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18

This new code gets another order of magnitude speedup by taking advantage of the cyclic symmetry of the problem. This Python version enumerates necklaces with Duval's algorithm; the C version uses brute force. Both incorporate the speedups described below. On my machine, the C version solves n = 20 in 100 seconds! A back-of-the-envelope calculation suggests ...


10

When you ask numpy to do: x = x*2 - ( y * 55 ) It is internally translated to something like: tmp1 = y * 55 tmp2 = x * 2 tmp3 = tmp2 - tmp1 x = tmp3 Each of those temps are arrays that have to be allocated, operated on, and then deallocated. Numba, on the other hand, handles things one item at a time, and doesn't have to deal with that overhead.


10

I think this question highlights (somewhat) the limitations of calling out to precompiled functions from a higher level language. Suppose in C++ you write something like: for (int i = 0; i != N; ++i) a[i] = b[i] + c[i] + 2 * d[i]; The compiler sees all this at compile time, the whole expression. It can do a lot of really intelligent things here, including ...


9

The problem is that numba can't intuit the type of lookup. If you put a print nb.typeof(lookup) in your method, you'll see that numba is treating it as an object, which is slow. Normally I would just define the type of lookup in a locals dict, but I was getting a strange error. Instead I just created a little wrapper, so that I could explicitly define the ...


8

Noting that your code has a quadruple-nested set of for loops, I focused on optimizing the inner pair. Here's the old code: for i in xrange(K.shape[0]): for j in xrange(K.shape[1]): print(i,j) '''create an r vector ''' r=(i*distX,j*distY,z) for x in xrange(img.shape[0]): for y in xrange(img.shape[1]): ...


8

The versions I got working at the end were numba-0.17.0 (also 0.18.2) and llvmlite-0.2.2 (also 0.4.0). Here are the relevant dependencies and configuration options on Ubuntu and Fedora. For Ubuntu 14.10 sudo apt-get install zlib1g zlib1g-dev libedit libedit-dev llvm-3.5 llvm-3.5-dev llvm-dev pip install enum34 funcsigs LLVM_CONFIG=/usr/bin/llvm-config-3.5 ...


8

Here's my version of your code which is significantly faster: @jit(nopython=True) def dot(a,b): res = a[0]*b[0]+a[1]*b[1]+a[2]*b[2] return res @jit def compute_stuff2(array_to_compute): N = array_to_compute.shape[0] con_mat = np.zeros((N,N)) p0 = np.zeros(3) p1 = np.zeros(3) q0 = np.zeros(3) q1 = np.zeros(3) p0m1 = ...


7

One very simple speed up of a factor of n is to change this code: def innerproduct(A, B): assert (len(A) == len(B)) for j in xrange(len(A)): s = 0 for k in xrange(0,n): s+=A[k]*B[k] return s to def innerproduct(A, B): assert (len(A) == len(B)) s = 0 for k in xrange(0,n): s+=A[k]*B[k] ...


7

You are basically performing 2D convolution there, with a small modification that your kernel is not reversing as the usual convolution operation does. So, basically, there are two things we need to do here to use signal.convolve2d to solve our case - Slice the input array rho to select a portion of it which is used in the original loopy version of your ...


6

What about using Cython instead? You could convert just this one function to cython syntax, which is than compiled directly to C or so. The syntax should be close enough to python itself, probably just add a few declarations of the right types.


6

No, you cannot run part of a Python program in PyPy and other parts in another Python- It's more than just a JIT, it has a completely different representation of objects and many other internals. If your sole concern is not wanting to make sure the rest of the program works with PyPy, rest assured: Virtually all pure Python code works with PyPy, with the ...


6

How are you doing your timings ? The creation of your random array is taking up the overal part of your calculation, and if you include it in your timing you will hardly see any real difference in the results, however, if you create it up front you can actually compare the methods. Here are my results, and I'm consistently seeing what you are seeing. numpy ...


6

Numba is generally faster than Numpy and even Cython (at least on Linux). Here's a plot (stolen from Numba vs. Cython: Take 2): In this benchmark, pairwise distances have been computed, so this may depend on the algorithm. Note that this may be different on other Platforms, see this for Winpython (From WinPython Cython tutorial):


6

Simply, numba doesn't know how to convert np.arange into a low level native loop, so it defaults to the object layer which is much slower and usually the same speed as pure python. A nice trick is to pass the nopython=True keyword argument to jit to see if it can compile everything without resorting to the object mode: import numpy as np import numba as nb ...


6

You are not taking full advantage of numpy's capabilities. The numpythonic way of handling your problem would be something like: cs = np.zeros((nx+1, nz)) np.cumsum(c*rho, axis=0, out=cs[1:]) aa = cs[5:, 2:-3] - cs[1:-4, 2:-3] bb = cs[4:-1, 2:-3] - cs[:-5, 2:-3] aa will now hold the central, non-zero part of your a array: >>> a[:5, :5] array([[ ...


5

I figured out myself. numba wasn't able to determine the type of the result of np.max(accmap), even if the type of accmap was set to int. This somehow slowed down everything, but the fix is easy: @autojit(locals=dict(reslen=uint)) def sum_accum(accmap, a): reslen = np.max(accmap) + 1 res = np.zeros(reslen, dtype=a.dtype) for i in ...


5

What about using fortran and ctypes? elementwise.F90: subroutine elementwise( a, b, c, M, N ) bind(c, name='elementwise') use iso_c_binding, only: c_float, c_int integer(c_int),intent(in) :: M, N real(c_float), intent(in) :: a(M, N), b(M, N) real(c_float), intent(out):: c(M, N) integer :: i,j forall (i=1:M,j=1:N) c(i,j) = a(i,j) * ...


5

As of the current release of Numba (which you are using in your tests), there is incomplete support for ufuncs with the @jit function. On the other hand you can use @vectorize and it faster: import numpy as np from numba import jit, vectorize import numexpr as ne def numpy_complex_expr(A, B): return(A*B+4.1*A > 2.5*B) def numexpr_complex_expr(A, ...


4

That looks like the LLVM intermediate code. I can't explain the warning at the end, but otherwise, it doesn't look like you should worry about it. I'm not sure what version of numba you're using, but perhaps this old (and now closed) numba issue can help you: apparently running with python -O can suppress that output. If not, you should try and find a ...


4

The problem is you are using vectorize on a function that takes non-scalar arguments. The idea with NumbaPro's vectorize is that it takes a scalar function as input, and generates a function that applies the scalar operation in parallel to all the elements of a vector. See the NumbaPro documentation. Your function takes a matrix and a vector, which are ...


4

Edit: nevermind this answer, I'm wrong (see comment below). I'm afraid it will be very, very hard to have a faster matrix multiplication in python than by using numpy's. NumPy usually uses internal fortran libraries like ATLAS/LAPACK that are very very well optimized. To check if your version of NumPy was built with LAPACK support: open a terminal, go to ...


4

Your code has multiple problems. The B and C vectors are Nx1 2D matrices, not 1D vectors, but the type signature of your kernel lists them as "float32[:]" -- 1D vectors. It also indexes them with a single index, which results in runtime errors on the GPU due to misaligned access (cuda-memcheck is your friend here!) Your kernel assumes a 2D grid, but only ...


4

In [198]: np.float64(1.0).view((np.float32,2)) Out[198]: array([ 0. , 1.875], dtype=float32) So when table[y,x] = 1.0 writes a np.float64(1.0) into table, table views the data as np.float32 and interprets it as a 0 and a 1.875. Notice that the 0 shows up at index location [0,1], and 1.875 shows up at index location [0,2], whereas the assignment ...


4

It most likely means that the version of numba you are using does not support functions with list comprehensions.


4

Numba doesn't make arbitrary method calls faster. If you are calling out to a library, numba really can't do anything with that most of the time. But if you re-write things a little differently, you can still get a decent speedup (I'm using numba 0.14.0 -- if you are using a different version, hardware, etc, you might get different results, especially since ...


4

Aside from the looping and the sheer volume of operations involved, what is most likely killing performance in your case is array allocation. I don't know why your Numba and Cython versions are not living up to your expectation, but you can make your numpy code 2x faster (at the cost of some readability), by doing all operations in-place, i.e. replacing your ...


4

Here is steps to speedup the cython version: cdef np.ndarray doen't make element access faster, you need use memoryview in cython: cdef double[:, ::1] bU = U. Turn off boundscheck and wraparound. Do all the calculations in for-loop. Here is the modified cython code: %%cython #cython: boundscheck=False #cython: wraparound=False cimport cython import ...


4

This is a very broad question. Regarding the benchmark requests, you may be best off running a few small benchmarks yourself matching your own needs. To answer one of the questions: One thing I notice is that Julia is using LLVM v3.3, while Numba uses llvmlite, which is built on LLVM v3.5. Does Julia's old LLVM prevent an optimum SIMD implementation on ...


4

You should use numba dtypes instead of numpy import numba import numpy as np @numba.njit def f(): a = np.zeros(5, dtype=numba.int32) return a In [8]: f() Out[8]: array([0, 0, 0, 0, 0], dtype=int32)


3

@autojit def numbaMax(arr): MAX = arr[0] for i in arr: if i > MAX: MAX = i return MAX @autojit def autonumba_sum_accum2(accmap, a): res = np.zeros(numbaMax(accmap) + 1) for i in xrange(len(accmap)): res[accmap[i]] += a[i] return res 10 loops, best of 3: 26.5 ms per loop <- original 100 loops, best ...



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