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0

Simple in iOS 7 onwards - (UIImage *)decodeBase64ToImage:(NSString *)strEncodeData { NSData *data = [[NSData alloc]initWithBase64EncodedString:strEncodeData options:NSDataBase64DecodingIgnoreUnknownCharacters]; return [UIImage imageWithData:data]; } UIImage *zeroImage = [[UIImage alloc]init]; if(![strb64Image isEqualToString:@""] && ...


0

This will work for ios7 and above. - (UIImage *)decodeBase64ToImage:(NSString *)strEncodeData { NSData *data = [[NSData alloc]initWithBase64EncodedString:strEncodeData options:NSDataBase64DecodingIgnoreUnknownCharacters]; return [UIImage imageWithData:data]; } And use the code like this: UIImage *img = [self decodeBase64ToImage:<ur base64 ...


1

You cant assign NSData to NSString directly, you have to convert the NSData to NSString like this NSString *dataString = [[NSString alloc] initWithData:data1 encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding]; Check updated code NSString *string = @"This is a string"; NSData *data1 = [string dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding]; NSLog(@"data: %@",data1); NSString ...


0

Convert data to string :- NSData *data ; NSLog(@"data is :%@",data); NSString *strr = [[NSString alloc]initWithData:data encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding]; NSLog(@"Responce is : %@",strr); Now convert string to data :- NSData *dataa = [strr dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding]; NSLog(@"data is :%@",dataa); 2015-09-04 12:43:54.502 ...


1

Replace your code like this : NSString *string = @"This is a string"; NSData *data1 = [string dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding]; NSLog(@"data: %@",data1); NSString *dataString = [NSString stringWithUTF8String:[data1 bytes]]; NSData* data2 = [dataString dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding]; NSLog(@"data2: %@",data2); Output: ...


1

When you save the array, you save the array itself: [userData setObject:archiveArray forKey:@"mainScreenFavVenues"]; When you read it, you try to read an instance of NSData and unarchive that: NSData *data = [defaults objectForKey:@"mainScreenFavVenues"]; _venuesInfo = (NSArray *)[NSKeyedUnarchiver unarchiveObjectWithData:data]; This does not work, ...


0

I think converting deviceToken to hex byte string has no sense. Why? You will send it to your backend, where it will be transformed back to bytes to be pushed to APNS. So, use NSData's method base64EncodedStringWithOptions, push it to server, and then use reverse base64decoded data :) That is so much easier :) NSString *tokenString = [tokenData ...


0

The easiest way to do that: UIWebView *webview = [[UIWebView alloc] init]; [self.view addSubview:webview]; NSString *path = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"pdfFileName" ofType:@"pdf"]; NSURL *targetURL = [NSURL fileURLWithPath:path]; NSURLRequest *request = [NSURLRequest requestWithURL:targetURL]; [webview loadRequest:request];


2

You may want to check out RawData which is really new and this guy just experimented a bit with this idea, so don't think that it's tested well or anything, some function aren't even implemented yet. It's basically a Swift-y wrapper around (you guessed it) raw data, a series of bytes. Using this extension, you can initialise it with an NSData instance: ...


1

You must not write anything at runtime into the application bundle. That will break the code signature of the application.


1

Use imageWithData: method, which gets translated to Swift as UIImage(data:) let image : UIImage = UIImage(data: imageData)


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UIImage(data:imageData,scale:1.0) presuming the image's scale is 1.


0

try this if ((dataImage != NULL) && ![v isKindOfClass:[NSNull class]]) { } Nothing worked in my case besides this.


0

I'm responding to the Martijn Thé thread above, here, as I couldn't put a readable code snippet in the comments. I found that if on the server , the response content type is set to 'text/plain', then (__bridge CFStringRef) [response textEncodingName] will be null, and if you try to pass this to CFStringConvertIANACharSetNameToEncoding you will get an ...


1

Answer in swift, XCode beta 6 let string = "600DBEEF" let length = string.characters.count let rawData = UnsafeMutablePointer<CUnsignedChar>.alloc(length/2) var rawIndex = 0 for var index = 0; index < length; index+=2{ let single = NSMutableString() ...


0

I hope it helps you, public func resizeImage(width width: CGFloat, height: CGFloat) -> UIImage { let newSize: CGRect = CGRectMake(0, 0, width, height) UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(newSize.size) self.drawInRect(newSize) let resizedImage: UIImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext() UIGraphicsEndImageContext() return ...


0

Swift Image Resizer import UIKit func RBSquareImageTo(image: UIImage, size: CGSize) -> UIImage { return RBResizeImage(RBSquareImage(image), size) } func RBSquareImage(image: UIImage) -> UIImage { var originalWidth = image.size.width var originalHeight = image.size.height var edge: CGFloat if originalWidth > ...


1

I was doing some image manipulation and came across your question on SO. Seems like no one else came up with an answer, so here's my theory. While it's theoretically possible to convert a CGImageRef back to NSData in the manner that you described, the data itself is invalid and not a real JPEG or PNG, as you discovered by it not being readable. So I don't ...


1

if([[self.imageArray objectAtIndex:i] isKindOfClass:[NSString class]]) { NSString *stringFromAPI = [self.imageArray objectAtIndex:i]; NSURL *url=[NSURL URLWithString:stringFromAPI]; image = [UIImage imageWithData:[NSData dataWithContentsOfURL:url]]; }else { image = ...


0

Yeah check your array with breakpoint. It contains string and not an image. The exception is itself explanatory.


3

Try This for (int i=0; i<self.imageArray.count; i++) { UIImage *image; if([[self.imageArray objectAtIndex:i] isKindOfClass:[NSString class]]){ image = [UIImage imageNamed:[self.imageArray objectAtIndex:i]]; }else{ image = [self.imageArray objectAtIndex:i]; } [self.operation addData:[self getDataFromImage:image] ...


1

If you are working with Swift 2, you should not pass the last argument "error". Instead put a try around the NSData initialization. If data needs to be accessed outside take the init result in a var and convert to let Modified code var optData:NSData? = nil do { optData = try NSData(contentsOfURL: dataURL!, options: ...


1

You can do it like this since in the end it is a float value. Encoding: NSMutableData * data = [NSMutableData dataWithCapacity:0]; [data appendBytes:&yourfloatvalue length:sizeof(float)]; Decoding: NSData * data = ...; // loaded from bluetooth float yourfloatvalue; [data getBytes:&yourfloatvalue length:sizeof(float)]; If you don't want to use ...


1

In didReceiveResponse set the length of the NSMutableData instance to 0 func connection(connection: NSURLConnection!, didReceiveResponse response: NSURLResponse!) { if(connection == appoApiConnection) { appoApiData.length = 0 println("RESPONSE_APPO: \(response)") } } and delete appoApiData.setData(NSData())


0

NSString to the rescue: const unsigned char *bytes = [serverData bytes]; NSInteger aValue = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%2x", bytes[0]].integerValue; The docs warn about using NSScanner for localized decimal numbers, but that's of no concern in this case.


3

All code in this answer is pseudo-code fragments, you need to convert the algorithms into Objective-C or other language yourself. Your question raises many questions... You start with: I have an NSData object. I need to convert its bytes to a string and send as JSON. description returns hex and is unreliable (according to various SO posters). This ...


0

Your problem is in these three lines: NSURL *url = [item valueForProperty: MPMediaItemPropertyAssetURL]; NSString *audioFilePath = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@",url]; NSData *audioData = [NSData dataWithContentsOfFile:audioFilePath]; Try doing: NSURL *url = [item valueForProperty: MPMediaItemPropertyAssetURL]; NSError *error = nil; NSData ...


0

For unzipping the file from web use the below code. Dowbload ZipArchive.h and #import in your file. NSURL *urlVersion = [NSURL URLWithString: [tempDirOuter objectForKey:@"filename"]]; NSLog(@"txt File : %@",urlVersion); NSError *error = nil; // 2 ...


2

You could have your array be optional NSData like so: var images: [NSData?] = []; That way, you can set nil if you want: images.append(nil) And check on the loop: for imageData in images { if let data = imageData { // data exists } else { // data doesn't exist yet at this index } }


4

Make an array of optionals var images: [NSData?] = []; And add nil values when in for-loop images.append(nil) After that replace with your real data if you know position in array


2

Create an empty NSData instance and append it to the array var images: [NSData] = [] let emptyData = NSData() images.append(emptyData)


6

The reason the String is being considered 'unreliable' in previous Stack posts is because they too were attempting to use NSData objects where the ending bytes aren't properly terminated with NULL : NSString *jsonString = [NSString stringWithUTF8String:[nsDataObj bytes]]; // This is unreliable because it may result in NULL string values Whereas the ...


6

Have you tried using something like this: @implementation NSData (Base64) - (NSString *)base64EncodedString { return [self base64EncodedStringWithWrapWidth:0]; } This will turn your NSData in a base64 string, and on the other side you just need to decode it. EDIT: @Lucas said you can do something like this: NSString *myString = [[NSString alloc] ...


0

simple to use:- -(UIImage *)fireYourImageForCompression:(UIImage *)imgComing{ NSData *dataImgBefore = [[NSData alloc] initWithData:UIImageJPEGRepresentation((imgComing), 1.0)];//.1 BEFORE COMPRESSION int imageSizeBefore = (int)dataImgBefore.length; NSLog(@"SIZE OF IMAGE: %i ", imageSizeBefore); NSLog(@"SIZE OF IMAGE in Kb: %i ", ...


0

You should know the data type of the dataBytes array , then you have to convert accordingly. You can change the below data type(UInt32) and experiment in playground. Note - I have tried the below code with Xcode 7 beta 4 playground. var arr : [UInt32] = [32,4,123,4,5,2]; let dataBytes = NSData(bytes: arr, length: arr.count * sizeof(UInt32)) // let ...


1

I am not by any means qualified to explain what exactly happens during each render loop and why updateProgress doesn't actually let a screen render occur before you block the main thread again, but I am able to provide a solution. After you update the progress of the progress view, you want the changes to get rendered "right now". This means you have to ...


3

UI can only be executed on the main thread. Since the main thread is busy doing the downloading, it can't update the UI. It's almost never a good idea to perform any long running operations on the main thread. You should make the download asynchronous, and update the UI on the main thread. The loop in the code you posted will only be executed after lots of ...


1

If you get [24,68,69,70,71,72,73] from data, this data is a JSON array. You can use Foundation's NSJSONSerialization to decode the data and cast the result to either a Foundation object like an NSArray or to a Swift array of integers. Because it's Swift 2, NSJSONSerialization throws so you also have to use the do try catch syntax to handle errors. And ...



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