorter and less error prone. There is a subtle problem with initWithObjects: If you manage to include an object pointer that is actually nil, then initWithObjects will use this as the trailing nil pointer, while the literal syntax will throw an exception. NSString* ...


5

You cannot rely on the results of description as it is not a convert to string operator, but merely a debugging aid. There is nothing to stop it changing between O/S releases and there is no equivalent fromDescription method. The conventional way of serializing an Objective-C collection to and from a string is to use JSON, so look at the ...


5

The structure of NSArray is more complicated than just simple inheritance from NSObject, because NSArray is a class cluster. You can find more about class clusters at https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/general/conceptual/CocoaEncyclopedia/ClassClusters/ClassClusters.html


3

First remove the unwanted characters from the string, like white spaces and braces: NSString* str = @"[90, 5, 6]"; NSCharacterSet* characterSet = [[NSCharacterSet characterSetWithCharactersInString:@"0123456789,"] invertedSet]; NSString* newString = [[str componentsSeparatedByCharactersInSet:characterSet] ...


3

If you need to check whether array contains an object you should go with if ([imageOneArray containsObject:[UIImage imageNamed:@"White.png"]]) { //DO SOMETHING }; Here you should note, that array checks for containment sending -isEqual: to its objects. So, on the UIImage -isEqual: will do just pointers comparison. The above code will return YES due to ...


3

sizeof() is a language keyword that returns the storage size of a type and is evaluated at compile time. For example: NSData *obj = [NSData data]; NSLog(@"%lu", sizeof(obj)); would print either 4 on a 32-bit platform or 8 on a 64-bit platform as obj is a pointer and that's how much space a pointer takes on those platforms. It's the same as: ...


3

You are adding a string to an array and using it as a predicate. Try: NSDateComponents *components = nil; NSMutableArray *predicates = [NSMutableArray array];; for (NSDate *currentdate in dates) { components = [calendar components:NSYearCalendarUnit|NSMonthCalendarUnit|NSDayCalendarUnit fromDate:currentdate]; NSString ...


3

Here is one of the basic use of NSPredicate for filtering array . NSMutableArray *array = [NSMutableArray arrayWithObjects:@"Nick", @"Ben", @"Adam", @"Melissa", @"arbind", nil]; NSPredicate *sPredicate = [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@"SELF contains[c] 'b'"]; NSArray *beginWithB = [array filteredArrayUsingPredicate:sPredicate]; NSLog(@"beginwithB = ...


2

Two thousand is a small-ish sized array. Before you go to far, read Knuth's view about premature optimization. Put effort into speeding it up after you see a manifest problem. If you get to that point, this does sound like a good application for NSMutableDictionary. It can have 2k keys which are words, do a (NSSet-like) lookup, and keep an associated ...


2

It's possible, you have to retrieve your immutable array and make a mutable copy, then write it back to user defaults. NSUserDefaults *userDefaults = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults]; NSArray *customerNames = [userDefaults objectForKey:@"customerName"]; NSMutableArray *mCustomerNames = [customerNames mutableCopy]; mCustomerNames[0] = @"Some Other ...


2

As stated in the documentation: For NSArray and NSDictionary objects, their contents must be property list objects. This means you need to convert your String objects to NSString when saving, something like this should work: var food : [String] { get { var returnValue : [String]? = ...


2

Yes, it would. Arrays retain objects added to them, and release them when they are removed. Here is your example code with reference counts in comments: @implementation MXViewController { NSMutableArray *_objects; } - (void)viewDidLoad { _objects = [@[] mutableCopy]; NSObject *objectA = [NSObject new]; //objectA has a reference count of 1 ...


2

You can use your function, but replace NSCountedSet by NSSet (this isn't too important as dictionaries can't have duplicate keys), and use the allKeys property of NSDictionary. So: - (BOOL)haveSameKeys:(NSDictionary *)dictionary1 and:(NSDictionary *)dictionary2 { NSSet *set1 = [NSSet setWithArray:[dictionary1 allKeys]]; NSSet *set2 = [NSSet ...


2

You can use ANY and IN clause NSArray *tags = ...; [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@"ANY tags.name IN %@",tags]


2

You could try the following, assuming the goal was to check if the array contains an image named "White". Notice that UIImage -imageNamed: does not require the extension if ([imageOneArray containsObject:[UIImage imageNamed:@"White"]]) { //DO SOMETHING }


2

Yes they can not be saved like this in NSUserDefaults I am writing a code below please have a look and for more study go look apple docs okay. Code is here :- //For Saving NSData *dataSave = [NSKeyedArchiver archivedDataWithRootObject:yourArrayToBeSave]]; [[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] setObject:dataSave forKey:@"array"]; [[NSUserDefaults ...


2

It looks like your original dictionary is a mapping of one large array to another large array. Dictionaries should be set up like this @{@"key": @"object", @"otherKey": @"otherObject"}; And it will log like this: { key = object; otherKey = otherObject; } The parentheses give it away that you have a single array on each side of the mapping. You have ...


2

You've put that code at global or file scope, outside of any function or method definition. You can't do that. The second assignment to my_var is only valid inside a function or method body. Outside of a function/method body, the compiler thinks the second line is another variable declaration, with a (default) type of int. You can't initialize my_var to ...


2

If you want to sort using custom logic, you could use - (NSArray *)sortedArrayUsingComparator:(NSComparator)cmptr method on NSArray which takes a block with sorting logic and returns a sorted array. Example: sortedArray = [arrayWithObjects sortedArrayUsingComparator:^NSComparisonResult(id obj1, id obj2) { // cast obj1, obj2 to appropriate classes ...


1

The problem here is that you're trying to get a "valueForKey", which means you've incorrectly declared your "array" which actually needs to be a "NSDictionary" object. NSArray does not have keys. NSDictionary does.


1

"enumerating by group"; If you want exactly as stated, you can subclass NSEnumerator. For example: In your Application code: #import "NSArray+SubarrayEnumerator.h" NSArray *arr = ...; for(NSArray *grp in [arr subarrayEnumeratorEach:10]) { // do what you want. } NSArray+SubarrayEnumerator.h #import <Foundation/Foundation.h> @interface ...


1

No it is not possible in Objective-C with in-built functions which matches your exact description. There are crude ways to do it by loops which matches your exact description. But if you are aware before hand that you are going to make such type of operations, define your own data-structure. Create an NSObject sub-class, define your items (10 items which ...


1

something like this: for (int i = 0; i < arr.count; i++) { [self doSomethingWithArray]; if (i % 10 == 0) [self doSomethingElse]; }


1

- (void)doStuff{ UIImage * const targetImage = [UIImage imageNamed:@"White"]; for (UIImage *currentImage in someArray /*replace someArray with your own*/) { if ([self image:targetImage isEqualTo:currentImage]) { // Do stuff break; } } } - (BOOL)image:(UIImage * const)firstImage isEqualTo:(UIImage * ...


1

You've got a couple of problems in the code. Firstly "=" is an assignment e.g. myName = Joe whereas "==" is comparison 1 == 1 (true) 1 == 2 (false) Secondly, an array contains multiple objects, so you would have to go through and compare each one (or use the containsObject method other answers include). You frequently would do that with a For ...


1

You cab use containObject in the Array -containsObject: compares the objects using -isEqual:, which is usually what you want: e.g., two NSString objects containing the same UNICODE characters would be considered equal, even if they are not the same object.


1

NSString* str = @"[90, 5, 6]"; NSCharacterSet *c = [NSCharacterSet characterSetWithCharactersInString:@"[] "]; NSArray *array = [[[str componentsSeparatedByCharactersInSet:characterSet] componentsJoinedByString:@""] componentsSeparatedByString:@","];


1

Your check can still be out of the array range : if(matc.count > 0) { NSLog(@"%@",[array objectAtIndex:0]); //not 1 }


1

You just need to use standard sort or sorted functions provided by Swift: var results: [BPMonitor] = [] var sortedResults = sorted(results, { $0.datePress.compare($1.datePress) == NSComparisonResult.OrderedDescending })


1

You have your URL response as an instance of NSData. So you can parse it and loop through your received array: NSArray *JSONArray = [NSJSONSerialization JSONObjectWithData:responseData options:0 error:nil]; for(NSDictionary *entry in JSONArray) { NSLog(@"CONVCOLL: %@", [entry objectForKey:@"CONVCOLL"]); }



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible