Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

Yes they can not be saved like this in NSUserDefaults I am writing a code below please have a look and for more study go look apple docs okay. Code is here :- //For Saving NSData *dataSave = [NSKeyedArchiver archivedDataWithRootObject:yourArrayToBeSave]]; [[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] setObject:dataSave forKey:@"array"]; [[NSUserDefaults ...


14

Replace every [String] with [NSString], just like this: var food : [NSString] { get { var returnValue: [NSString]? = NSUserDefaults.standardUserDefaults().objectForKey("food") as? [NSString] if returnValue == nil //Check for first run of app { returnValue = ["muesli", "banana"] //Default value } return returnValue! } set ...


14

You can either use Swift's built in sort functions or, since a Swift array is bridged to NSArray you can call sortedArrayUsingComparator from swift directly. Using Swift's sorted function: var sortedArray = sorted(persons) { (obj1, obj2) in // The downcast to Person is only needed if persons is an NSArray or a Swift Array of AnyObjects let p1 ...


13

You are better off using this syntax to set the variables if let tempNames: NSArray = NSUserDefaults.standardUserDefaults().arrayForKey("names") { names = tempNames.mutableCopy() as NSMutableArray }


11

You just need to use standard sort or sorted functions provided by Swift: var results: [BPMonitor] = [] var sortedResults = sorted(results, { $0.datePress.compare($1.datePress) == NSComparisonResult.OrderedDescending })


9

-(NSArray *)convertStringArrayToNumberArray:(NSArray *)strings { return [strings valueForKeyPath:@"self.integerValue"]; } I test NSArray * array = @[@"1",@"2",@"3"]; NSArray *num = [self convertStringArrayToNumberArray:array]; And result


8

As stated in the documentation: For NSArray and NSDictionary objects, their contents must be property list objects. This means you need to convert your String objects to NSString when saving, something like this should work: var food : [String] { get { var returnValue : [String]? = ...


8

Here is one of the basic use of NSPredicate for filtering array . NSMutableArray *array = [NSMutableArray arrayWithObjects:@"Nick", @"Ben", @"Adam", @"Melissa", @"arbind", nil]; NSPredicate *sPredicate = [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@"SELF contains[c] 'b'"]; NSArray *beginWithB = [array filteredArrayUsingPredicate:sPredicate]; NSLog(@"beginwithB = ...


8

What about this? let arr = [kLMEnglish] In ObjC you could also write: NSArray *arr = @[kLMEnglish];


7

The first way is preferred. Not only because it is "modern" (which doesn't mean much), shorter and less error prone. There is a subtle problem with initWithObjects: If you manage to include an object pointer that is actually nil, then initWithObjects will use this as the trailing nil pointer, while the literal syntax will throw an exception. NSString* ...


7

Here is a sample code with example: NSDictionary *dictionaryA1 = @{@"ID":@"1", @"Name":@"NameA1", @"Author":@"AuthorA1"}; NSDictionary *dictionaryA2 = @{@"ID":@"2", @"Name":@"NameA2", @"Author":@"AuthorA2"}; NSDictionary *dictionaryA3 = @{@"ID":@"3", @"Name":@"NameA3", @"Author":@"AuthorA3"}; NSDictionary *dictionaryB0 = @{@"bookID":@"0", ...


7

cardImageString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"myGrabbedImage%@.png", @(card)];


7

-indexOfObject: returns an integer of type NSUInteger, not an object reference. Therefore you should not use po (print object) debugger command, but p. It returns 0, not nil, what means that it found the object at the first position of the array. If it would not find the object, -indexOfObject: would return NSNotFound. The lowest index whose ...


6

Transformable attributes are the correct way to persist otherwise unsupported object values in Core Data (such as NSArray). From Core Data Programming Guide: Non-Standard Persistent Attributes: The idea behind transformable attributes is that you access an attribute as a non-standard type, but behind the scenes Core Data uses an instance of ...


6

The firstObject and lastObject are properties of NSArray. You can't use it as subscript. Either use it as: ViewController *masterViewController = (ViewController *) [arrayViewControllers firstObject]; VideoViewController *detailVideoViewController = (VideoViewController *) [arrayViewControllers lastObject]; or: ViewController ...


5

You can make an array into a string, and save it, like this: NSString *fileContent = [myArrayContent componentsJoinedByString: @"\n"]; [fileContent writeToFile:filePath atomically:YES]; Reading back is done like this: NSArray *myArrayContent = [ [NSString stringWithContentsOfFile:filePath encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding error:nil] ...


5

The structure of NSArray is more complicated than just simple inheritance from NSObject, because NSArray is a class cluster. You can find more about class clusters at https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/general/conceptual/CocoaEncyclopedia/ClassClusters/ClassClusters.html


5

First remove the unwanted characters from the string, like white spaces and braces: NSString* str = @"[90, 5, 6]"; NSCharacterSet* characterSet = [[NSCharacterSet characterSetWithCharactersInString:@"0123456789,"] invertedSet]; NSString* newString = [[str componentsSeparatedByCharactersInSet:characterSet] ...


5

You cannot rely on the results of description as it is not a convert to string operator, but merely a debugging aid. There is nothing to stop it changing between O/S releases and there is no equivalent fromDescription method. The conventional way of serializing an Objective-C collection to and from a string is to use JSON, so look at the ...


5

cellHeights is an array containing non-optional CGFloat. So any of its elements cannot be nil, as such if the index exists, the element on that index is a CGFloat. What you are trying to do is something that is possible only if you create an array of optionals: var cellHeights: [CGFloat?] = [CGFloat?]() and in that case the optional binding should be ...


5

What are you looking for is NSDictionary. NSArray is accessible via indexes: 0, 1, 2 etc: NSDictionary could be accessed like dict[@"key"] or [dict objectForKey:@"key"]; So, accessing NSArray would be: for( int i = 0; i < [someArray count]-1; i++) { NSLog(@"%@", someArray[i]); } while accessing your NSDictionary would be: for (NSString* key in ...


5

You cannot pass an array to the predicate API like that. However, you can pass an array of IDs, and use the IN operator, which should be sufficient in your specific case: NSArray *arrayOfWantedWidgetIds = @[@1, @3, @5, @6, @9, @13, @14, @16]; NSMutableArray *allWidgets = [[WidgetManager sharedWidget] getAllWidgets]; NSPredicate *predicate = [NSPredicate ...


5

NSString *finalString = [array componentsJoinedByString:@"|"];


5

It only depends on how you want to ADD, STORE and REMOVE this data. First Let us go through each type of Data Structure that is available to us in Objective-C: Primitive Array This is the most basic type of storage in Objective-C(or C) which is used to store primitives. Ex: int a[4] = {1, 2, 3, 4}; The limitation to this is Can only store primitive ...


5

Just use -viewForHeaderInSection: or -tableView:titleForHeaderInSection: it will make your code much more readable, because using cellForRowAtIndexPath: your code will have indexPath offsets, and you will need to make additional calculations for catching selected row.


5

NSUserDefaults can store NSMutableArrays, but will turn them into immutable arrays. Same goes for NSDictionary and NSMutableDictionary. That means if you want to add an object to an array that you just extracted from the NSUserDefaults, you will have to first make it mutable first, using -copy for example, or -initWithArray. NSArray *array = [userDefault ...


5

You're overstepping the bounds by going right up to the count as an index. Change the loop to: for (int i = 0; i < self.myArray.count; i++) Notice the change from <= to <. If an array has three elements, the indices will be 0, 1, 2 and the count will be 3. Therefore, looping from 0 to the count will result in counting 0, 1, 2, 3; where 3 is ...


5

addObject works on NSMutableArray, not on NSArray, which is immutable. If you have control over the array that you create, make shoppingList NSMutableArray: NSMutableArray *shoppingList = [@[@"Eggs", @"Milk"] mutableCopy]; [shoppingList addObject:flour]; // Works with NSMutableArray Otherwise, use less efficient shoppingList = [shoppingList ...


4

Try using valueForKey: instead of objectForKey:. The latter belongs to NSDictionary whereas the former to any NSObject descendant


4

Try using nested for loops, ex: for (int i = 0 ; i < array.count ; i ++) { for (int j = i + 1 ; j < array.count ; j ++) { // compare array[i] to array [j] } } Edit: And although wottle's suggestion would work, I'd recommend mine in this case, since it won't waste iterations going over the same comparisons multiple times. What I've ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible