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686

In Xcode 4.x press ⌥⌘R (or click Menubar > Product > Scheme > Edit Scheme) select the "Diagnostics" tab and click "Enable Zombie Objects": This turns released objects into NSZombie instances that print console warnings when used again. This is a debugging aid that increases memory use (no object is really released) but improves error reporting. A ...


330

Environment variables are now part of the "scheme". If you edit the scheme you want to turn on zombies for (in the "Product" menu, select "Edit Scheme"), go to the "Run Foo.app" stage in the left panel, and the "Arguments" tab on the right. You can then add NSZombieEnabled to the "Environment Variables" section and set the value to YES, as you could in ...


96

I encountered the same problem with troubleshooting EXC_BAD_ACCESS and had hard time to find the setting with Xcode 4.2 (the latest one that comes with iOS5 SDK). Apple keeps on moving things and the settings are no longer where they used to be. Fortunately, I've found it and it works for the device, not just Simulator. You need to open the Product menu in ...


79

It's a memory debugging aid. Specifically, when you set NSZombieEnabled then whenever an object reaches retain count 0, rather than begin deallocated it morphs itself into an NSZombie instance. Whenever such a zombie receives a message, it logs a warning rather than crashing or behaving in an unpredictable way. As such, you can debug subtle ...


69

Jano's answer is the easiest way to find it.. another way would be if you click on the scheme drop down bar -> edit scheme -> arguments tab and then add NSZombieEnabled in the Environment Variables column and YES in the value column...


68

The error message indicates a message is being sent to a deallocated instance of InAppPurchaseManager, which is your class. And it's happening after you open the view (creating an instance), close the view (releasing an instance), then opening the view again (creating a second instance). And the problem is happening within the addPayment: call. This ...


54

Adam did a great job explaining what Zombies are, but using the environment variable is not the best way to find and track these. A much better approach to zombie detection, is just to use Instruments - from XCode start with "Run with Instrument" and choose "Allocations". Then stop the recording right after it starts, press the "i" button on the ...


49

I find this alternative more convenient: Click the "Run Button Dropdown" From the list choose Profile The program "Instruments" should open where you can also choose Zombies Now you can interact with your app and try to cause the error As soon as the error happens you should get a hint on when your object was released and therefore deallocated. As soon ...


39

Product > Profile will launch Instruments and then you there should be a "Trace Template" named "Zombies". However this trace template is only available if the current build destination is the simulator - it will not be available if you have the destination set to your iOS device. Also another thing to note is that there is no actual Zombies instrument in ...


36

Profile your application in the simulator with 'Zombies' Instrument. Run your app for a while and do whatever you have to do to make your app crash. When it does, you will get a pop up like the image below and it will halt the profiling of the app: Then if you click on the little arrow next to the address (0x158b3c00) .. it will take you to the object ...


29

You have a plain old crash. EXC_BAD_ACCESS means that your application has tried to access a memory address that is invalid. While the most typical reason for this in a non-GC'd objective-c application is messaging an object after deallocation, something that Zombie Mode detects, this particular crash can happen any number of other ways (as demonstrated). ...


22

It's a simple matter of setting an environment variable on your executable (NSZombieEnabled = YES), and then running/debugging your app as normal. If you message a zombie, your app will crash/break to debugger and NSLog a message for you. For more information, check out this CocoaDev page: http://www.cocoadev.com/index.pl?NSZombieEnabled Also, this ...


19

Product > Profile will pop up Instruments. Select zombies from the panel and go nuts.


15

another way would be if you click on the scheme drop down bar -> edit scheme -> arguments tab and then add NSZombieEnabled in the Environment Variables column and YES in the value column...


14

The problem you describe could be one of a couple of things; you may be over-releasing an object or you might be corrupting memory. If you corrupt memory -- corrupt the first few bytes of an object, specifically -- then it can easily manifest as a crash during an autorelease pool drain (or any other message). That the crash happens on a device, but not ...


14

To edit environment variables, go to Menu Product / Edit Scheme…, select the desired configuration (you probably want 'Run') from the left sidebar first and then click on the Arguments tab. Environment variables are configurable there.


13

This likely means you are trying to retain an object a UI object, such as a UIButton, that was released. There are a number of ways to track down this issue but if you can narrow down where this is occurring in your app, I generally start commenting out releases until I see where the problematic release is. My guess is you released something that was ...


13

You will get the leak above the object allocation bar. Check this image; For a reference, check this video


12

I agree with what Kendall added, very useful, but I'll suggest still doing the environment variable so you don't forget they're enabled. Similar to the link at Cocoa Dev, I put this so I don't miss it: if(getenv("NSZombieEnabled") || getenv("NSAutoreleaseFreedObjectCheckEnabled")) { NSLog(@"ZOMBIES/AFOC ARE ENABLED!!! AAAAARRRRRRGH!!! BRAINS!!!"); } ...


12

In xcode 4.2 Goto, Product -> edit scheme -> click Run yourappname.app -> Diagonostics -> Enable Zombie object.


12

The answer is trivial and hasn't anything to do with retain counters... I oversaw that it isn't allowed to name variables/properties starting with new with ARC enabled. This obviously resulted in an over release thus generating the error... From Apple documentation: ...


10

"EXC_BAD_ACCESS" is not necessarily related to a zombie instance. It can be linked an access to an undefined reference, like a local variable. NSArray *array; [array objectAtIndex:0]; // <- Will throw an error Edit: NSZombie flag will only help you to solve the "EXC_BAD_ACCESS" triggered by the use of a de-allocated instance. In order to solve the ...


10

First, that is a malloc block, not an object. Zombies won't work (and would never have worked in prior versions either). How many times does that leak happen? Once? Don't worry about it. Once per stream? file a bug -- that isn't in your code from what you have posted so far (unless your code is calling strdup, which is certainly possible but atypical in ...


8

Here's a video and explaination how to use Instruments and NSZombie to find and fix memory crashes on iOS: http://www.markj.net/iphone-memory-debug-nszombie/


8

I got this very useful answer from Apple regarding my own question. It is verbatim - ME: Is there an update as to how to find those tough deallocated objects, testing on the device, using Xcode 4.1.1 and/or Instruments ? APPLE: First up, the hack shown above [in Apple's Forum] has been obsoleted by internal changes to the OS, namely, Zombie setup is now ...


7

You're invoking undefined behaviour by accessing freed memory. It might crash, it might work fine, it might result in dancing unicorns spewing forth from your nose. To detect memory errors whilst you're developing code, you should enable NSZombie's, see instructions here: http://www.cocoadev.com/index.pl?NSZombieEnabled Update You might wonder why it ...


7

It's not a compile option. It's an environment variable. There is no danger leaving it on, because it is not part of the application bundle you will release. It does make it impossible to find leaks, so you might not want to leave it enabled.


7

You need to cancel the NSURLConnection before you dispose it's delegate. Simply keep a reference to the NSURLConnection in your UIView that acts as a delegate and call [urlConnection cancel]. After you release a message you need to set your pointer to it to nil if you continue using that pointer. As an example: id myObject = [[SomeObject alloc] init]; /* ...


7

I think I've been able to work around this problem. Here's another question talks about workarounds: UISearchDisplayController causes crash after viewDidUnload So I added: @property (nonatomic, weak) IBOutlet UISearchBar *searchBar; @property (nonatomic) UISearchDisplayController *searchController; And then in viewDidLoad: UISearchDisplayController ...


6

Also make sure you initialize all pointers to nil before using them! If you use a pointer without initializing it to nil or any other object, you are propably going to end up accessing memory which isn't yours. For example the following code will also give an EXC_BAD_ACCESS which is not traceable using the NSZombieEnabled flag caused by the last line. ...



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