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5

That's where formatting culture comes in. You need to get a format specifier that matches your requirements. The default you have is usually the current culture, UI culture or invariant culture. The results you're getting imply you're using the US culture. If you have a specific culture you want to output the number in, use that. If not, you can create your ...


5

I would strongly suggest to perform formatting-related tasks on the client side, for a multitude of reasons. However, starting from SQL Server 2012, you can do this: select MyField, format(MyField, '0.##') as [MyFieldFormatted] from dbo.MyTable;


3

If you give more context we might be able to help you solve your ultimate (rather than proximal) problem, e.g. if you need output in this format but without quotation marks: > cat(sprintf("%04d",5),"\n") 0005 ## or > print(sprintf("%04d",5),quote=FALSE) [1] 0005 write.csv(...,quote=FALSE) might be helpful too


3

If you're willing to use a custom class, you can write a print method that does this. Make a data frame, and give it a custom class: DF <- data.frame(a=letters[1:10], b=sample(c(1, 10, 100), 10, rep=T), c=sample(c(1, 10, 100), 10, rep=T)) class(DF) <- c("my_df", class(DF)) Write a print method that uses @BenBolker's formatting: print.my_df <- ...


3

I would think that using ordinary spaces and then reducing their width with CSS would do the trick. e.g. .currency { word-spacing: -2px } See https://jsfiddle.net/5f9c4cdu/


2

Try using the String.format() method, it will create a string with that number rounded (up or down as appropriate) to two decimal places. String foo = String.format("%.2f", total); result.setText(foo);


2

Use this: {{ "%02d"|format(my.number) }} As per @MarkBaker's comment.


2

All representations of a numerical value depends on culture settings that you used. If you don't use any IFormatProvider, representation will be based on your CurrentCulture settings. The mentioned characters are keeped on any culture as NumberDecimalSeparator and NumberGroupSeparator properties. By the way, replacing your , to . is a bad idea when you ...


2

From the .NET documentation The "#" custom format specifier serves as a digit-placeholder symbol. If the value that is being formatted has a digit in the position where the "#" symbol appears in the format string, that digit is copied to the result string. Otherwise, nothing is stored in that position in the result string. Note that this ...


1

You should write printf('%04.1f', 12.2) because you want your numbers to have at least four characters (including the .) You may want to check out this: http://alvinalexander.com/programming/printf-format-cheat-sheet#printf_-_floating_point_numbers


1

If you want full control create yoru own formatter lik below. See case "U" for your format. public class CustomerFormatter : IFormatProvider, ICustomFormatter { public object GetFormat(Type formatType) { if (formatType == typeof(ICustomFormatter)) return this; else return null; } public string ...


1

Yes, it does. You're missing some points on parsing/formatting here. First, double.Parse method accept IFormatProvider parameter, with this you can instruct the Parser to follow a different a standard/pattern and so do not need to replace "," by "." or any other handling. If you know the source culture do the following: var strValue = "1.000,00"; ////in ...


1

NumberFormat formatter = new DecimalFormat("#0.00"); double decimal = 0.60; System.out.println(formatter.format(decimal));


1

You need to decide what the convention is first. Do you want your commas to separate two digits, or three? Let's imagine that it's 3, as per the usual convention. 1000 should become 1, 000 10000 should become 10,000 100000 should become 100,000 1000000 should become 1,000,000 The code to make that happen can be as trivial as: function ...


1

Depending on your browser targets you could use Number.prototype.toLocaleString() which will format your numbers based on locale which you can specify. Examples are on the linked page below. See https://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Number/toLocaleString For example: var number = 123456.789; ...


1

I don't think this is possible- to manipulate the kerning of a font through css. Your best bet is to find a font with an ideal kerning built in and use that. However, since you need variable kerning, I'd have to recommend using JS. It would be a simple script. html: <div class='currency comma-delimited'>1,000,000.00</div> jQuery code: var ...


1

Try using this code: DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat(); DecimalFormatSymbols dfs = new DecimalFormatSymbols(); dfs.setGroupingSeparator(','); dfs.setDecimalSeparator('.'); df.setDecimalFormatSymbols(dfs); df.setMinimumFractionDigits(2); df.setMaximumFractionDigits(2); result.setText(df.format(n1 / n2)); Hoping it's work. Thanks


1

You can have a scale that goes further than the precision. For example a number(38,40): 0.003344444... Or a number(38,42) (note that 0.003344444 as a value would fail for this type): 0.00003344444... This means that if the precision is less than the scale, the actual number will be digits only.


1

@Karthika PB I think it will remove the 3rd character i.e 12 4567 like it will come. Try this String seq = editText.getText().toString().trim(); String newstring = ""; for (int i = 0; i < seq.length(); i++) { if (i == 2 || i == 6 || i == 10) { newstring = newstring + " " + seq.charAt(i); } else ...


1

You might have to do a little bit of work around. How about this? decimal d = 34561.2223400M; string decimalPart = (d - (int)d).ToString("G29"); string integerPart = d.ToString("##,###"); string finalNumber = integerPart + decimalPart.Substring(1,decimalPart.Length-1);;


1

You have to format the string. Try: string yourString = String.Format("{0:N29}", yourWeight); Edit: The above was pretty close. This gives exactly the desired results: string yourString = String.Format("{0:N29}", yourWeight).Trim(new [] { '0', '.' });


1

I got it. I placed the entire code inside subs_count_ret() function, and it worked fine, plus, I needed this condition: if(empty($num) || $num < 1000) return $num; full code: function subs_count_ret() { $xmlData = file_get_contents( 'http://gdata.youtube.com/feeds/api/users/user' ); $xmlData = str_replace('yt:', 'yt', $xmlData); $xml = ...


1

You simply cannot know enough about the user by using HTML5. It's up to them to tell you, since they could be living outside their country of origin. Once they tell you where they're from, you can use Angular internationalization features to help you format the various things: https://docs.angularjs.org/guide/i18n If you need to dive further into ...


1

You can use DecimalFormat to achieve formatting. DecimalFormat format = new DecimalFormat("##0.00"); System.out.println(format.format(10)); Output : 10.00


1

The decimal number 0007625328 translates to 0x00745A70 in hexadecimal representation. The number 116,23152 is actually a different representation of that same value (0007625328): 116 in decimal is 0x74 in hexadecimal. 23152 in decimal is 0x5A70 in hexadecimal. Combined, this also gives 0x00745A70. So the value that you receive (42 09 01 74 00 74 5A 70) ...


1

You can't perform TryParse on the Sql server, but if you are not doing further selection criteria, then you can try pulling the data from Sql as it is and then parsing on the client. eg myresults = myDataContext.myDbFunction() double note; var list =(from a in myresults select new { a.id, a.nom, a.prenom, a.moyenne, }).ToList(); var ...


1

That's not a valid way to check a binary number. You're converting to an int in base 10, then checking that each of the digits in base 10 is zero or one. The conversion itself will fail on long enough input strings, and if it doesn't the checking will fail as well. You shouldn't be converting it all all, you should be checking the input string itself. EDIT ...



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