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37

To convert an NSNumber to NSDecimalNumber, wouldn't it make more sense to avoid the character representation altogether with this code? NSNumber* source = ...; NSDecimalNumber* result = [NSDecimalNumber decimalNumberWithDecimal:[source decimalValue]];


28

You should definitely use NSNumberFormatter for this. The basic steps are: Allocate, initialize and configure your number formatter. Use the formatter to return a formatted string from a number. (It takes an NSNumber, so you'll need to convert your double or whatever primitive you have to NSNumber.) Clean up. (You know, memory management.) This code sets ...


24

You can also use setMaximumFractionDigits to truncate the fraction: unsigned long int intToBeDisplayed = 1234567890; NSNumber *longNumber = [NSNumber numberWithUnsignedLong:intToBeDisplayed]; NSNumberFormatter *formatter = [[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init]; [formatter setUsesGroupingSeparator:YES]; [formatter setGroupingSeparator:@","]; [formatter ...


17

Its presuming that the number is in the range of 0-1, as it is a percent so 0.905 would get you 90.5%.


16

NSNumberFormatter *formatter = [[[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init] autorelease]; NSString *decimalSymbol = [formatter decimalSeparator];


15

Try adding the following line, when configuring your formatter: [doubleValueWithMaxTwoDecimalPlaces setMaximumFractionDigits:2];


15

Yes, after you set the style, you can tweak specific aspects: NSNumberFormatter *nf = [[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init]; [nf setNumberStyle:NSNumberFormatterCurrencyStyle]; [nf setCurrencySymbol:@""]; // <-- this NSDecimalNumber* number = [NSDecimalNumber decimalNumberWithString:[textField text]]; NSString *price = [nf stringFromNumber:number]; Just as ...


14

Here is an example using a standard formatting style of NSNumberFormatter: NSNumber *firstNumber = [NSNumber numberWithInt:123456789]; NSNumberFormatter *formatter = [[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init]; [formatter setNumberStyle:NSNumberFormatterDecimalStyle]; NSString *convertNumber = [formatter stringForObjectValue:firstNumber]; NSLog(@"value : %@", ...


14

After the UITextField.text property is changed, any previous references to UITextPosition or UITextRange objects that were associated with the old text will be set to nil after you set the text property. You need to store what the text offset will be after the manipulation will be BEFORE you set the text property. This worked for me (note, you do have to ...


13

This is a difficult one. Doing the following works without issues: double moneyAmount = 1256.34; NSLocale *french = [[NSLocale alloc] initWithLocaleIdentifier:@"fr_FR"]; NSNumberFormatter *currencyStyle = [[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init]; [currencyStyle setLocale:french]; [currencyStyle setNumberStyle:NSNumberFormatterCurrencyStyle]; NSNumber *amount = ...


12

After you set the currency style, try [currencyFormatter setMaximumFractionDigits:0]; You may need to set the rounding mode as well.


11

I think you want to call setMaximumFractionDigits with zero. NSNumberFormatter *fmtCurrency = [[[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init] autorelease]; [fmtCurrency setNumberStyle: NSNumberFormatterCurrencyStyle]; [fmtCurrency setGeneratesDecimalNumbers:FALSE]; [fmtCurrency setCurrencyCode:@"GBP"]; [fmtCurrency setCurrencySymbol:@"£"]; NSNumber* myNumber = [NSNumber ...


10

From the very page you linked: For more details, see the IEEE printf specification. Now from the IEEE printf specification: + The result of a signed conversion shall always begin with a sign ( '+' or '-' ). The conversion shall begin with a sign only when a negative value is converted if this flag is not specified. Example: NSLog(@"%+f", ...


9

This does the trick in one method (for English). Thanks nickf http://stackoverflow.com/a/69284/1208690 for original code in PHP, I just adapted it to objective C: -(NSString *) addSuffixToNumber:(int) number { NSString *suffix; int ones = number % 10; int temp = floor(number/10.0); int tens = temp%10; if (tens ==1) { suffix = ...


9

You're looking for a combination of "maximum significant digits" and "maximum fraction digits", along with particular rounding behavior. NSNumberFormatter is equal to the task: float twofortythreetwentyfive = 234.25; float onetwothreefourtwentyfive = 1234.25; float eleventwothreefourtwentyfive = 11234.25; NSNumberFormatter * formatter = ...


9

If you just want an NSString, you can simply do this: NSString *myNumber = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%02d", number]; The %02d is from C. %nd means there must be at least n characters in the string and if there are less, pad it with 0's. Here's an example: NSString *example = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%010d", number]; If the number variable only ...


8

You likely don't want to create an instance variable in the header. You can simplify your implementation and provide an (id)value all in one line. [editedObject setValue:[NSNumber numberWithInteger:[[numberField text] integerValue]] forKey:editedFieldKey];


8

Yes, it's documented as a note in the NSNumberFormatter Class Reference (requires login). The note says: iPhone OS Note: iPhone OS supports only the modern 10.4+ behavior. 10.0-style methods and format strings are not available on iPhone OS. EDIT: Added more text to support follow-up questions. You could re-write yours to something similar: ...


8

On OS X, the two operation modes owe their history to the introduction in 10.4 of more useful behaviour based on standard open source libraries. For the purposes of binary compatibility, if you don't otherwise do anything then NSNumberFormatters are created with pre-10.4 behaviour. iOS postdates the launch of OS X 10.4, so only the 10.4 behaviour is ...


8

Use %02d format specifier, e.g. NSLog(@"%02d", number); That will output integer number with at least 2 characters length and output will be padded with leading zeroes if required


8

I'm not sure exactly why it doesn't work when using numberFromString, but I tested this myself, and it does work if you use "stringForObjectValue" instead. (replace all "stringFromNumber" with "stringForObjectValue") Edit: Found the answer On this blog: http://www.nsformatter.com/blog/2010/6/9/nsnumberformatter.html it says: (NSString ...


8

I would recommend not hardcoding the separator to ensure the right separator behavior based on the iPhone locale setting. The easiest way to to this is: NSNumberFormatter *numberFormatter = [[NSNumberFormatter alloc]init]; numberFormatter.locale = [NSLocale currentLocale];// this ensures the right separator behavior numberFormatter.numberStyle = ...


7

I've been working on this issue and I think I figured out a nice, clean solution. I'll show you how to appropriately update the textfield on user input, but you'll have to figure out the localization yourself, that part should be easy enough anyway. - (void)viewDidLoad { [super viewDidLoad]; // setup text field ... #define PADDING 10.0f ...


7

if (([payment doubleValue] - floor([payment doubleValue]) < 0.01) { [formatter setMaximumFractionDigits: 0]; } This should work.


6

I had the same question! Here's how you do it. You want to use NSNumberFormatter and set it to use Decimal style: NSNumberFormatter *formatter = [[[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init] autorelease]; [formatter setNumberStyle: NSNumberFormatterDecimalStyle]; textField.text = [formatter stringFromNumber: [formatter numberFromString:textField.text]]; Replace ...


6

The reason it doesn't work is most likely that in your locale (Italian), the period "." is not the valid decimal separator. Call -[NSNumberFormatter setDecimalSeparator:] to set it to the correct value.


6

I would suggest a combination of manual and using NSNumberFormatter. My idea is to subclass NSNumberFormatter. If the number you are formatting is > 1,000,000, you can divide it, use the super implementation to format the result, and append " mln" to the end. Only do the part which you can't have done for you.


6

You can use NSNumberFormatter class. Convert integer to NSNumber and use NSNumberFormatter. NSNumber *number = [NSNumber numberWithInt:1256256]; NSNumberFormatter *formatter = [[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init]; [formatter setGroupingSize:3]; [formatter setGroupingSeparator:@","]; [formatter setUsesGroupingSeparator:YES]; NSString *finalString = ...


6

Keep in mind that you should really be localizing this if you are interacting with users on this, however here is one way to do it: - (NSString *)formatString:(NSString *)string { // Strip out the commas that may already be here: NSString *newString = [string stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString:@"," withString:@""]; if ([newString length] == 0) ...


6

Use [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%+d", intSomeNumber]



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