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78

Catching NullPointerException is a really problematic thing to do since they can happen almost anywhere. It's very easy to get one from a bug, catch it by accident and continue as if everything is normal, thus hiding a real problem. It's so tricky to deal with so it's best to avoid altogether. (For example, think about auto-unboxing of a null Integer.) I ...


5

This results from the JLS rules of determining the type of the ternary conditional expression : If one of the second and third operands is of primitive type T, and the type of the other is the result of applying boxing conversion (ยง5.1.7) to T, then the type of the conditional expression is T. This rule means that the type of the ternary expression is ...


3

Create a BroadcastReceiver object in your MainActivity class as follows: private BroadcastReceiver mMessageReceiver = new BroadcastReceiver() { @Override public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) { // Extract data included in the Intent } }; Also instead to using periodic checks in the MainActivity, instead create a Timer ...


3

It happens because 0.0 is of type double, not Double. The second two operands to the conditional operator must be of the same type, so autoboxing/unboxing came into it and the compiler turned that code into: x = Double.valueOf(a == null ? 0.0 : a.getY().doubleValue()); // -^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^--------------------------^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ...which throws because a....


3

A NullPointerException is not a sub-class of BlewIt. Therefore catching BlewIt doesn't catch NullPointerException. If you want to catch BlewIt, you should throw new BlewIt () in blowUp().


3

You must link your connect variable to your database connect = DriverManager.getConnection("jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521:XE", "SHID","pikachu"); if you don't do that connect will be a null variable, so you get a NullPointerException


3

As already pointed out by Tom in the comment, Following statement disobeys the Law of Demeter, wsObject.getFoo().getBar().getBaz().getInt() What you want is int and you can get it from Foo. Law of Demeter says, never talk to the strangers. For your case you can hide the actual implementation under the hood of Foo and Bar. Now, you can create method in ...


2

To improve readability, you may want to use multiple variables, like Foo theFoo; Bar theBar; Baz theBaz; theFoo = wsObject.getFoo(); if ( theFoo == null ) { // Exit. } theBar = theFoo.getBar(); if ( theBar == null ) { // Exit. } theBaz = theBar.getBaz(); if ( theBaz == null ) { // Exit. } return theBaz.getInt();


2

Assuming the class structure is indeed out of our control, as seems to be the case, I think catching the NPE as suggested in the question is indeed a reasonable solution, unless performance is a major concern. One small improvement might be to wrap the throw/catch logic to avoid clutter: static <T> T get(Supplier<T> supplier, T defaultValue) { ...


2

Error in your view holder class therefore it is crashing, as you are not setting tag for view holder when you are creating so change your getView method by below. @Override public View getView(int position, View convertView, ViewGroup parent) { AdvertContent content = getItem(position); LayoutInflater inflater = (LayoutInflater) mContext....


2

Quoting from your logcat: Caused by: java.lang.NullPointerException: Attempt to invoke virtual method 'android.content.res.Resources android.content.Context.getResources()' on a null object reference at android.content.ContextWrapper.getResources(ContextWrapper.java:87) at android.view.ContextThemeWrapper.getResources(ContextThemeWrapper....


2

public class Distance extends Application Do not randomly extend classes, just because you think that it will clear up a compiler error. You do not have a valid Application subclass here, and you are not using it properly. Step #1: Remove extends Application from Distance. Step #2: Have getDistance() take a Context as a parameter, and have it use that ...


2

The problem of nullPointerException is not because you cancel the AsyncTask, but because you trying to finish the caller activity. Your activity could be destroyed before your AsyncTask finish working its process. So, instead using Activity activity; Change to: WeakReference<Activity> activityWeakRef; Then in your constructor change to: public ...


2

Its because your Textview is Empty when the you use textview.toString() in onCreateViewHolder() Log.d("view",v.toString()); Log.d("textView",viewHolder.textViewName.toString()); Move this two statements to onBindViewHolder() instead. Hope that solves your Problem EDIT: Answer According to your edited question. Can you try this something like this ...


1

I had this error because I forgot to initialize GLFW. Very strange because I called some GLFW functions before it worked.


1

Make your selectDate(...) a method of the BuyTicket class by taking it out of the ActionListener's scope. Then after you've done your first database search and have filled the first JComboBox, directly call this method, passing in the first item from the first JComboBox. i.e., change this: public class BuyTicket { //... public JPanel ...


1

Your MainController should implement Initializable and you should set the controller in your fxml : e.g. <AnchorPane fx:controller="yourpackagename.MainController"> ..... </AnchorPane> Remove MainController from the start Method : @Override public void start(Stage primaryStage) throws Exception { Parent root = FXMLLoader.load(getClass()....


1

I just made it work in Eclipse. Here is what I did: Create a new project named StickyGridHeaders in Eclipse. Make it a library project and make a package com.tonicartos.widget.stickygridheaders inside it. Do not create any Activity. Create six classes in the package, and give them the same names as the names of classes here. Open each of the classes here ...


1

I suggest posting an issue on the GitHub project https://github.com/OpenNTF/SocialSDK/issues. However, I'm not sure how actively the project is being supported.


1

Declare EditText in class level and then initialize further in onCreate(). this would solve your problem. class Test extends AppCompactActivity{ private EditText sil_key; onCreate(){ ... sil_key = (EditText)findViewById(R.id.silent_key); SharedPreferences sharedPreferences = getSharedPreferences(getString(R.string.preference_file_key),MODE_PRIVATE); ...


1

In your Inflater you need to give your Layout. Also you need to set Tag to convertview. convertView = inflater.inflate(mLayoutId, parent, false); convertView.setTag(viewHolder);


1

Problem in this line: LayoutInflater inflater = (LayoutInflater) mContext.getSystemService(Context.LAYOUT_INFLATER_SERVICE); You have to inflate your xml layout also. convertView = inflater .inflate(R.layout.your_row_layout, parent, false); Your are not specifying the xml layout in getView() method. Your are only instantiating LayoutInflater


1

Your connect is not initialized to a Connection object. you need to assign it with connection object to fix it connect = DriverManager.getConnection("jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521:XE", "SHID","pikachu");


1

You are throwing NullPointerException and your catch block is catching BlewIt so it directly goes to finally block and print Uncaught Exception with a stack trace of NullPointerException. Your catch block will only catch exception of type BlewIt and its sub types. EDIT class BlewIt extends NullPointerException This will make BlewIt a subclass of ...


1

You say that some methods "may return null" but do not say in what circumstances they return null. You say you catch the NullPointerException but you do not say why you catch it. This lack of information suggests you do not have a clear understanding of what exceptions are for and why they are superior to the alternative. Consider a class method that is ...


1

I'd like to add an answer which focus on the meaning of the error. Null exception in itself doesn't provide any meaning full error. So I'd advise to avoid dealing with them directly. There is a thousands cases where your code can go wrong: cannot connect to database, IO Exception, Network error... If you deal with them one by one (like the null check here), ...


1

As others have said, respecting the Law of Demeter is definitely part of the solution. Another part, wherever possible, is to change those chained methods so they cannot return null. You can avoid returning null by instead returning an empty String, an empty Collection, or some other dummy object that means or does whatever the caller would do with null.


1

If you don't want to refactor the code and you can use Java 8, it is possible to use Method references. A simple demo first (excuse the static inner classes) public class JavaApplication14 { static class Baz { private final int _int; public Baz(int value){ _int = value; } public int getInt(){ return _int; } } static ...


1

Don't catch NullPointerException. You don't know where it is coming from (I know it is not probable in your case but maybe something else threw it) and it is slow. You want to access the specified field and for this every other field has to be not null. This is a perfect valid reason to check every field. I would probably check it in one if and then create a ...


1

The most likely cause is that you are trying to call these methods before the skin has been initialized. In this scenario, getSkin() will return null and thus ((SkinBase)getSkin()).getChildren() will throw a null pointer exception. A simple way to avoid this is to do a null check: public void setRippleColor(Color color) { if (getSkin() == null) { ...



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