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35

Calling -dealloc doesn't automatically happen after the view controller is dismissed — there can still be some "life" left in the view controller's lifetime. In that timeframe, that view controller is still subscribed for that notification. If you remove the observer in -viewWillDisappear: or -viewDidDisappear:, this will have a more immediate effect: - ...


34

As for using constant strings in your project, there’s another question on Stack Overflow about that: Constants in Objective C. As for naming notifications, Coding Guidelines for Cocoa suggests the following: Notifications are identified by global NSString objects whose names are composed in this way: [Name of associated class] + [Did | Will] + ...


28

Apple has provided an Observer Pattern in the Cocoa library called the NSNotificationCenter. The basic idea is that a listener registers with a broadcaster using some predefined protocol. At some later point, the broadcaster is told to notify all of its listeners, where it calls some function on each of its listeners and passes certain arguments along. ...


26

"Does the NSNotification retain the object ? (in a similar fashion to NSMutableDictionary or Array) ... meaning I can release the object after posting the notification" I'm not sure if the object and userInfo parameters are retained by that method or not, but in practice, it shouldn't really matter. I think you may be envisioning that ...


16

Had this problem as well To fix in moviePlayBackDidFinish just add player.fullscreen = NO; before removing view from superview


9

The first problem may be your selector — that should be @selector(action:). Also, are you sure you want to register the notification in init (which is missing any call to [super init], which may be another problem)? That means your notification will be (re)registered every time you create an instance of the class. You might consider implementing a ...


9

Ideally an object would start observing interesting events as soon as its initialized. So it will register all interesting events with the NotificationCenter inside its initialization code. sendEvent: is basically a wrapper around the postNotification: method. @implementation A - (id)init { if(self = [super init]) { [[NSNotificationCenter ...


9

The two are not always interchangeable. Conceptually, KVO is only for observing a property of an object. For example, you can't use KVO to replace NSApplicationWillTerminateNotification because it notifies observers about an event happening, not a change in a property of an object. As for performance and memory usage, they are both fast and use negligible ...


9

make a super viewController called rootViewController to subClass the UIViewController and in the init to init the Notification and in the dealloc to remove the Notification And then all your viewController should subClass the rootViewController . It just OOP like : @interface RootViewController : UIViewController @end @implementation RootViewController ...


8

Don't forget to remove the observer when you unload a view. Basically what's happening is when you post a notification to a non-existing view it can't run the selector, thus crashing your app. -(void)dealloc { [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] removeObserver:self]; [super dealloc]; }


8

Yes you should. viewDidUnload is not called when the view controller is deallocated. Because viewDidLoad is called when the view controller is opened, people sometimes mistakenly assume that its opposite (viewDidUnload) is called when the screen closes. That is not the case, viewDidUnload is only used in low-memory situations. That’s why we need to ...


8

The notification's object property stores the text field whose text changed, so notif.object.text would contain the text "r".


8

By using - addObserver:selector:name:object: and passing nil for both the name and the object, you will get notified about any notification. - (id)init { self = [super init]; if (self != nil) { [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(log:) name:nil object:nil]; } return self; } - ...


7

The most likely cause is that you're not actually calling addObserver:selector:name:object:. You don't have a logging line there; are you sure that code is running? The second most likely cause is that you're calling removeObserver: before the notification is posted. This is most commonly in dealloc (which should always call removeObserver if you've ever ...


6

The difference is, that NSEvent is used to encapsulate input events. Mouse down, key down etc. However, NSNotification is used to notify observers about a change of a state or an object (eg. when the network reachability changed, new data became available or that a window moved). In your case: A window move isn't some kind of input, but a change of the ...


6

One of things you need to remember about NSNotifications are that they are a blocking mechanism. So while the object posting the notification need not know who is receiving it, if there are too many receivers, it will have to process all of them before the postNotification call can return. That is something that you will have to take into consideration. As ...


6

Your friend is 100% correct. Though, it does not matter if you remove all notification observations in dealloc. You mentioned viewDidUnload, and there the case is completely different, because the unloaded object will stay alive, and you don't know when the notification observations of the superclass are added again. If they are added in viewDidLoad you ...


5

Using NSNotification you can notify multiple objects about some event and you can do that not caring about which objects and how many of them are listening for that notification. NSNotification passes through NSNotificationCenter object that is responsible for getting notifications from objects who create them (using postNotification: functions family) and ...


5

Local notification will rely on the user's clock to be set accurately. You could compare the user's clock with a server time before delivering any rewards. If the user's clock is off by more than a few minutes, you could alert the user and not allow the reward until it is fixed.


5

Subclassing NSNotification is an atypical operation. I think I've only seen it done once or twice in the past few years. If you're looking to pass things along with the notification, that's what the userInfo property is for. If you don't like accessing things through the userInfo directly, you could use a category to simplify access: @interface ...


5

You can set a symbolic breakpoint in -[NSNotificationCenter postNotificationName:object:userInfo:] and print the third argument passed to it (the first being the NSNotificationCenter, the second, _cmd) using the debugger po command.


5

I dont know, how can you remove observers registered on the same objects. But i think below method will help you to move little ahead to find your solution. observationInfo Returns a pointer that identifies information about all of the observers that are registered with the receiver. - (void *)observationInfo The default implementation of this method ...


5

Your #2 is the standard Cocoa pattern for delegates. Each message of the delegate protocol takes the object as the first argument. For example, in UITableViewDelegate, you find methods like this: - (CGFloat)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView heightForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath; When a table view sends this message to its delegate, it sends ...


5

Yes it is possible, NSNotification center works exactly in that way. register the listener on first view controller. -(void) viewDidLoad { [super viewDidLoad]; [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(somethingHappens:) name:@"notificationName" object:nil]; } -(void) somethingHappens:(NSNotification*) notification { } ...


4

You must first register a notification name [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(startLocating:) name:@"ForceUpdateLocation" object:nil]; // don't forget the ":" And then post a notification with a dictionary of parameters [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] postNotificationName:@"ForceUpdateLocation" object:self ...


4

Ok I'm adding a little bit more information to vince's answer In class A : post the notification [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] postNotficationName:@"DataUpdated" object:arrayOfPurchasedObjects]; In class B : register first for the notification, and write a method to handle it. You give the ...


4

It's not just the notification center. I have a class containing a method with a loop. I need to be able to break the loop if a certain event (e.g. button press) occurs. The events for that button press come in on the main thread. If your loop is running on the main thread, then the button press itself does not get processed until your loop is ...


4

Add yourself as an observer for the array controller's arrangedObjects. When an object is added or removed in its content array, it will add or remove it at the appropriate position in that array, and it will notify any observers with the change. The dictionary describing the change will contain keys that describe exactly what happened to the array, so you ...


4

Change the format specifier in your NSLog from %@ to %f. You are trying to access float value as object!



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