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11

If you are deriving from NSOperation and implementing the main method, you do not need to set up an autorelease pool. The default implementation of the start method pushes an NSAutoReleasePool, calls main and then subsequently pops the NSAutoReleasePool. The same goes for NSInvocationOperation and NSBlockOperation, which share the same implementation of the ...


9

Your intuition here is correct. If issuing many requests, having an NSOperationQueue with maxConcurrentOperationCount of 4 or 5 can be very useful. In the absence of that, if you issue many requests (say, 50 large images), you can suffer timeout problems when working on a slow network connection (e.g. some cellular connections). Operation queues have other ...


5

GCD is a lightweight way to represent units of work that are going to be executed concurrently. You don’t schedule these units of work; the system takes care of scheduling for you. Adding dependency among blocks can be a headache. Canceling or suspending a block creates extra work for you as a developer! NSOperation and NSOperationQueue add a ...


5

From the swift book: You can present an inherited read-only property as a read-write property by providing both a getter and a setter in your subclass property override. I think you'll find that this works: override var executing : Bool { get { return _executing } set { willChangeValueForKey("isExecuting") _executing = ...


4

The question appears to be whether you can create a cancelable NSBlockOperation. As this answer suggests, quoting from WWDC 2012 session #211, Building Concurrent User Interfaces, you certainly can. This approach consists of limitations, though. Notably, you have to put the cancellation logic in your block. This works fine if your block is running some loop ...


4

Cancelling an operation doesn't actually stop any executing operation. It just stops new ones from being started. You have to stop any current operations manually in the operation itself. For instance, if you have code that collects downloaded data then before you concatenate the data check if the operation is cancelled. If the operation is cancelled ...


4

Conceptually, NSURLSession is an operation queue. If you resume an NSURLSession task and breakpoint on the completion handler, the stack trace can be quite revealing. Here's an excerpt from the ever faithful Ray Wenderlich's tutorial on NSURLSession with an added NSLog statement to breakpoint on executing the completion handler: NSURLSession *session = ...


4

You are assigning a new NSBlockOperation to a weak variable. Whenever you assign a new object to a weak variable, you risk having it released immediately. If you needed a weak reference to the operation, you'd assign the object to some local variable first, and then get the weak reference for that object: NSBlockOperation* operation = [NSBlockOperation ...


4

Heads up! This is a long answer. TL;DR: You can't re-run an NSOperation, but you can design your classes and methods to make it easy to retry requests. First a quick answer to your title question: you can't re-run an NSOperation, they're not designed to do that. From the docs: An operation object is a single-shot object — that is, it executes its ...


4

As David said, you can implement both a getter and setter in the subclass property override. But, when defining asynchronous/concurrent operations (i.e. those operations that will complete asynchronously), it is critical to call the will/didChangeValueForKey for isFinished and isExecuting. If you don't, operations won't be released, dependencies won't be ...


4

NSBlockOperation can't handle asynchronous operations, but it's not all that hard to create a subclass of NSOperation that can... Basically, you need to create an NSOperation that takes a block that takes another block as a completion handler. The block could be defined like this: typedef void(^AsyncBlock)(dispatch_block_t completionHandler); Then, in ...


4

Workaround: You can create NSOperation subclass (no generic), override main and call you own 'execute' func, which can be overriden by generic subclasses. Example: class SwiftOperation : NSOperation { final override func main() { execute() } func execute() { } } class MyOperation<T> : SwiftOperation { override func ...


3

According to NSOperationQueue Class Reference : Queued operations are cancelled before they begin executing. If an operation is already executing, it is up to that operation to recognize the cancellation and stop what it is doing. And NSOperation Class Reference : Canceling an operation does not immediately force it to stop what it is doing. ...


3

Put these lines [self.tablaCinturones reloadData]; self.tablaCinturones.hidden = NO; into a dispatch block that moves them to the main thread dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{ [self.tablaCinturones reloadData]; self.tablaCinturones.hidden = NO; }); The problem is that NSOperation moves your method calls to a different thread, and the ...


3

Its an interesting question and the answer is all about the semantics of how NSOperation and NSURLConnection interact and work together. An NSURLConnection is itself an asynchronous task. It all happens in the background and calls its delegate periodically with the results. When you start an NSURLConnection it schedules the delegate callbacks using the ...


3

If I understood you correctly concurrent NSOperation is what you need. Concurrent NSOperation are suitable for long running background/async tasks. NSOperation Documentation See: Subclassing Notes & Operation Dependencies Section EDIT:(Adding more explanation) Basically concurrent operations do not finish when main method finishes. Actually what ...


2

From my experience working with web services and also AFHTTPRequest, the request timed out is mostly server/network related. If you are confirmed that the server does not have any problem, I think the best you can do is giving the request to a timeoutInterval (eg: 15 seconds). Next, if you still receive the request timed out error, you can make a try the ...


2

That's what NSRunLoops are made for. As per apple's docs A run loop is an event processing loop that you use to schedule work and coordinate the receipt of incoming events. The purpose of a run loop is to keep your thread busy when there is work to do and put your thread to sleep when there is none. But... I see from your code that you are using ...


2

Upon startup, you should set isExecuting to YES but you should not set isFinished at all, especially not to YES. When your async operation is done, you need to set isExecuting to NO, not YES, and you need to set isFinished to YES but you are setting isExecuting a 2nd time.


2

You could try the dispatch_group_t. You can think them as retain counter for GCD. Imagine the code below in the main method of your NSOperationsubclass : - (void) main { self.executing = YES; self.finished = NO; // Create a group -> value = 0 dispatch_group_t group = dispatch_group_create(); NSURLSession * session = [NSURLSession ...


2

You can subclass an NSOperationQueue and override the - addOperation: method like this. - (void)addOperation:(NSOperation *)operation { // check whether the queue has at least one operation, you can also check for nil if ([[self operations] count] > 0) [operation addDependency:[self.operations lastObject]]; [super addOperation:operation]; } ...


2

Your problem sounds that you need to regulate the order of the operation where you have to use the, - (void)addDependency:(NSOperation *)operation method of NSOperation to say hey you have to operate after one specific operation. Lets take an example: NSOperation *firstOperation = [NSOperation new]; // do your own init NSOperation *secoundOperation = ...


2

I remember when NSOperation was first introduced, and I had to write a introductory article for the ADC site that would first download some photos, and then render them into a poster. I ran into similar issues there: using dependencies to control order, but then finding I had to pass the image filenames to the dependent operation. That was many years ago, ...


2

I am guessing performRequestWithHandler: returns immediately, since it takes a callback block as its argument. As soon as the block for an NSBlockOperation returns, the operation is considered finished, so all your operations finish immediately and only later are their completion blocks called. You might need to subclass NSOperation and implement the ...


2

You can use a shared instance class, this is what I always do: Database.h #import <Foundation/Foundation.h> @interface Database : NSObject @property (nonatomic, readonly) NSArray* myTable; +(Database*) sharedInstance; @end Database.m #import "Database.h" @implementation Database Database* _db = nil; +(Database*) sharedInstance { if ...


2

You can't use addExecutionBlock: to add an execution block while the operation is running or has already completed. That's all it means.


2

You have an async operation inside an operation. The operation queue is doing exactly what it is supposed to do and is ejecting the finished DownloadOperation once the method download completes. It doesn't care that the operation has callbacks. You need to retain ownership of the DownloadOperation operation by adding it to strongly referenced collection ...


2

First, an operation is removed from the Queue only when its isFinished property becomes true. Secondly, if you dealloc B, then the Queue will be dealloced and the operations as well. But you should make sure in your code that you are not referencing these operation objects or the Queue at a later point of time.


2

The fundamental issue is that you've declared webServiceOperation to be dependent upon dbInsertOperation (i.e. it won't start webServiceOperation until dbInsertOperation finishes), but you never start dbInsertOperation, so webServiceOperation will never run. If you want to make dbInsertOperation dependent upon webServiceOperation, you don't want: ...


2

The problem is caused by this simple rule: Method in a generic class cannot be represented in Objective-C As a result, when bridged to Objective-C, MyOperation looks like pure, with no methods are overridden, NSOperation subclass. You can see this error by marking override func main() with @objc attribute. @objc override func main() { // < [!] ...



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