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66

From MSDN: In string concatenation operations, the C# compiler treats a null string the same as an empty string, Even though xyz is null, calling the += operator (which is converted to a call to the + operator (*)) on it does not throw a NullReferenceException because it's a static method. In pseudo code: xyz = String.+(null, null); The ...


50

First invocation will call String.valueOf(Object) method, as you have explicitly typecasted null to Object reference. Whereas the 2nd one will invoke the overloaded String.valueOf(char[]) method, as char[] is more specific to Object for a null argument. There are other overloaded versions of this method, which take primitive types, but are not valid match ...


48

In IL on this level, null is just null. The compiler knew it was null because that is what you wrote, as such the compiler does not need to call the cast operator at all. Casting null to an object will just yield null. So this is a compile-time "optimization" or simplification if you will. Since this is legal, to cast null to another object type, there is ...


44

I believe no, since there is no difference in compiled IL. var x = null as object; var x1 = (object)null; object x2 = null; gets compiled to IL_0001: ldnull IL_0002: stloc.0 // x IL_0003: ldnull IL_0004: stloc.1 // x1 IL_0005: ldnull IL_0006: stloc.2 // x2 You can see all the locals are initialized to null ...


41

The ECMAScript spec (5.1) defines isFinite to act as such: isFinite (number) Returns false if the argument coerces to NaN, +∞, or −∞, and otherwise returns true. If ToNumber(number) is NaN, +∞, or −∞, return false. Otherwise, return true. In other words, isFinite is calling ToNumber on whatever's passed in, and then comparing it to ...


40

(this.Result == Result.OK) OK; let's take this piece by piece: this.(anything) That can fail if this is null - which it never should be, but theoretically can be if you are evil - so we could fail with a NullReferenceException. this.Result if that is a property accessor (a get), then it could fail in any way it likes - it could throw an exception. ...


39

Best to write: if (variable === undefined || variable === null) { //do something } This way it's crystal clear what cases you want to catch. Using == to catch both as encouraged in another answer is very unwise....someone reading your code who may be unaware of the difference between == and === will think you're only catching null and will be unaware ...


33

The field annotated @Autowired is null because Spring doesn't know about the copy of MileageFeeCalculator that you created with new and didn't know to autowire it. The Spring Inversion of Control (IoC) container has three main logical components: a registry (called the ApplicationContext) of components (beans) that are available to be used by the ...


26

I am a fan of always including null explicitly as that carries meaning. While omitting a property leaves ambiguity. As long as your protocol with the server is agreed upon any of the above can work, but if you pass nulls from the server I believe that makes your APIs more flexible later. Should also mention that javascript's hasOwnProperty function gives ...


24

You can always add it exactly for your application angular.isUndefinedOrNull = function(val) { return angular.isUndefined(val) || val === null }


24

When you use the += operator, you are actually calling the string.Concat method, that, as stated in the documentation: The method concatenates str0 and str1; it does not add any delimiters. An Empty string is used in place of any null argument. In fact this code: string xyz = null; xyz += xyz; will be compiled in: IL_0000: ldnull IL_0001: ...


21

In Java there's at least one case when you need to cast a null to some type, and that is when using overloaded methods to tell the compiler which method you want to execute (I assume this is the case in C# as well). Since a null is 0 (or whatever pointer null represents) no matter what type it is you won't see any difference in the compiled code though ...


19

findViewById() returns a View if it exists in the layout you provided in setContentView(), otherwise it returns null and that's what happening to you. Example if you setContentView(R.layout.activity_first); and then call findViewById(R.id.first_View); it will return a View which is your layout, But if you call findViewById(R.id.second_View); it will return ...


19

Combining the above answers, it seems the most complete answer would be: if (typeof(variable) == 'undefined' || variable == null) { // Do stuff } This should work for any variable that is either undeclared or declared and explicitly set to null or undefined. The boolean expression should evaluate to false for any declared variable that has an actual ...


19

There are basically 4 techniques for this task, all of them standard SQL. NOT EXISTS Most of the time, this is fastest in Postgres. SELECT ip FROM login_log l WHERE NOT EXISTS ( SELECT 1 -- it is mostly irrelevant what you put here FROM ip_location i WHERE l.ip = i.ip ); Also consider: What is easier to read in EXISTS ...


16

One of the subtle design rules of C# is that C# never infers a type that wasn't in the expression to begin with. Since Animal is not in the expression d ?? c, the type Animal is not a choice. This principle applies everywhere that C# infers types. For example: var x = new[] { dog1, dog2, dog3, dog4, cat }; // Error The compiler does not say "this must ...


15

There are lots of overloaded String.valueOf methods in Java. Further, in Java null has any and all types so that anything (that isn't a primitive) can be null. So, when you call (String.valueOf((Object)null) you call the valueOf method that takes an Object as use explicitly cast null to Object. In the second example you don't explicitly cast the null to ...


14

The best to get rid of this is to keep activity reference when onAttach is called and use the activity reference wherever needed, for e.g. @Override public void onAttach(Activity activity) { super.onAttach(activity); mActivity = activity; }


14

I accomplished this by doing the following: String weekDay; SimpleDateFormat dayFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("EEEE", Locale.US); Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance(); weekDay = dayFormat.format(calendar.getTime()); Use the day format for "EEEE" will return the full weekday name, i.e. Tuesday Use the day format for "E" will return the the ...


14

Because the spec says so. See §6.1.5, §6.2 and §7.7.6 of the C# 5 standard. To quote only the relevant parts: §7.7.6 Cast expressions A cast-expression of the form (T)E, where T is a type and E is a unary-expression, performs an explicit conversion (§6.2) of the value of E to type T. [... T]he result is the value produced by the explicit conversion. ...


13

From MDN: The global isFinite() function determines whether the passed value is a finite number. If needed, the parameter is first converted to a number. So, it's converted to a number... isFinite(null) isFinite(+null) //convert to a number isFinite(0) // true because +null or Number(null) = 0 The spec says that the global isFinite() method will ...


12

You are attempting to concatenate a value to null. This is governed by "String Conversion", which occurs when one operand is a String, and that is covered by the JLS, Section 5.1.11: Now only reference values need to be considered: If the reference is null, it is converted to the string "null" (four ASCII characters n, u, l, l).


11

Both are checking to see if the delegate associated with the event is null. The purpose of storage into the local is to prevent a TOCTOU-style race in multithreaded code. It is important to note that using a local only eliminates one of two potential races. See my 2009 article on the subject for details: ...


11

If you want to check for the existence of an object why not use exists? if Truck.exists?(10) # your truck exists in the database else # the truck doesn't exists end The exists? method has the advantage that is not selecting the record from the database (meaning is faster than selecting the record). The query looks like: SELECT 1 FROM trucks where ...


11

How did Nullable<T> become an exception to the rule "You can't assign null to a value type?" By changing the language, basically. The null literal went from being "a null reference" to "the null value of the relevant type". At execution time, "the null value" for a nullable value type is a value where the HasValue property returns false. So this: ...


11

The problem is that nested types are separated with a + rather than a . in the IL name. If you write: Console.WriteLine(typeof(global::Homework.Homework.Functions)); then you'll see the fully qualified name as far as the CLR is concerned. So you want: Type.GetType("Homework.Homework+Functions") Assuming you really need to get it by name - avoid this ...


11

It is because Null is undefined. Null neither equal nor not equal to anything. Please read more on MSDN. Null values can be checked with is null (or is not null), or isnull() or coalesce() functions depending on the requirement. Try this: SELECT * FROM Fruit WHERE Banana is null And following query to select all the records in case if @FruitInput is ...


11

This is because the first Database is shadowed by the second. Replace: Ticket * Database; if(!DB_Manager_Initialize) { Ticket * Database =(Ticket*)malloc(sizeof(Ticket)); By: Ticket *Database; if(!DB_Manager_Initialize) { Database = malloc(sizeof(Ticket));


11

isFinite calls ToNumber on its argument. So > Number(null) 0 > Number(document) NaN > isFinite(0) true > isFinite(NaN) false > isFinite(null) true > isFinite(document) false


11

You have defined Buscador busc1; in the main body of the class so instead of: Buscador busc1 = new Buscador(50); simply write busc1 = new Buscador(50); By doing the first one, you are saying that you want to create an instance of Buscador local to the method instantiating it. Therefore, it is removed once the method ends and is not accessible from any ...



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