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10

Relationships are described by NSRelationshipDescription objects. The following code creates two entity descriptions for "MyCustomEntry", "MyCustomElement" with relationships entries (MyCustomElement --> MyCustomEntry, to-many), element (MyCustomEntry --> MyCustomElement, to-one), inverse of entries. Both entities have only a string attribute ...


9

you should not check for selectors. Imagine a key called entity or managedObjectContext. The NSManagedObject class definitely responds to those selectors, but the best thing that will happen if you try to assign something wrong to those is that your code crashes instantly. A little less luck and something like this destroys the complete core data file, and ...


6

Assuming you have access to a User *user instance, you could do: NSAttributeDescription *userIDAttribute = [[user.entity attributesByName] objectForKey:@"userID"]; If you didn't have access to a User *user object but just to the NSManagedObjectContext *context, you could get the NSEntityDescription for User with: NSEntityDescription *userEntity = ...


6

Your unit test target is not linking with the Core Data framework.


4

If you have a normal NSObject subclass, the description of the data and the actual data are in the same place, aren't they. No. The class is the description of the object and the instance is the object (including its data. Why then does Core Data separate the class which describes the data and the class which contains the data? Is it to do with ...


4

Sadly I know only of an UGLY solution for this issue. In your User .m file implements the setProfilePicture: like this: //NOT TESTED IN A MULTITHREADED ENV - (void) setProfilePicture:(NSData *)data { [self willChangeValueForKey:@"profilePicture"]; [self setPrimitiveValue:data forKey:@"profilePicture"]; [self.posts ...


3

It's theoretically possible, but doesn't appear very practical. You can modify the NSManagedObjectModel programmatically, as well as NSEntityDescription. Note that -setEntities: (NSManagedObjectModel) and -setProperties: (NSEntityDescription) both trigger exceptions if you modify a model that has been instantiated. So you can't modify your existing model's ...


3

Check this, BOOL hasFoo = [[myObject.entity propertiesByName] objectForKey:@"foo"] != nil;


3

insertNewObjectForEntityForName creates an instance of the entity and adds it to the context. The context is now dirty and needs to be saved. The returned instance is a subclass of NSManagedObject. entityForName returns the NSEntityDescription instance which describes the entity, what attributes and relationships it has, how they are constructed. The ...


3

General best practice, ANYTIME you run into a EXEC_BAD_ACCESS immediately run your code (and the same click/code path) through Instruments using the tool Zombies. Do this with that line of code uncommented. Your app will crash, but Instruments and Zombies will point you to the exact line of code that is causing the crash (which will be different than the ...


2

If you want to delete an Activities when it has no more ActivityRecords then... you have to delete the Activities. There is no way to automate this in Core Data. If you don't want to have any Activities objects with no related ActivityRecords, then you need to write your own code that deletes them. When you're going to delete an ActivityRecord, you need to ...


2

If the data models are the same, you can just setup your MOC so that it uses both persistent stores... one which is read-only and the other that is read/write. Or, you could use separate MOC for each store. So, how you want to use it is your only decision factor, since you can have almost any combination of MOC/PSC. Look at the documentation here for more ...


2

You'll need to create an NSFetchRequest to return the object you're interested in. The example below will return the instance of entity Metric for a given action: - (MetricDb *) metricWithAction: (NSString *) action { NSFetchRequest * request = [[[NSFetchRequest alloc] init] autorelease]; [request setEntity: [NSEntityDescription entityForName: ...


2

You should not use stringWithFormat to build a predicate. This will fail if the search strings (playlistID, songQuery) contains special characters, in particular if they contain a quote ". A much better and safer method is NSPredicate *predicate = [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@"ANY playlists.playlist_id =[cd] %@ AND name BEGINSWITH[c] %@", playlistID, ...


2

Assuming that the entities are defined as in Core Data Detail View with relationship, the following code establishes a relationship between the two objects: [routineEntityDetail setValue:routineEntity forKey:@"routineinfo"]; It sets the relationship pointer from routineEntityDetail to routineEntity. Since routinedet is the inverse relationship to ...


2

You can use the NSEntityDescription and NSPropertyDescription APIs to determine the kind of a modelled entity. I would enumerate through NSAttributeDescription's NSAttributeType constants switch (thisAttribute.attributeType) { case NSInteger16AttributeType: { /* do something */; } break; case NSDecimalAttributeType : { /* do something */; } break; ...


2

When you do this: [NSEntityDescription entityForName:@"trainingDay" inManagedObjectContext:self.context]; What you get is an instance of NSEntityDescription. This is an object that is equivalent to the entity type that you configured in the Core Data model editor in Xcode. It represents an entity type, not an instance of that entity. From the error ...


2

if you have declare in app delegate then you should check it like : if (managedObjectContext == nil) { managedObjectContext = [(YourAppDelegate *)[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate] managedObjectContext]; NSLog(@" %@", managedObjectContext); }


2

In the first line you're fetching the managedObjectModel from your app delegate and assigning it to an NSManagedObjectContext. You should fetch the managedObjectContext instead.


2

From your code, it is not clear what exactly you are assigning to managed object context. It should be a managed object context, not a managed object model. Also, you should check if (error!=nil) not &error. Read up on your C pointer syntax (;-).


2

In short you cannot mark an attribute as primary key automatically. You have maintain one by your own. You can do anyone of the below: Use -[NSManagedObject objectID]. Your own primary key-like system that stores an integer in your model and increments it with the creation of each object


2

For your particular case, I suppose you have each username as a separate record so you can use the -countForFetchRequest:error: method of NSManagedObjectContext to get the number of objects a given fetch request would have returned if it had been passed to executeFetchRequest:error:


1

I was able to complete the login process with the following code. - (IBAction)processLogin:(id)sender { // hide keyboard [_textFieldUsername resignFirstResponder]; [_textFieldPin resignFirstResponder]; // First - make activity indicator visible, then start animating, then turn of wrong user / pin label _welcomeActivityIndicator.hidden = FALSE; ...


1

The above code actually works perfectly. Someone overrode awakeFromInsert in the +Extras file, which was nulling out the values. Outsourcing code. Bad for your sanity. Cheers.


1

Here is what i've used, using looping for each record: - (void) copyEntities:(NSString *)sourceEntity And:(NSString *)destinationEntity { NSManagedObjectContext *context = [mainDelegate managedObjectContext]; NSEntityDescription *Units = [NSEntityDescription entityForName:sourceEntity inManagedObjectContext:context]; NSEntityDescription *BUnits = ...


1

Look again. csvString isn't mutable. You're creating an NSString. Creating an NSMutableString looks like this: NSMutableString *csvString = [NSMutableString string];


1

you alloc the sortDescriptor and sortDescriptors but not release them at end NSSortDescriptor *sortDescriptor = [[[NSSortDescriptor alloc] initWithKey:@"name" ascending:YES selector:@selector(localizedCaseInsensitiveCompare:)] autorelease]; NSArray *sortDescriptors = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:sortDescriptor, nil];


1

_PFEncodedString is a (private) concrete subclass of NSString and can therefore be used as any other NSString.


1

Immediately after the line NSEntityDescription *entityOrder = [NSEntityDescription entityForName:@"Order" inManagedObjectContext:managedObjectContext]; you then reassign it to the contents of first object of selectedObjects with entityOrder = [selectedObjects objectAtIndex:0]; The Xcode analyzer is letting you know that the first assignment is ...


1

Usually when you're using an NSTreeController to manage an NSOutlineView, the ‑selectedObjects method of NSTreeController should return an array of NSManagedObject instances. You can query those instances for their entities using the -entity method of NSManagedObject. However, the fact that you're called -representedObject (not an NSManagedObject method) ...



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