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23

Using NSMutableSet NSMutableSet *set1 = [NSMutableSet setWithArray: array1]; NSSet *set2 = [NSSet setWithArray: array2]; [set1 intersectSet: set2]; NSArray *resultArray = [set1 allObjects];


20

You can achieve that by understanding how the comparison is made by the NSSet. When you add a new object to the set, isEqual: method is called (it's an NSObject method) against each of the set's elements. So what you can do is override this method and provide a custom comparison like this: NOTE: If you override isEqual: method you must override hash ...


14

Sure, you can use that method: NSSortDescriptor *sort = [NSSortDescriptor sortDescriptorWithKey:@"description" ascending:YES]; NSArray *sortedArray = [mySet sortedArrayUsingDescriptors:[NSArray arrayWithObject:sort]]; This just creates a new sort descriptor that specifies the key "description" (NSString provides a -description method that returns the ...


12

You need to override hash in addition to isEqual. In fact, you always need to make sure these two methods work together. From Apple's documentation: If two objects are equal (as determined by the isEqual: method), they must have the same hash value. This last point is particularly important if you define hash in a subclass and intend to put instances of ...


11

Use an instance of NSPredicate to filter on the property you're interested in. For example: NSSet *dogs = [NSSet setWithObjects: [Dog dogWithName:@"Fido" age:2], [Dog dogWithName:@"Fluffy" age: 3], [Dog dogWithName:@"Spot" age:2], nil]; NSPredicate *predicate = [NSPredicate ...


7

Just imagine that CFSetCreateMutable() is equivalent to [[NSMutableSet alloc] init] in that you have to release the object after you are done with it. If you are using ARC, you can cast a CFMutableSet to an NSMutableSet using a bridged cast: (__bridge_transfer NSMutableSet *)theCFSet. This will tell ARC that it is responsible for releasing the set after it ...


7

At some point before you use the set, you need to create a new NSMutableSet. To make it easy, you can use something like the following to automatically allocate a new mutable set when you ask to use it for the first time. - (NSMutableSet *)NHPList { if (NHPList == nil) { NHPList = [[NSMutableSet alloc] init]; } return NHPList; } You ...


6

try [localSet unionSet:serverSet] EDIT Here's code that just uses symbols instead of NSDictionarys: NSArray *symbols = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"AAPL",@"GOOG",@"INTC",@"YHOO",nil]; NSArray *fetchedSymbols = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"AMD",@"BIDU",@"GOOG",@"GMCR",@"INTC",@"YHOO",nil]; NSMutableSet* localSet = [[NSMutableSet alloc] ...


4

That's a pretty dense way of saying "don't add an observer to the set itself, add an observer to the class that contains the set": [myObjWithASetAsIvar addObserver:self forKeyPath:@"nameOfIvarHoldingTheSet" options:NSKeyValueObservingOptionNew context:nil]; The one tricky bit is that ...


4

The way you are looking is the right way, you are forgetting a small detail: how could the NSMutableOrderedSet class know about which instances of SomeObject contain same values? The answer is simple: you must provide your own implementations of - (BOOL)isEqual:(id)anObject - (NSUInteger)hash So that your instances will return true when compared with ...


4

I tried this and it worked so I'm guessing there is other code that is missing or the NSNumbers really aren't the same, just the printed representation is the same. NSMutableSet *fetchedThreadIds = [NSMutableSet setWithObjects:@1, @2, @3, @4, nil]; NSSet *savedThreads = [NSSet setWithObjects:@2, @3, nil]; NSLog(@"fetchedThreadIds: %@", fetchedThreadIds); ...


4

NSMutableSet only accepts reference types, but CGPoint is a struct, a value type. You can wrap the point in an NSValue to add it. mutableSet.addObject(NSValue(CGPoint: touch.locationInNode(self)))


4

The real capacity is only limited by the available memory. The initial capacity just allows you to avoid growing the set dynamically when you know the actual or approximate size of the set. This is more efficient than continually growing the set. For example, if you wanted a set to store the letters in a string (i.e. attack = {atck}), you know there are ...


4

To use objects as elements of NSSet, keys of NSDictionary etc. they need to implement the hash method and the isEqual: method. If you don't have your own implementation, hash returns the object pointer and isEqual compares object pointers and everything will work just fine. If you implemented hash and isEqual: yourself, you must make sure of two things: 1. ...


3

If you create identical objects, only one copy will be put into the set. This is by design. If you want multiple copies, use an array instead. This is probably happening more than you would expect though, because you are using random and not seeding it properly. Use arc4random() % 100 (or a number even bigger than 100) if you want it to happen less ...


3

I think what you want is an NSMutableDictionary, mapping the personId to the Person object. NSMutableDictionary *dict = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init]; Person *person = something; [dict setObject:personObj forKey:[NSNumber numberWithInt:[person personId]]]; ... etc ... (don't forget to release dict later somewhere). In order to find the Person class ...


3

As everybody else has said, NSSet is unsorted by definition. Howeever, if you have to use NSMutableSet you can get a sorted array from the elements using something like (assuming, in this case the elements are strings) NSArray* unsorted = [mySet allObjects]; NSArray* sorted = [unsorted sortedArrayUsingComparator: ^(NSString* string1, NSString* string2) ...


3

You seem to be over-releasing dictEntry with [dictEntry release];. When using dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys, you're getting an autoreleased object back. So releasing it again will decrease the retain count. EDIT: If you're unsure how it works and when you're actually retaining objects, you might want to have a look at the memory management docs: You ...


3

Because it's not ordered. Use NSMutableOrderedSet if you need that.


3

NSMutableSet is not thread-safe. If you wish to access one from multiple threads, you must enforce one-at-a-time access yourself. This is documented in “Thread Safety Summary” in the Threading Programming Guide. The typical way to enforce one-at-a-time access is by creating one GCD queue (for each set) and accessing the set only from that queue (using ...


2

Have you tried wrapping it and any other code that uses theSet in a synchronized(theSet) block, a threading issue could explain your issue. Maybe the null is caused by some intermediate state.


2

If there's any characteristic of the NSSet is that they dont have any order! You should use a NSMutableArray for your purpose. Read about collections here, it will help you https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/Collections/Collections.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/10000034-BBCFIHFH


2

An 'NSSet' is unordered. It is meant to contain only unique items (no duplicate items). From Apples docs of NSSet: ...declare the programmatic interface to an unordered collection of objects. If you want order, go for NSMutableArray or NSMutableOrderedSet.


2

This is not really an answer, but it will help us to find the problem. Some questions: Are you sure that 0x80d5680 is the instance that was previously removed? How do you remove it from the set? Do you modify the state of your objects after adding them? Are you sure that your hashes are unique (sum of int value of ivars sound sounds suspicious). Finally, ...


2

try this NSMutableSet *set = [[NSMutableSet alloc] init]; [set addObject:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"1"]]; [set addObject:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"2"]]; [set addObject:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"3"]]; [set addObject:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"4"]]; NSLog(@"%@",set); // Output (3,1,4,2,5) ... all objects NSSortDescriptor *sort = [NSSortDescriptor ...


2

This is what -intersectsSet: is for. if ([a intersectsSet:b]) // do something


2

If you want to check if the corresponding name attributes are identical, the following should work: [[group valueForKeyPath:@"users.name"] isEqualToSet:[members valueForKey:@"name"]] [group valueForKeyPath:@"users.name"] returns the set of the names of all users in the group, and [members valueForKey:@"name"] returns the set of the names of all users in ...


2

Because an NSMutableSet has no order. An array is ordered; a set is not. (An ordered set sort of bridges the gap, but that's not what you're using.) Read the fine documentation: https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/Cocoa/Reference/Foundation/Classes/NSSet_Class/Reference/Reference.html What's the first sentence? The NSSet, ...


2

Your removeAllTasks method does not delete any objects. It only removes the relationships from the Occurrence object to the Task objects, but the tasks continue to exist. The deletion rules are only applied if an object is deleted (using deleteObject:).



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