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29

When using Xcode 7 and purely Swift, I actually had to remove @objc(MyClass) from my auto-generated NSManagedObject subclass (generated from Editor > Create NSManagedObject Subclass...).


11

Remember to remove your module:


11

As of Xcode 7 and Swift 2.0 (see release note #17583057), you are able to just add the following definitions to the generated extension file: extension PersonModel { // This is what got generated by core data @NSManaged var name: String? @NSManaged var hairColor: NSNumber? @NSManaged var parents: NSSet? // This is what I manually added ...


9

In Xcode 7 beta 2 (and I believe 1), in the model configuration a new managed object of type File is set to the Module Current Product Module and the class of the object is shown in configuration as .File. Deleting the module setting so it is blank, or removing the full stop so the class name in configuration is just File are equivalent actions, as each ...


6

Core Data will automatically manage the other end of the relationship once you initiate it from either direction. You can either add to ChatUser's chat collection or set ChatMessage's chat with an instance of an NSManagedObject and that's all you have to do. Note that this process does not require you to manage foreign keys, that complexity is abstracted ...


4

The keys property of a dictionary returns a LazyForwardCollection which has to be converted to a real array. Another problem is that order is apparently an optional, so it needs to be unwrapped, e.g. with optional binding. if let theOrder = order { let keys = Array(theOrder.entity.attributesByName.keys) let dict = ...


4

Please note this solution assume we have a property called dateUpated in model . Instead of handling this at individual objects. I would handle this through a notification. Apple documentation also suggests this way as well. 1. Register for NSManagedObjectContextWillSaveNotification notification [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self ...


4

You simply update any property of Core data object and call save on NSManagedObjectContext. You can also check for any changes with hasChanges method. managedObject.setValue("newValue", forKey: "propertyName") Update your object like above or direct call assignment and do the following if let moc = self.managedObjectContext { var error: NSError? = ...


4

I figured it out how to fix this error after much research. (No help in from the Apple Dev forums). This is error is caused by the Swift 1.2 upgrade. They encourage you to use their new Set<> class instead of NSSet. The error was a vague way of reinforcing that claim. Ordering of my data was ultimately handled by my NSFetchedResultsController, so I ...


4

Yes-- delete the @NSManaged. It's not absolutely required, but if you delete it you unfortunately need to implement get and set for the property. You would need to add something like public var newData: String? { set { self.willChangeValueForKey("newData") self.setPrimitiveValue(newValue, forKey: "newData") ...


4

This may help those experiencing the same problem. I was, with Swift 2 and Xcode 7 beta 2. The solution in my case was to comment out @objc(EntityName) in EntityName.swift.


4

Three remarks at the very beginning: A. You should care about efficiency when you have a runtime problem. "Premature optimization is the root of all evil." (Donald Knuth) B. Who said that all passenger entities has to be fetched? You think of something like this … [bus.passengers count] … causing passengers to be fetched. But Core Data supports ...


4

When I had this issue, it was because I had forgotten to set the "class" on the entity. This is what I came up with: Click on .xcdatamodelId file in your file structure/project navigator pane (far left). Select the entity that you are having issues with. In the Utilities pane (far right), look for the icon that looks like a 1997 cell phone, the Data ...


4

I doubt you need custom objects between Core Data and your UI. There is a better answer: Your UI should read from the managed objects that are associated with the main thread (which it sounds like you are doing). When you make changes on another thread those changes will update the objects that are on your main thread. That is what Core Data is designed ...


4

Go to your data model file, select the relationship, and on the right side panel select the Delete Rule Cascade Also, this page can help you understand core data better


3

It seems that you have a one to many relationship between List and items: List <-->>Items that mean one list can have many items but one item can have just one list. But you want the items to be able to belong to many lists, so you need to create a many to many relationship between list and items List <<-->>Items In this case ...


3

Instead of casting the object as NSManagedObject, use your data model. If Appointments is your date model then try this, let managedObject = frc.objectAtIndexPath(indexPath) as! Appointments removeImage(managedObject.appointmentImage)


3

here's a simple example in Swift: NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().addObserverForName(NSManagedObjectContextObjectsDidChangeNotification, object: nil, queue: nil) { note in if let updated = note.userInfo?[NSUpdatedObjectsKey] where updated.count > 0 { print("updated: \(updated)") } if let deleted = ...


2

This was tested On IOS7, IOS8. Create tmp NSManagedContext : To make sure that your NSManagedObject will not be nil when your context will be dealloc create a temporary NSManagedContext in your Application delegate. in file AppDelegate.swift import UIKit import CoreData @UIApplicationMain class AppDelegate: UIResponder, UIApplicationDelegate { ...


2

We hit into a a similar issue when using a private managed object context inside an NSOperation and we ended up working around it by weakifying any parameters and using a private @autoreleasepool. I'll elaborate further below. Our current set up has an NSOperationQueue which has a long running calculation we do in the background. The operation first creates ...


2

Category is created for expanding, not for overriding or modifying. So we cannot assure whether it override or be overridded. In your case, instead of use Category, you should create a parent class which subclass NSManagedObject. Then put below method to parent class. - (NSDictionary *)JSONToCreateObjectOnServer { @throw [NSException ...


2

The fundamental issue turns out to be that the fancy accessor examples in the Apple Docs that you were using as a reference are actually not all the accessors for the relationship. They are extra convenience accessors that you can implement if you want. But because you are trying to insert your code by overriding all the setters (or whatever you want to ...


2

This is fundamental to using iCloud, or really any sync mechanism. If your app creates the same instance on multiple devices, and can't sit around waiting to see if it already exists from a different device, then you'll get duplicates. The only way to handle this is to let the duplicates happen and then clean them up. With iCloud, you do the cleanup when ...


2

There are two approaches to setting the context: Calling back to the App Delegate:, like this let appDelegate : AppDelegate = UIApplication.sharedApplication().delegate as AppDelegate let context = appDelegate.managedObjectContext! or passing the context forward from the App Delegate to the Master View Controller, which then passes it on to any ...


2

You can't directly pass managed objects between contexts. Each NSManagedObject can only be accessed by its own context. You'll need to pass its objectID to the completion block, then have the main context fetch the object by calling one of the following methods: -(NSManagedObject *)objectWithID:(NSManagedObjectID *)objectID This will create a fault to ...


2

I thin k, @PangHoMing was on the right track, but used Magical Records. Let's do it solely with CD: First rename the relationships. Probably in ChatMessage there should be a to-1 relationship named user (or chatUser) and in ChatUser there should be a to-N relationship messages (or chatMessages). They should be inverse relationship. Next you should ask for ...


2

As per the Apple's documentation, you can check the 'managedObjectContext' exists or not. if (YourNSManagedObject.managedObjectContext == nil) { NSLog(@"Hey I'm already freed, what are you doing with me. don't use me"); }


2

Do not forget to replace PRODUCT_MODULE_NAME with your product module name. When a new entity is created, you need to go to the Data Model Inspector (last tab) and replace PRODUCT_MODULE_NAME with your module name, or it will result a class not found error when creating the persistent store coordinator.


2

By the way be carful what you add as a prefix: My App is called "ABC-def" and Xcode has converted the "-" into a "_". To be safe look into the finder, find your project files and see what it says for your data model (for example "ABC_def.xcdatamodeld") and use what is written there EXACTLY!!!


2

You need to create a wrapper class that would be instantiated using core data entity and work with objects of that class in your code. For example, if you have such entity @interface Item: NSManagedObject NSInteger id; NSString *name; @end You should create a class @interface ItemObject: NSObject NSInteger itemId; NSString *itemName; @end ...



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