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13

To solve this, override this method on NSTableView: @interface NSResponder (NSControlEditingSupport) /* This is a responder chain method to allow controls to determine when they should become first responder or not. Some controls, such as NSTextField, should only become first responder when the enclosing NSTableView/NSBrowser indicates that the view can ...


7

You can call: [myPopupButton selectItemAtIndex:0] See here for details.


6

You can use NSWindow's keyWindow property, and if you want to check to see if your control is the first responder for keyboard events also test [[self window] firstResponder] == self. I don't believe keyWindow supports KVO, but there is a NSWindowDidBecomeKeyNotification and NSWindowDidResignKeyNotification you can listen for. For instance, - ...


4

You'll need to get complete: called on the text field's field editor at some point. That's what triggers the completions menu, but it doesn't get called automatically. If you don't have F5 bound to anything, try typing in your field and hit that. Completion should trigger then; Option-Esc may also work. If you want auto completion, it takes some work. You ...


4

Hopefully you've set the nextKeyView either programatically or in Xcode's interface builder, like so:


3

The bad selector being sent, screenFontWithRenderingMode, is a method on NSFont. I'm betting that you shouldn't be setting a color for the value of the key NSFontAttributeName. You should probably give it a font.


3

First, note that NSCell mostly exists because of performance issues from the NeXT days. There has been a slow migration away from NSCell, and you generally shouldn't create new ones unless you need to interact with something that demands them (such as working with an NSMatrix, or if you're doing something that looks a lot like an NSMatrix). Note the changes ...


2

The behavior is correct. Your expectation that all mouse-up events go through responder methods is mistaken. When the button is enabled, the superclass implementation of -mouseDown: will run an internal event tracking loop to track the mouse movement and show the button as pressed so long as the mouse is within it and show it as not pressed when the mouse ...


2

See Visual guide of AppKit controls? for an explanation of how to explore this question. This is called IDEActivityView. It is not a public class.


2

Set a breakpoint in onComboBoxSelection: and look at the backtrace when it's called the second time (type bt in the debugger to see the backtrace). That will explain what's going. A combo box is both a text field and a popup, and it will fire actions for both. The text field action is fired when editing ends, either by hitting the Return key or when it ...


1

Subclass NSLevelIndicator and write your own - (void)drawRect:(NSRect)theRect #import <Cocoa/Cocoa.h> @interface PBLevelIndicator : NSLevelIndicator { unsigned int mPercent; } @end #import "PBLevelIndicator.h" @implementation PBLevelIndicator - (void)drawRect:(NSRect)theRect { NSRect fillingRect = theRect; ...


1

When argument is 0 it means nil, and that works. If you put other number (for example 2 ) this will not work because the argument is not number!!!


1

I think you should probably be looking for NSPredicateEditor rather than NSRuleEditor. NSPredicateEditor is a subclass of NSRuleEditor and is what is used for editing "smart" playlists and the such. Apple's Documentation: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Reference/NSPredicateEditor_class/Reference/NSPredicateEditor.html Sample ...


1

I ended up implementing my own mouse tracking mechanism: // MyControl.m: - (void)mouseDown:(NSEvent *)theEvent { int currentCellIndex = [self indexOfCellAtPoint:[self convertPoint:[theEvent locationInWindow] fromView:nil]]; if (currentCellIndex < [cells count]) { MKListCell *cell = [cells objectAtIndex:currentCellIndex]; ...


1

Embed you NSSlider in NSView. Subclass NSView and catch mouse move event @interface PBView : NSView { id delegate; } @property (assign)id delegate; @end @implementation PBView @synthesize delegate; -(void) mouseMoved: (NSEvent *) thisEvent { NSPoint cursorPoint = [ thisEvent locationInWindow ]; [delegate sliderValueChanged]; } - ...


1

The following code does what you want using NSTextFieldDelegate> methods: @interface HASMainViewController () <NSTextFieldDelegate> @property (weak) IBOutlet NSTextField *widthTextField; @property (weak) IBOutlet NSTextField *heightTextField; @property (weak) IBOutlet NSTextField *ratioLabel; @end @implementation HASMainViewController - ...


1

Seems like it was my fault. I was incorporating delegate calls within the custom class for textDidBeginEditing: and textDidEndEditing:, in order to maintain the placeholder text when the user tabs out of the field, but I wasn't calling the respective super class' methods as well. After including the call to [super textDidEndEditing...] and [super ...


1

One approach is to use KVO. In particular, add the ButtonText instance as an observer of buttonField's stringValue. In more detail, in your file ButtonText, once the @property IBOutlet buttonField has been set (i.e. if ButtonText is an NSWindowController subclass, in -windowDidLoad, and if ButtonText is an NSViewController subclass in -loadView), call ...


1

NSSlider is what you probable want.


1

You can override becomeFirstResponder: and in your implementation call setKeyEquivalent:. If you want to remove the key equivalent when the button loses first responder status, override resignFirstResponder:.


1

if someone is still looking for this ... I don't know why but this works for me ... - (void)mouseDown:(NSEvent *)theEvent { NSLog(@"mouse down!"); [super mouseDown:theEvent]; NSLog(@"mouse up!"); }



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