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42

If you need this so timers still run when you scroll your views (or maps), you need to schedule them on different event loop (not the main/UI thread). Replace your current timer: [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:0.5 target:self selector:@selector(timerFired:) ...


21

If you want to go pure GCD and use a dispatch source, Apple has some sample code for this in their Concurrency Programming Guide: dispatch_source_t CreateDispatchTimer(uint64_t interval, uint64_t leeway, dispatch_queue_t queue, dispatch_block_t block) { dispatch_source_t timer = dispatch_source_create(DISPATCH_SOURCE_TYPE_TIMER, 0, 0, queue); if ...


12

The harshest criticisms of synchronous network requests are reserved for those who do it from the main queue (as we know that one should never block the main queue). But you're doing it on your own background queue, which addresses the most egregious problem with synchronous requests. But you're losing some wonderful features that asynchronous techniques ...


12

I am not an expert in NSOperation or NSOperationQueues but I think below code is a bit better although I think it has some caveats still. Probably enough for some purposes but is not a general solution for concurrency: - (NSOperation *)executeBlock:(void (^)(void))block inQueue:(NSOperationQueue *)queue ...


6

This is the tutorial about "How to access all images from iPhonePhoto Library using ALAsset Library and show them on UIScrollView like iPhoneSimulator" . First of all add AssetsLibrary.framework to your project. Then in your viewController.h file import #import <AssetsLibrary/AssetsLibrary.h> header file. This is your viewController.h file #import ...


6

Use typedef: typedef NSImage *(^KWResizerBlock)(CGFloat size, BOOL preview); This makes your code become: - (KWResizerBlock) resizeBlock { KWResizerBlock block = ^(CGFloat size, BOOL preview){ // image-resizing code return [[[NSImage alloc] init] autorelease]; }; return [[block copy] autorelease]; } -(void)queueResize:(CGFloat)targetSize ...


6

You should not be creating a new NSOperationQueue for each executeBlock:completion: call. This is expensive and the user of this API has no control over how many operations can execute at a time. If you are returning NSOperation instances then you should leave it up to the caller to decide which queue to add them to. But at that point, your method really ...


4

you have declare searchOperation as __weak to avoid retain cycle: __weak NSBlockOperation *searchOperation; NSBlockOperation *tmp = [NSBlockOperation blockOperationWithBlock:^{ if (searchOperation.isCancelled) return; }]; searchOperation = tmp; Another possible solution: set searchOperation to nil inside the block after you used it.


4

This should work, It repeats a method every 1 second in a background queue without using NSTimers :) - (void)methodToRepeatEveryOneSecond { // Do your thing here // Call this method again using GCD dispatch_queue_t q_background = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_BACKGROUND, 0); double delayInSeconds = 1.0; ...


4

The timer would need to be installed into a run loop operating on an already-running background thread. That thread would have to continue to run the run loop to have the timer actually fire. And for that background thread to continue being able to fire other timer events, it would need to spawn a new thread to actually handle events anyway (assuming, of ...


4

No. GCD (which NSOperationQueue is built on top of as of OS X 10.6 or iOS 4.2) manages autorelease pools for you, the same way that NSRunLoop does.


4

You have a line in your DisplayImages NSOperation subclass where you update the UI (DisplayImages.m line 54): self.imageView.image = topicImage; This operation queue is running on a background thread, and we know that you should only update the state of the UI on the main thread. Since updating the view of an image view is definitely updating the UI, this ...


2

self, weakSelf, and strongSelf all refer to the same object in memory. That means that if you send a message to self in dealloc (which you do by setting that property), weakSelf and strongSelf also "know" about this updated property. So, yes, you are setting self.isCancelled (more than likely the actual property's name is self.cancelled and its getter is ...


2

Use NSRunLoop and NSTimer for work NSTimer *timer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:1 target:self selector:@selector(timer) userInfo:nil repeats:NO]; [[NSRunLoop mainRunLoop] addTimer:timer forMode:NSRunLoopCommonModes];


2

You can't use addExecutionBlock: to add an execution block while the operation is running or has already completed. That's all it means.


2

Add your reload data call to yet another NSOperation, which has as its dependencies (see addDependency:) the other five operations. It will then not be executed until the others are complete. Be sure to wrap your UI calls in a GCD dispatch to the main thread. From the NSOperation reference: Dependencies are a convenient way to execute operations in a ...


1

A block operation object can have zero or more execution blocks associated with it. When the block operation is started, all of its associated execution blocks are submitted for concurrent execution. The warning is that you can't add more execution blocks to the operation after this point. You can create more block operation objects and add execution blocks ...


1

From the perspective of someone who's done a lot of network development and written a book on it (http://www.amazon.com/Professional-iOS-Network-Programming-Connecting/dp/1118362403) this code seems overly complex for what you're trying to do. In general, when I start layering concurrency APIs, alarms start going off. First off: you don't need the ...


1

Unless you have a specific need for timers, you can use Grand Central Dispatch. The following snippet will execute a block after 2 seconds, on the default priority concurrent queue (i.e a background thread). You can change the priority of the queue if you see fit, but unless you're dealing with lots of different operations on concurrent queues, default will ...


1

I'm not following your logic for making the NSBlockOperation object strong. It should generally be weak. If the operation completes, there's no reason to keep the operation object any more. In answer to the question on your memory consumption, you're running out of memory because you undoubtedly have a strong reference cycle (a.k.a. retain cycle). If the ...


1

I did further research and found that * I must re-create the NSBlockOperation object per each 'addOperation' *, since NSOperationQueue refuses to re-queue the SAME NSOperation object. Hence the following solution: - (IBAction)segmentedAction:(UISegmentedControl *)sender { switch (sender.selectedSegmentIndex) { case START: ...


1

My guess you are using your code in the wrong manner. First, each thread must have its own context. So, inside the block operation you need to create a new context and use it within that block. NSManagedObjectContext *blockContext = [[NSManagedObjectContext alloc] init]; [blockContext setPersistentStoreCoordinator:[managedObjectContext ...



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