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22

You need to research Cocoa's Target/Action mechanism. This is a basic Cocoa concept you'll need to understand. The slider (and any other control) can be given a target (some controller object) and an action (the method to call against that controller object). The action is fired when the user stops dragging by default. Check the slider's Continuous ...


14

This works for me (and is easier than subclassing NSSlider): - (IBAction)sizeSliderValueChanged:(id)sender { NSEvent *event = [[NSApplication sharedApplication] currentEvent]; BOOL startingDrag = event.type == NSLeftMouseDown; BOOL endingDrag = event.type == NSLeftMouseUp; BOOL dragging = event.type == NSLeftMouseDragged; ...


13

Ok, so it's figured out. apparently the slider was trying to be smart and draw only where the knob has been. so apparently I have to invalidate the rect all the time by overriding setNeedsDisplayInRect in the slider class. #import "customSlider.h" @implementation customSlider -(void)setNeedsDisplayInRect:(NSRect)invalidRect{ [super ...


12

Quickly written example based on an array with the desired values: SampleAppDelegate.h #import <Cocoa/Cocoa.h> @interface SampleAppDelegate : NSObject <NSApplicationDelegate> { NSWindow * window; NSArray * values; IBOutlet NSSlider * theSlider; IBOutlet NSTextField * theLabel; } - (IBAction)sliderChanged:(id)sender; ...


10

When the Undo system performs an undo action, it expects you to register the redo actions using the same code as for undo, (except that the NSUndoManager knows it's rewinding - but you should not care). So add the proper NSUndoManager calls in -setSliderValue:


9

You can use the methods of NSControl. Example: [self.slider setDoubleValue:0.1];


6

This works for me (and is easier than subclassing NSSlider): - (IBAction)sizeSliderValueChanged:(id)sender { NSEvent *event = [[NSApplication sharedApplication] currentEvent]; BOOL startingDrag = event.type == NSLeftMouseDown; BOOL endingDrag = event.type == NSLeftMouseUp; BOOL dragging = event.type == NSLeftMouseDragged; ...


6

You'd use the following code: [slider setTarget:self]; [slider setAction:@selector(valueChanged:)]; That's it. NSSlider uses an NSSliderCell, which is a custom subclass of NSActionCell; I'd look over that documentation for the target action mechanism in Cocoa.


6

This is correct, you have to subclass the NSSlider class to redraw the bar or the knob. NSRect is just a rectangular container, you have to draw inside this container. I made an example based on an custom NSLevelIndicator that I have in one of my program. First you need to calculate the position of the knob. You must pay attention to the control minimum ...


5

If you want to keep the tickmark stopping behaviour but hide them, you can override the NSSliderCell's -(NSRect)rectOfTickMarkAtIndex:(NSInteger)index and provide a rectangle with 0 dimensions.


5

Whenever you notice that a superclass's implementation of mouseDragged: or mouseUp: is not getting called, it's most likely because the class's implementation of mouseDown: enters a tracking loop. This is certainly true of many NSControl subclasses including NSSlider. A better way to detect a mouse up is to subclass the cell and override the appropriate ...


5

There is a trick that I use (but didn't invent) for such situations. First, in IB, designate the slider as "continuous", so that you'll get action messages as the slider is moved. Then, in the action method, do this: [NSObject cancelPreviousPerformRequestsWithTarget: self selector: @selector(finishTrack) object: nil ]; [self performSelector: ...


4

The method is executing. You're just crashing because you're trying to execute a method that doesn't exist. The problem is this line: NSString *opacity = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d",[optOndoorzichtigheidSlider value]]; NSSlider does not have a value method. It has a doubleValue method that returns a double.


4

The simplest way is to create a NSView subclass that handles both the mouse management and the drawing. There is a sample code that can help you to start named "TLayer". It is part of the Examples of the XCode 3.1.4. It contains a circular custom view that controls the offset and the radius of the shadow drawn for layers. It is easy to understand and easy ...


4

Ask the event if isDirectionInvertedFromDevice, and multiply the delta by -1 if so.


4

I am a beginner in Objective-c. I also ran into this problem! Here is the solution to find that I spent two days))) Save and restore GraphicsState: [NSGraphicsContext restoreGraphicsState]; //... [leftBarImage drawInRect:leftRect fromRect: NSZeroRect operation: NSCompositeSourceOver fraction:1]; //... [rightBarImage drawInRect:rightRect fromRect: NSZeroRect ...


3

you should keep track of the old value of the slider, and then compare with the new one to see if it has moved down or up. - (IBAction)slide:(id)sender { float newValue = [slider floatValue]; if (newValue < oldValue) { // moved down } else { // moved up } oldValue = newValue; }


3

Ok - so this isn't as quick and pretty as I hoped but it works. You can't actually use animators and Core Animation on the slider knob - because Core Animation works only on layers and there's no access to the knob values in the slider layer. So we have to resort instead to manually animating slider value. Since we're doing this on a Mac - you can use ...


3

Simply set the frame and bounds of the NSSlider (which is really a subclass of NSView) so it is higher. Then your drawing should work fine. Stick this code in awakeFromNib: (Replace slider with self if you're in its subclass.) NSRect frameRect = [slider frame]; frameRect.size.height = 30; [slider setFrame:frameRect]; NSRect boundsRect = [slider bounds]; ...


3

This will do the trick - I just copied and pasted it out of one of my projects, so there are a few extraneous variables and functions but you should be able to get the gist of it: BOOL gotMaster = NO; BOOL gotLeft = NO; BOOL gotRight = NO; float volume = 1, lvolume = 1, rvolume = 1; float inVolume = 1, inLvolume = 1, inRvolume = 1; OSStatus result = noErr; ...


3

It seems that Kperryua's idea would provide the cleanest solution so I will mark that as the accepted answer, but I ended using a bit of a hack that worked for my specific situation so I thought I might share that as well. The app that I am making needs to be cross platform so I am using Cocotron (an open source project that implements much of the Cocoa ...


3

Follow Cocoa's MVC design. Your text field and slider should take the values they present from some model object, and when the user manipulates them should push the new value to that model object. You should not be using an NSTextField as an "intermediary" between another NSControl and a model object.


3

I played around for a bit and at least got off to a pretty good start with an NSSliderCell subclass. MDSliderCell.h: #import <Cocoa/Cocoa.h> @interface MDSliderCell : NSSliderCell { BOOL tracking; } @end MDSliderCell.m: #import "MDSliderCell.h" @implementation MDSliderCell - (BOOL)startTrackingAt:(NSPoint)startPoint inView:(NSView ...


3

Use an NSWindow. Make it borderless and non-opaque so you can define its shape through a background image. Convert coordinates so you can position the "popover" window relative to the slider. Make it a child of the window containing the slider so that weird stuff doesn't happen with the Window menu, Exposé/Mission Control, etc.


3

You could also simply check the type of the current event in the action method: - (IBAction)sliderChanged:(id)sender { NSEvent *currentEvent = [[sender window] currentEvent]; if ([currentEvent type] == NSLeftMouseUp) { // the slider was let go } }


3

First, I created an image of a slider bar and copied it in my project. Then I used this image in the drawBarInside method to draw in the bar rect before the normal one, so we'll see only the remainder part (I wanted to keep the blue part intact). This has to be done in a subclass of NSSliderCell: class CustomSliderCell: NSSliderCell { let bar: ...


2

Remove all the -lockFocus and -unlockFocus messages. The framework will take care of setting up the drawing context for you before -drawBarInside:flipped: or -drawKnob: are ever sent. Also, you shouldn't be creating any objects within a draw method.


2

I wouldn't say that your approach is completely wrong, but it'd probably be easier to create a view (or perhaps a control) that contains both a slider and a text field. It doesn't sound like you want to change the way the slider displays itself -- you just want a text field next to the slider, and for the value in the field to be tied to the position of the ...


2

The action could be the name of the action method that you already are using for your slider, and the target should be the class instance where that method is implemented. So, for example, if you had an IBAction in your app delegate that was connected to your slider called sliderReport: then do this: [self sendAction:@selector(sliderReport:) to:[NSApp ...


2

I found an answer myself. Although the answer of @rdelmar might also work, it won't anymore if you change the name of the action method. I found a universal way of triggering the action method manually: - (void) mouseDown:(NSEvent *)theEvent { if ( ([theEvent modifierFlags] & NSCommandKeyMask) != 0) { [self setFloatValue:100.0f]; ...



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