Hot answers tagged

48

You can do: NSDecimalNumber *decNum = [NSDecimalNumber decimalNumberWithDecimal:[aNumber decimalValue]];


25

You need to use the stringWithFormat function: NSString *typeId = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@", [obj objectForKey:@"TypeID"]]; or stringValue: NSString *typeId = [[obj objectForKey:@"TypeID"] stringValue];


20

You can't do what you want becuase neither C nor Objective C have operator overloading. Instead you have to write: - (NSDecimalNumber *)addThem { return [self.numOne decimalNumberByAdding: [self.numTwo decimalNumberByAdding:self.numThree]]; } If you're willing to play dirty with Objective-C++ (rename your source to .mm), then you could write: ...


19

My understanding is that you can only compare NSDecimalNumber and NSNumber objects using the compare: method. Super frustrating, but I believe it stems from Objective-C not supporting operator overloading. If it's becoming really difficult to read, you could always add a category with some helper methods to try and make it a little more readable, something ...


17

I'm using 2 for the scale since you said this was for currency but you may choose to use another rounding scale. I'm also ignoring any exceptions rounding may bring since this is a pretty simple example. NSDecimalNumberHandler *behavior = [NSDecimalNumberHandler decimalNumberHandlerWithRoundingMode:NSRoundDown scale:0 raiseOnExactness:NO raiseOnOverflow:NO ...


14

NSDecimalNumber subclasses NSNumber so you just need to use NSNumberFormatter NSDecimalNumber * dn = [NSDecimalNumber decimalNumberWithString:@"1234.5"]; NSNumberFormatter * nf = [[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init]; [nf setMinimumFractionDigits:2]; [nf setMaximumFractionDigits:2]; NSString *ns = [nf stringFromNumber:dn]; Simples


13

You could use NSDecimalNumber>>decimalNumberWithMantissa:exponent:isNegative to generate -1 more concisely. /* Answers (aDecimal x -1) */ NSDecimalNumber* negate(NSDecimalNumber *aDecimal) { return [aDecimal decimalNumberByMultiplyingBy: [NSDecimalNumber decimalNumberWithMantissa: 1 ...


13

NSDecimalNumber has following method which you can use to convert your NSString into it: + (NSDecimalNumber *)decimalNumberWithString:(NSString *)numericString For example: NSString *foo = @"1.0"; NSDecimalNumber *cow = [NSDecimalNumber decimalNumberWithString:foo]; Full reference of the class is available here: ...


12

The parameter must be an NSDecimalNumber too. NSDecimalNumber *half = [NSDecimalNumber decimalNumberWithString:@"0.5"]; b = [a decimalNumberBySubtracting:half]; In your example you're using a float. There are two reason that cannot work: Objective-C cannot distinguis a float and an object at runtime, meaning you cannot supply a float instead of an ...


10

This is a safer implementation which will work with values that do not fit into a double: @implementation NSDecimalNumber (centsStringAddition) - (NSString*) centsString; { NSDecimal value = [self decimalValue]; NSDecimal dollars; NSDecimalRound(&dollars, &value, 0, NSRoundPlain); NSDecimal cents; NSDecimalSubtract(&cents, &value, ...


9

NSString* cleanedString = [costString stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet: [NSCharacterSet symbolCharacterSet]]; Is a lot more robust than the one above (and I think it will handle commas, too)


9

Update: This is a relatively old answer, but it looks like people are still finding it. I want to update this for correctness — I originally answered the question as I did simply to demonstrate how one could pull out specific decimal places from a double, but I do not advocate this as a way to represent currency information. Never use floating-point numbers ...


9

The result for integerValue is surprising, but from what I understand as documented: NSDecimalNumber inherits from NSNumber. In the subclassing notes from NSNumber it is stated that "... subclass must override the accessor method that corresponds to the declared type—for example, if your implementation of objCType returns “i”, you must override intValue ...


8

NSDecimalNumber is an Objective C class which, when instantiated, produces an object which contains a number. You access the object (and objects in general) through methods only. Objective C doesn't have a way to directly express arithmetic against objects, so you need to make one of three calls: -[NSDecimalNumber doubleValue], which extracts the numbers ...


8

Remember, you can create your own NSAutoreleasePool objects. For example: for (int i = 0; i < 1000; ++i) { NSAutoreleasePool * p = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init]; for (int j = 0; j < 1000; ++j) { NSString * s = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d,%d", i, j]; NSLog(@"%@", s); } [p release]; } If you do that, you'll never have more than ...


8

No is the answer. Multiplication is a binary operation. Even int x = a * b * c; actually involves two separate multiplications. It looks less clunky because of the infix notation. You can do result = [[d1 decimalNumberByMultiplyingBy: d2] decimalNumberByMultiplyingBy: d3]; which is the equivalent to the first statement.


8

Do you mean: num1.compare(num2) == NSComparisonResult.OrderedSame


8

First, read Josh Caswell's link. It it especially critical when working with money. In your case it may matter or may not, depending on your goal. If you put in 65.1 and you want to get exactly 65.1 back out, then you definitely need to use a format that rounds properly to decimal values like NSDecimalNumber. If, when you put in 65.1, you want "a value that ...


7

You probably haven't read the documentation for decimalNumberWithMantissa:exponent:isNegative: The exponent is related to the multiple of 10 that the mantissa will have. You have to understand that the mantissa is the value on the right hand of the point. The normalization of the number turns a value like 18.23 = 0.1823x10^2 --> mantissa == 1823, exponent ...


7

Yes, creating lots of autoreleased instances on the iPhone can create memory problems, particularly in a tight loop, which is why I tend to avoid them when I can. You can create your own autorelease pools to manage this, but they also add some performance overhead and additional code that you have to keep track of. It is for this reason that when I do ...


7

Yes. The only possible issue might be code that checks that an argument is an instance of NSNumber, but since NSNumber is a class-cluster, code like this would have to check that the instance is a subclass of NSNumber, and NSDecimalNumber instances should pass the same tests. That's where isKindOfClass: comes in, although you may prefer to test whether ...


7

Simple solution: You can get the float value of the number object and call ceilf() or floorf(): ceilf([decimalNumber floatValue]); Otherwise, you can use the – decimalNumberByRoundingAccordingToBehavior: method. First you'll need to implement the NSDecimalNumberBehaviors protocol for each rounding mode you want to use: @interface DecimalRounder : ...


7

It sounds like it actually isn't a string you have there, if you are parsing json to get it it most likely is a NSNumber and not a NSString. All the JSON parsers I have tried so far converts numbers to NSNumber. I think a quick test to see could be to just change the property to NSNumber and then: [self md5:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@", userId]];


7

Your response contains all the image bytes as decimal numbers. (255,216 is FF,D8 in hex, which indicates the start of a JPEG image). The following code should work to create an UIImage from the array of numbers: NSArray *array = [datadic objectForKey:@"FaceImage"]; NSMutableData *imageData = [NSMutableData dataWithLength:[array count]]; uint8_t *imageBytes ...


6

Seems to work for me. NSDecimalNumber * n1 = [NSDecimalNumber decimalNumberWithString:@"65"]; NSDecimalNumber * n2 = [NSDecimalNumber decimalNumberWithString:@"2"]; NSDecimalNumber * res = [n1 decimalNumberByMultiplyingBy:n2]; NSLog(@"%@ * %@ = %@", n1, n2, res); Output: 2010-04-05 08:40:42.812 x[24301] 65 * 2 = 130


6

See NSDecimalAdd function (as well as NSDecimalMultiply, NSDecimalDivide, NSDecimalSubtract).


6

This appears to work well, and is more explicit: NSDictionary *l = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObject:@"." forKey:NSLocaleDecimalSeparator]; NSDecimalNumber *n = [NSDecimalNumber decimalNumberWithString:@"1.234" locale:l]; NSLocaleDecimalSeparator is a constant defined for NSLocale, which responds to -objectWithKey:, just like NSDictionary. You can ...


6

@interface NSDecimalNumber (IsIntegerNumber) @property (readonly) BOOL isIntegerNumber; @end @implementation NSDecimalNumber (IsIntegerNumber) -(BOOL)isIntegerNumber { NSDecimalValue value = [self decimalValue]; if (NSDecimalIsNotANumber(&value)) return NO; NSDecimal rounded; NSDecimalRound(&rounded, &value, 0, NSRoundPlain); ...


6

in Swift that can happen an easier way, like e.g. this: if num1 == num2 { println("They match") } BACKGROUND (extracted from Using Swift Cocoa and Objective-C APIs, Object Comparison section) Swift and Objective-C objects are typically compared in Swift using the == and === operators. Swift provides a default implementation of the == ...


5

OK, so i ended up using this code and it works for me NSString *inString = self.amountLabel.text; NSMutableString *outString = [NSMutableString stringWithCapacity:inString.length]; NSScanner *scanner = [NSScanner scannerWithString:inString]; NSCharacterSet *numbers = [NSCharacterSet characterSetWithCharactersInString:@".0123456789"]; ...



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