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In Objective C (), you use the NSTimer class to create timer objects or, more simply, timers. A timer waits until a certain time interval has elapsed and then fires, sending a specified message to a target object. For example, you could create an NSTimer object that sends a message to a window, telling it to update itself after a certain time interval.

Timers work in conjunction with run loops. To use a timer effectively, you should be aware of how run loops operate—see NSRunLoop and Threading Programming Guide. Note in particular that run loops retain their timers, so you can release a timer after you have added it to a run loop.

A timer is not a real-time mechanism; it fires only when one of the run loop modes to which the timer has been added is running and able to check if the timer’s firing time has passed. Because of the various input sources a typical run loop manages, the effective resolution of the time interval for a timer is limited to on the order of 50-100 milliseconds. If a timer’s firing time occurs during a long callout or while the run loop is in a mode that is not monitoring the timer, the timer does not fire until the next time the run loop checks the timer. Therefore, the actual time at which the timer fires potentially can be a significant period of time after the scheduled firing time.

NSTimer is “toll-free bridged” with its Core Foundation () counterpart, CFRunLoopTimerRef. See “Toll-Free Bridging” for more information on toll-free bridging.

Additional examples for the NSTimer object can be found here.

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