New answers tagged

0

I tried the answer by @NJones but it didn't work. With a little juggling, I found that you should use NSRunLoopCommonModes, not NSDefaultRunLoopMode on mainRunLoop. For example, [[NSRunLoop mainRunLoop] addTimer:schedulerTimer forMode:NSRunLoopCommonModes]; Or Swift, which I now use: NSRunLoop.mainRunLoop().addTimer(schedulerTimer, forMode: ...


1

This is completely unrelated to Swift whatsoever. You probably scheduled the NSTimer using the default method, which results in adding it to a runloop in a way that it's not triggered while scrolling. You need to add it to the main runloop with a NSRunLoopCommonModes mode instead. E.g. let timer = NSTimer(timeInterval: 1.0, target: self, selector: ...


1

Well, in the most basic sense, a model can communicate with controller using delegates, protocols, notification etc. For example According to a source, link to which I will provide at the end of this post, three common patterns for model to send data to Controller are: Delegation Notification Center Key value observing Main source of information is ...


0

You would do it like this (for every 1/10s): NSTimer.scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval(0.1, target: self, selector: #selector(youFuncHere), userInfo: nil, repeats: true)


0

By default, NSTimer does not have this feature. Right way is do your job with dates and comparing it. By the way, you can do a nice extension like this: public extension NSTimer { var elapsedTime: NSTimeInterval? { if let startDate = self.userInfo as? NSDate { return NSDate().timeIntervalSinceDate(startDate) } return ...


0

Few small steps: Define the start time: (should happen at the same time you start the timer) startTime = (NSDate.timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate()) Measure the time difference let elapsed = NSDate.timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate() - startTime


0

It's not "self.t", you supply the object as the target. The selector is something like "ViewController.t" or "t". You need to change Start to take a target object as well. Move to Xcode 7.3.1 and use the new selector syntax if you can -- it will be type-checked.


0

Here is nice solution for javascript users: func setTimeout(delay:NSTimeInterval, block:()->Void) -> NSTimer { return NSTimer.scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval(delay, target: NSBlockOperation(block: block), selector: #selector(NSOperation.main), userInfo: nil, repeats: false) } and usage: setTimeout(0.3, block: {() -> Void in ...


1

I might understand that you don't want to declare the counter in app delegate, for whatever reason you might have,although I would recommend it. However you can call the functions I mentioned, from the same class in which you have defined the counter. You would need to call it like this: override func viewDidLoad() { super.viewDidLoad() ...


0

In your app delegate you can use this method : func applicationWillResignActive(application: UIApplication) {} The code you add in this function will run right before your app goes in the background . Therefore you can write there the code to stop the counter. Afterwards you need to use the following function to activate the counter again: func ...


0

Basically an asynchronous timer doesn't work in a Playground and a since the top level of a Playground isn't a class there is no self property. To test NSTimer in a Playground Wrap the timer in a class. Import XCPlaygound. Add XCPlaygroundPage.currentPage.needsIndefiniteExecution = true to enable support of asynchronous tasks.


0

self refers to the object for which a method (a function defined within a class) is defined, so can only be used in a method. (It is the equivalent of this in C++/Java/Javascript.) In your code, sayHello() is a global function, not a method, so there is no self to refer to. In order for the scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval() function call to work with those ...


0

Usually using uppercase to the properties name it's considered as a bad attitude, you should use swiftTimer. These expressions are not allowed ad the top level: var SwiftTimer = NSTimer() SwiftTimer = NSTimer.scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval(1, target:self, selector: Selector("sayHello"), userInfo: nil, repeats: true) You must put it in a function like for ...


0

Swift 2.x : func DisplayTimer() { Timer = NSTimer.scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval(1.0, target:self, selector: #selector(updateTimer), userInfo: nil, repeats: true) } func updateTimer() { if Counter != 0 { TimerLabel.text = "\(Counter -= 1)" } else { Timer.invalidate() // call a game over method here... } } override ...


0

If you want to start your timer when the scene loads call DisplayTimer() under override func viewDidLoad() when the view is loaded Also if you want to update your label every second, the selector in your NSTimer is calling updateCounter not updateTimer


0

Using #selector will check your code at compile time to make sure the method you want to call actually exists. Even better, if the method doesn’t exist, you’ll get a compile error: Xcode will refuse to build your app, thus banishing to oblivion another possible source of bugs. override func viewDidLoad() { super.viewDidLoad() ...


1

If you set the timer to nil then the reference is broken and you can't invalidate it, so you must call invalidate first. Ensure that you always check the reference and invalidate when you're going to create a new timer as that also breaks any reference to the old timer. Also, never create a dummy / placeholder timer with Timer(), you require an optional ...


0

Try: Putting outlets before method Checking that the outlets are connected Check that the outlet name in the storyboard is the same as in the code


0

Ok I've found source of problems. When Socket Rocket receives notification that space is available it doesn't process this notification immediately, but dispatches notification to working queue and does processing there. So when - (NSInteger)write:(const uint8_t *)buffer maxLength:(NSUInteger)len method is invoked current event loop is associated with ...


0

You may use the UIBackgroundModes, certainly "Newsstand downloads": The app is a Newsstand app that downloads and processes magazine or newspaper content in the background. Also you can visit Raywenderlich guide


1

You would only need the myUpdate() function: func myUpdate() { if count > 0 { count -= 1 timerLabel.text = "\(count)" } else if count == 0 { myTimer.invalidate() timerLabel.text = "Yes!" } }


5

The problem is that this function is missing half its logic: func myUpdate() { if(count > 0) { count -= 1 timerLabel.text = "\(count)" } } That code is called every time the timer fires. It says what to do if count > 0, but you have completely forgotten to say what to do in the crucial case where count == 0!


1

I was looking for the same thing. I found this Github Gist by Nate Cook, which is an NSTimer extension that allows you to pass in a closure. The following code is copied from from with Gist with the comments removed. See the link above for the full and/or updated version. extension NSTimer { class func schedule(delay delay: NSTimeInterval, handler: ...


0

Ok. After struggling for 3days, it is working for me for sending latitude and longitude when app is in background even after 3 mins. I checked my app, continuously sending lat long for more than a hour in background. It can help some one at least. First Please add below two keys in your pList. 1.NSLocationAlwaysUsageDescription ...


0

Use Core Animation to animate the rotation. The window server will do all the work outside of your app's process. let animation = CABasicAnimation(keyPath: "transform.rotation") animation.fromValue = 0 animation.toValue = 2 * M_PI animation.repeatCount = .infinity animation.duration = 1.25 iconView.layer.addAnimation(animation, forKey: animation.keyPath)


0

I think you can use dispatch_source from @Rob's answer: Swift - Do something every x minutes Here is the code: var timer: dispatch_source_t! func startTimer() { let queue = dispatch_queue_create("com.domain.app.timer", nil) timer = dispatch_source_create(DISPATCH_SOURCE_TYPE_TIMER, 0, 0, queue) dispatch_source_set_timer(timer, ...


3

You observed correctly how an NSTimer behaves. If you create a timer right now that should fire every ten minutes, it will try to fire ten minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes and so on from now. If the app goes to sleep after one minute and wakes up after 12 minutes, the timer will fire immediately, and then again at 20 minutes (not ten minutes after the timer ...


0

You can't use timers for this problem. Here is what I discovered after investigating a similar problem: After an app has been in the background for about 30 seconds, the timer stops. When you re-enter from background the timer starts to fire again. What you can do to overcome this problem and add this functionality properly you would have to implement ...


0

Indeed your timer fires after your label is updated, what you can do : Delay the call to your function hideAfterAPlayerHasWon by one or two second so you are sure that your timer has already fired. if !(rightPlayer.isAlive) { let yourDelayTime = (Int64(NSEC_PER_SEC) * NUMBER_SECOND_DELAY) dispatch_after(dispatch_time(DISPATCH_TIME_NOW, yourDelayTime), ...


0

what's the scope of NSTimer() It doesn't have a "scope". Once you've scheduled it, it belongs to the NSRunLoop which owns it and is responsible for firing it. If it's a nonrepeating timer, it goes out of existence after it has fired. That has nothing to do with your problem. You have an elementary logic mistake: onLeftPlayerAttackPressed sets up the ...


0

In AppDelegate.h set applicationDidEnterBackground: UIBackgroundTaskIdentifier locationUpdater =[[UIApplication sharedApplication] beginBackgroundTaskWithExpirationHandler:^{ [[UIApplication sharedApplication] endBackgroundTask:locationUpdater]; locationUpdater=UIBackgroundTaskInvalid; } ]; This tells the os that you still have ...


1

The error you're getting is pretty obscure. What it's trying to tell you is you should remove the () from the end of your timerFired in the #selector. var timer = NSTimer( timeInterval: 1.0, target: self, selector: #selector(TestTimer.timerFired), userInfo: nil, repeats: true) However, this isn't going to make your code how you want ...


0

This is how a timer is initialized var timer = NSTimer.scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval(1.0 , target: self, selector: #selector(TestTimer.timerFired()), userInfo: nil, repeats: true)


0

Use the following code: NSTimer* timer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval: 60.0 target: self selector: @selector(timerFired:) userInfo: nil repeats: YES]; - (void)timerFired:(NSTimer*)theTimer{ if(condition){ [theTimer isValid]; //recall the NSTimer //implement your methods }else{ [theTimer ...


0

You seem to be confused about what an NSTimer is. It's not a "timer" like a stopwatch. It provides a means for executing a method asynchronously at certain intervals (eg. "call this method every 1 second"). While the following is a little overkill, it uses MVC to illustrate the point. Code example taken from the "Teaching App Development with Swift" ...


-1

var TotalTime:Int = 0 var timer: NSTimer? triggerCountDownTimerFor(time:Int) func triggerCountDownTimerFor(time:Int) { totalTime = time timer = NSTimer.scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval(1, target:self, selector: #selector(LoginViewController.updateTimer), userInfo: nil, repeats: true) } func updateTimer() { let date = NSDate() let formatter : ...


0

What I suggest you is to fire a NSNotification when you want to start your func every minute. When you receive your NSNotification call a function like this : var yourTimer = NSTimer() func callWhenNotificationReceived(){ yourFuncToFire() yourTimer = NSTimer.scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval(60, target: self, selector: ...


1

Because you forgot to update the label: if (currentSeconds > 9) { countDown.text = "0\(currentMins):\(currentSeconds)" currentSeconds -= 1 } else if ( currentSeconds > 0) && (currentSeconds <= 9) { countDown.text = "0\(currentMins):0\(currentSeconds)" currentSeconds -= 1 } else { countDown.text = "0\(currentMins):00" ...


5

You can actually call: NSTimer.scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval(ti: NSTimeInterval, target: AnyObject, selector: #Selector, userInfo: AnyObject?, repeats: Bool) Use it like this: NSTimer.scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval(1, target: ...


0

I think your problem is that delayFunc() is in viewDidLoad, the selector is looking in the viewController but can't find the function (because it is in viewDidLoad) Edit: I wasn't 100% clear about why the selector can't find delayFunc when it's in viewDidLoad. If you declare a function within another function's body it's lifetime is at most the lifetime of ...


0

Turns out that two things were the problem. 1) I had defined the method outside the class, 2) However also the following syntax was needed for it work: selector: #selector(addNext as () -> ())


1

One solution is to keep a dictionary like this: var pendingExits = Dictionary<CLBeaconRegion,NSDate>() Each time you get a didExitRegion call: Only start the NSTimer if the dictionary is empty -- otherwise, assume the timer is already running. Add the region to the dictionary along with a new NSDate() to set the timestamp of when it was added. ...


1

Have you tried this. backgroundTimer = NSTimer.scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval(3, target: self, selector: #selector(GameViewController.addNext), userInfo: nil, repeats: true) or backgroundTimer = NSTimer.scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval(3, target: gvc, selector: #selector(gvc.addNext), userInfo: nil, repeats: true)


2

Probably your code is in different modules. If so you should make your func addNext() public: public func addNext() { ... }


2

backgroundTimer = NSTimer.scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval(3, target: self, selector: Selector("addNext"), userInfo: nil, repeats: true)


4

This would not be the way that I would do a countdown timer. @IBAction func start(sender: UIButton) { self.timer = NSTimer.scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval(1.0, target: self, selector: #selector(ViewController.update(_:)), userInfo: nil, repeats: true) NSRunLoop.currentRunLoop().addTimer(self.timer, forMode: NSRunLoopCommonModes) startTime = ...


1

When you pass GameViewController() for the target, Swift creates a temporary instance of GameViewController, and gives it to NSTimer as the target for the addNext call. This is most certainly not what you want: you need a call to be made on the instance of your view controller, not on some temporary instance. If you make timer registration from a method of ...


0

Every time your move became 0 when method get called. declared it as instance variable and set it's initial value 0 (in your case) in createCar method. I think this you want. hope this will help :)


4

Polling is your worst case scenario here. It's something that shouldn't be done unless there is absolutely no other way, as it's terrible for performance and especially battery life, especially if your intention is to do so every 30 seconds in the background, forever. Users will notice that your app is burning their battery and will blame your app for their ...


0

The reason that additional calls to createCar creates motionless, but still visible cars, is because the callback on the timer, moveCar, only has reference to the most recently created car stored in the _car ivar. The past created cars are still visible because the view they were added to still holds reference to them and consequently continues to draw ...



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