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19

It appears that menu items stay disabled if their target and action are not setup properly. In my case, I forgot the : at the end of my selector.


17

When you set the menu, you set the menu that appears for that item, not its parent menu. To add those three items to your menu, use: [fileMenu addItem: newMenu]; [fileMenu addItem: openMenu]; [fileMenu addItem: saveMenu]; And then to add the menu to the menu bar: NSMenuItem *fileMenuItem = [[NSMenuItem alloc] initWithTitle: @"File"]; [fileMenuItem ...


14

This actually works with no additional effort if your updating code runs in the run loop mode which is used during menu tracking. This is NSEventTrackingRunLoopMode, but you probably just want to use NSRunLoopCommonModes so the menu item title is correct when the menu is pulled down. Here's a simple example of a menu item foo that counts the number of ...


13

Solved it by using: [progressIndicator performSelector:@selector(startAnimation:) withObject:self afterDelay:0.0 inModes:[NSArray arrayWithObject:NSEventTrackingRunLoopMode]]; Inside the menuWillOpen:, the problem seems to have been calling ...


13

This is exactly what the First Responder object in IB is for. It is a proxy object for connecting actions. Any action messages sent to it will be passed down the responder chain to the first oobject that accepts them. For document based applications, the responder chain includes the current document. So, to connect the menu item to your document: Add the ...


13

Your post is tagged "Objective-C" and "Cocoa", although your sample code is C and Carbon. I assume you'd prefer a Cocoa solution? It's actually pretty simple in Cocoa. The only trick is learning how to draw outside the lines. :-) @interface FullMenuItemView : NSView @end @implementation FullMenuItemView - (void) drawRect:(NSRect)dirtyRect { NSRect ...


13

Had the same issue, so I thought I'd post my solution. NSMenu auto enables NSMenuButtons, so we have to override that. In IB: Or programmatically: // Disable auto enable [myMenu setAutoenablesItems:NO]; // Test it [myMenuButton setEnabled:NO]; [myMenuButton setEnabled:YES];


12

(If you want to change the layout of the menu, similar to how the Airport menu shows more info when you option click it, then keep reading. If you want to do something entirely different, then this answer may not be as relevant as you'd like.) The key is -[NSMenuItem setAlternate:]. For an example, let's say we're going to build an NSMenu that has a Do ...


12

Menu mouse tracking is done in a special run loop mode (NSEventTrackingRunLoopMode). In order to modify the menu, you need to dispatch a message so that it will be processed in the event tracking mode. The easiest way to do this is to use this method of NSRunLoop: [[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop] performSelector:@selector(updateTheMenu:) target:self ...


12

I'm not sure what piece of documentation you're referring to (a link would help). You can use the -setRepresentedObject: method of NSMenuItem to associate an arbitrary object with a menu item: //assume "item" is an NSMenuItem object: NSString* someObj = @"Some Arbitrary Object"; [item setRepresentedObject:someObj]; [item ...


11

The problem here is that you need your callback to get triggered even in menu tracking mode. For example, -[NSTask waitUntilExit] "polls the current run loop using NSDefaultRunLoopMode until the task completes". This means that it won't get run until after the menu closes. At that point, scheduling updateTheMenu to run on NSCommonRunLoopMode doesn't help—it ...


10

When you create an NSMenuItem your item will have to have a valid target and a valid selector. This means the target cannot be nil, and has to respond to the passed selector. Keep in mind that in this case a NULL selector will not enable the menu item. NSMenu *myMenu; NSMenuItem *myItem; myMenu = [[NSMenu alloc] initWithTitle:@""]; myItem = [[NSMenuItem ...


9

If you have defined your NSMenuItem in your header and connected it through your NIB, you can simply call the Hidden property. [myMenuItem setHidden:YES]; "Greying out" the menuItem would be [myMenuItem setEnabled: NO];


9

I finally found an answer, in order for them to not be handled by the Windows menu you need to call [timelineViewWindow setExcludedFromWindowsMenu:YES]; [mentionsViewWindow setExcludedFromWindowsMenu:YES]; and after that add the Menu items to the Windows menu and they will not disappear anymore.


9

This is how I add a submenu to an NSMenu item: NSMenuItem *mainItem = [[NSMenuItem alloc] init]; [mainItem setTitle:@"Main item"]; NSMenu *submenu = [[NSMenu alloc] init]; [submenu addItemWithTitle:@"Sub item" action:nil keyEquivalent:@""]; [mainItem setSubmenu:submenu];


9

You will need to do custom drawing to achieve this effect, which is not standard in NSWindow. Take a look at this example code: (MAAttatchedWindow) http://mattgemmell.com/source.


8

Add this method to your custom NSView and it will work fine with mouse events - (void)mouseUp:(NSEvent*) event { NSMenuItem* mitem = [self enclosingMenuItem]; NSMenu* m = [mitem menu]; [m cancelTracking]; [m performActionForItemAtIndex: [m indexOfItem: mitem]]; } But i'm having problems with keyhandling, if you solved this problem maybe ...


8

If you want the action to be triggered against your object, you have to specify a target for the new NSMenuItem: NSMenuItem *item = [statusMenu insertItemWithTitle:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d - %@", convo.newMessagesCount, convo.ewName] action:@selector(openEchowavesURL:) keyEquivalent:@"" atIndex:0]; [item setTarget:self]; // or whatever target you ...


8

Please refer to the description of setKeyEquivalent: method in the NSMenuItem Class Reference: If you want to specify the Backspace key as the key equivalent for a menu item, use a single character string with NSBackspaceCharacter (defined in NSText.h as 0x08) and for the Forward Delete key, use NSDeleteCharacter (defined in NSText.h as 0x7F). Note that ...


7

I solved it with the help of a colleague, so I post it here for others that experience the same issue. You should set your NSMenu-sublass to auto-enable items (default behaviour) and then implement this method in the NSMenu-sublass. - (BOOL)validateMenuItem:(NSMenuItem *)menuItem { return [menuItem isEnabled]; }


7

When you click a menu item with a bound state (or value) property, the menu item both triggers its action and flips the bound value. And the order of these two operations does not seem to be guaranteed, see the following thread on Cocoa Builder: Thanks, I am not absolutely sure because I did several changes in my project but I think that this can be ...


7

As you said, in Yosemite, docks, status bars etc. are affected by whatever is behind them. Try enabling System Preferences > Accessibility > Display > Reduce Transparency and you'll see what your color looks like without this feature./


6

You are setting the target but have a nil action. Try not setting the target. This may leave it enabled all the time in which case you may have to manually enable or disable the menu item. Here is the documentation on how menu items get enabled.


6

You can embed any NSView into a menu. See the -setView: method of NSMenuItem.


6

Add this to your custom view and you should be fine: - (BOOL)acceptsFirstMouse:(NSEvent *)theEvent { return YES; }


6

The NSMenuItemCell and NSMenuView have never been used to draw menus in any release version of Mac OS X. The following is an excerpt from the Mac OS X Developer Release Notes: Notes specific to MacOS X Developer Preview 3 Menu The implementation of menus has changed drastically; NSMenuView and NSMenuItemCell are no longer used, -[NSMenu ...


5

Here's a rather less long-winded version of the above. It's worked well for me. (backgroundColour is an ivar.) -(void)drawRect:(NSRect)rect { if ([[self enclosingMenuItem] isHighlighted]) { [[NSColor selectedMenuItemColor] set]; } else if (backgroundColour) { [backgroundColour set]; } NSRectFill(rect); }


5

In most cases, you'll create a custom view containing the slider or whatever else you want to appear in the menu item. Then you call setView: on the NSMenuItem in question. For more details, check this article from Apple's documentation: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/MenuList/Articles/ViewsInMenuItems.html


5

When you do: GravatarMenuItem *menuItem = [[GravatarMenuItem alloc] initWithNibName:@"GravatarMenuItem" bundle:nil]; It only creates the view controller. It doesn't actually load the view from the nib. When you access the properties, they are most likely nil as the view has not been loaded (and the connections have not been made). If you update your code ...


5

It should work if you just create an empty Cocoa project in Xcode and follow these steps: First, in the interface section of your AppDelegate.h, enter this line: -(IBAction)openLink:(id)sender; Second, in the implementation section of your AppDelegate.m, enter these lines: -(IBAction)openLink:(id)sender { [[NSWorkspace ...



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