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0

Another way, without using a single cast. (For people who are working in JPA2, where no casting is allowed) select col from yourtable order by lenght(col),col


0

defining a function for it: public boolean myCheck(int n) { return (n%4 == 1); } or simply: if (n % 4 == 1) { ... }


2

n % 4 == 1 //gets the remainder which is equal to 1. so here it will print 1 5 9 etc.


6

The operator % can be used to get the remainder of dividing an int by another. So n % 4 is the remainder of dividing n by 4. If this remainder is 1, n is a number you are looking for. Of course you will have to check if n > 0, first. So here is your code: if (n > 0 && n % 4 == 1) { // do stuff } Read the Java Tutorial about arithmetic ...


3

You're referencing tala[tmp] instead of tmp (at line 27) when you're shuffling the array around. That's what's causing the bug. A few pointers: You're using globals for everything. This can cause headaches later on, when globals collide (i.e tmp could be set to something, and you do something with it). See: Local Variables and Blocks Using randomNumber() ...


-1

a = range(0,1000) b = [] for c in a: if c%2==0: b.append(c) print b


0

Thanks to @dbrank0 I could retrieve the gcc version information from the static library. The solution that helped is provided here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/9673793/3868995 While readelf -wi <library> only lists the included files of the library, strings -a <library> |grep "GCC: (" made the job in my case. Thanks!


0

Here's a small class I made for a mutable integer: public class MutableInteger { private int value; public MutableInteger(int value) { this.value = value; } public void set(int value) { this.value = value; } public int intValue() { return value; } } You could easily extend this to any other primitive. Of ...


0

Well, here is a solution I found witout the use of any external library, all I need to do is to define a class that had a property value wich should be a string, and define the function plus function LongNumber() { // it takes the argument and remove first zeros this.value = arguments[0].toString(); while(this.value[0]==="0") ...


3

To work around the precision limitations associated with JavaScript's numbers, you will need to use a BigInteger library like the popular one offered here: http://silentmatt.com/biginteger/ Usage: var a = BigInteger("1548764548675465486"); var b = BigInteger("4535154875433545787"); var c = a.add(b); alert(a.toString() + ' + ' + b.toString() + ' = ' + ...


1

There are no integers in Javascript, all numbers are double precision floating point. That gives you a precision of around 15-16 digits, which is what you are seeing. as per this question and potential solution i.e. use a library Personally, I would not use javascript, never been great at numbers. Just try typing 0.1 + 0.2 into any browsers console ...


1

Let's say you make 3 separate images stored in your drawable folders: upArrow.png, downArrow.png, and car.png (or whatever type of image, your choice). To make them vertically aligned like that, you can place them in a linear layout with a vertical orientation. Since you want the arrows to be clickable, I would make them ImageButtons and use the arrow ...


0

Try using this regular expression: (?<=x)[+-]?0*[0-9]+(?:\.[0-9]+)?|[+-]?0*[0-9]+(?:\.[0-9]+)?(?=h|e) It looks like every number in your testcase you want to match exept the first number is starting with x.This is what the first part of the regex matches. (?<=x)[+-]?0*[0-9]+(?:\.[0-9]+)?The second part of the regex matches the number until h or e. ...


0

If we can assume that the numbers are always going to be four digits long, you can use the regex: (\d{4}\.\d+|\d{4}) DEMO Depending on the language you might need to replace \d with [0-9].


2

I'll try to explain what happens in chunks. First the variable newNum is declared: var newNum; //The value is undefined Then a do-while-loop is used. To keep it short the main benefit of the do-while-loop is that it will always be executed at least ones. You can read about the do-while-loop here. do { //This will run at least ones. newNum = ...


1

The first statement is correct. Because Javascript is a weakly typed language, you can do cross-type comparisons. If an object is not undefined, and you do a boolean comparison on it, it will return true. (the opposite also applies) Since true is not undefined, the second statement is also correct. The reason you get repeated numbers if you turn ...


1

This gets recorded in DW_AT_producer attribute in DWARF debug info. So if you have debug info, try this: objdump -Wi yourlibrary.a|grep "DW_AT_producer" I didn't see any official documentation for this attribute, so you might have to check...


0

Here's simple "sieve" for prime numbers, which can be easily understood, but it is a naive approach. It stores the found prime numbers in the array prim[] and tests by using the modulo function (%): The loop tests against already found prime numbers and exits if it is no prime number, i.e. if the modulo result is 0 (regard the expression i % prim[j])===0), ...


0

If you're looking for max between 1 and 100 you could replace: public static void main(String[] args) { bilgi(27); } with : public static void main(String[] args) { static int maxcountsofar = 0; static int start = 0; static int thisone = 0; for (int iloop = 1; iloop <= 100; iloop++) { thisone = bilgi(iloop); if ...


0

You can use: ^\s*((?:\d+\.\d+)|(?:\d+))(?:\Z|\D) See it work Or, if you only want to match a numeric only if followed by letter or spaces then letters: ^\s*((?:\d+\.\d+)|(?:\d+))(?:\s*[a-zA-Z]) See that one


0

Try this out ([0-9]+(\.[0-9]+)?(\s+)?[a-zA-Z]) Demo


0

public void convert(int s) { System.out.println(NumberFormat.getNumberInstance(Locale.US).format(s)); } public static void main(String args[]) { LocalEx n=new LocalEx(); n.convert(10000); }


0

You could always try binary search to find the number of digits of n: first find a k such that 10^2^k ≥ n, and then divide n succesively by 10^2^(k-1), 10^2^(k-2), ..., 10^2^0: numDigits n = fst $ foldr step (1,n) tenToPow2s where pow2s = iterate (*2) 1 tenToPow2s = zip pow2s . takeWhile (<=n) . iterate (^2) $ 10 step (k,t) (d,n) = if ...


1

Your regex would be, ^\s*\d+(?:\.\d+)?\s*[a-zA-Z]+$ DEMO Explanation: ^ Asserts that we are at the start. \s* Matches Zero or more spaces. \d+ Matches one or more numbers. (?:\.\d+)? Optional one or more number preceded by a dot. \s* Matches Zero or more spaces. [a-zA-Z]+ Matches one or more alphabets. $ End of the line.


1

You didn't convert your image to black and white properly. The values stored in your 512 by 512 matrix are on the scale of 0 to 255. To reduce it to the black and white scale used by the edge() function simply divide by 255. % Load data file load('lenna512.mat') % Scale to proper intensity range for the type double (0 to 1) lenna512_bw = lenna512/255; % ...


8

Because 1125899906842600 > 2147483647. 2147483647 is the maximum value for a 32-bit signed integer.


8

If PHP encounter an overflow, it will cast to float. See http://php.net/manual/en/language.types.integer.php


2

If you just want to find the first number with at least digitCount digits in a list, you could test each number in O(1) by checking if fibBeingTested >= 10digitCount - 1. This works since 10digitCount - 1 is the lowest number with at least digitCount digits: import Data.List (find) fibs :: [Integer] -- ... findFib :: Int -> Integer findFib digitCount = ...


0

For just getting up to a Fibonacci number that has more than 1000 digits, length . show (on Integer) suffices. GHCi> let fibs = Data.Function.fix $ (0:) . scanl (+) 1 GHCi> let digits = length . (show :: Integer -> String) GHCi> :set +t +s GHCi> fst . head . dropWhile ((1000>) . digits . snd) $ zip [0..] fibs 4782 it :: Integer (0.10 secs, ...


6

Why not use div until it's no longer greater than 10? digitCount :: Integer -> Int digitCount = go 1 . abs where go ds n = if n >= 10 then go (ds + 1) (n `div` 10) else ds This is O(n) complexity, where n is the number of digits, and you could speed it up easily by checking against 1000, then 100, then 10, but this will probably be ...


0

You can still use Collections.shuffle() initially. As you continue playing music, keep track at what index the current song is at. So lets say you've played 7 songs and are currently on the 8th. Then curr=7 When you want to delete a song, find the song in the list and remove it. If you want to insert a song, randomly generate a numbers between curr + 1 and ...


0

In general putting ' sign in cell before the number could enforce Excel to use the value as text. If you could manipulate the original xls or ask user to do it before saving to csv it would work {e.g. having a new column in and putting onto B1 cell =CONCATENATE("'",A1) } "Figuring out" from csv+php won't work (precision lost already).


0

usedNums is an array that tracks which values have already been seen/used. The do-while loop will repeatedly generate a newNum until it comes up with one which hasn't been seen. Since you will now use this previously unseen value, usedNums[newNum] = true records the fact that it has now become part of the usedNum set.


0

Lets assume this is in a dataframe named 'dat'. I'm guessing your are using 'attach' and I would advise you to drop that misguided approach, since it will trip you up more often than not and the saved time in typing will be wasted by the confusion it creates. Instead it would be quite easy to modify the code the you are using: dat$TravelDate <- as.Date( ...


0

If you have numerals 0 thru 9 on A1, in B1 enter: =CHOOSE(A1+1,"zero","one","two","three","four","five","six","seven","eight","nine") This formula is only good for single numbers.


1

Assign DateOut to Travel.date and then for components of DateOut which are NA replace them with DateIn using replace: DF2 <- transform(DF, Travel.date = DateOut) isna <- is.na(DF2$DateOut) transform(DF2, Travel.date = replace(Travel.date, isna, DateIn[isna])) We have assumed this test data: DF <- structure(list(DateIn = structure(c(14937, 15329, ...


1

If dat is the dataset. I assume it is is.na(DateOut) from the Travel date column as.Date(with(dat, ifelse(is.na(DateOut), DateIn, DateOut)),origin="1970-01-01") #[1] "2010-11-24" "2012-01-21" "2010-11-25" "2014-01-14" Or you can do: dat$Travel.date <- dat$DateOut dat$Travel.date[is.na(dat$Travel.date)] <- dat$DateIn[is.na(dat$Travel.date)] ...


0

Yeah i later did something like this that worked out perfectly well for me <?php $no2 = array('01','02','03','04','05','06','07','08','09','10', '11', '12', '13', '14', '15', '16', '17', '18', '19', '20', '21', '22', '23', '24', '25', '26', '27', '28', '29', '30', '31', '32', '33', '34', '35', '36', '37', '38', '39', '40', '41', '42', '43', '44', ...


0

You can use map: lines = ['4 11', '8 4', '10 5', '15 8', '4 3'] a,b = map(int,lines[0].split()) print a,b 4 11 a, b, c, d = map(int,lines[0].split() + lines[2].split()) print a,b,c,d 4 11 10 5


2

In [13]: lines = ['4 11', '8 4', '10 5', '15 8', '4 3'] In [14]: [[int(i) for i in line.split()] for line in lines] Out[14]: [[4, 11], [8, 4], [10, 5], [15, 8], [4, 3]] Now, you can iterate over the new list and assign whatever variables you'd like EDIT: If you want to read each pair of numbers only once, you could turn the list comprehension into a ...


1

Instead of assuming which characters the numbers will be, you should use split(). for num_pair in lines: a, b = lines.split() # Splits based on whitespace # Do something with a and b split() separates a string into a list of smaller strings, splitting based on whitespace (or, if you pass in a character as an argument, splits on that character).


0

Try the following, see if removing the [0] works <?php echo '$' . number_format($_POST["input_price"], 2, '.', ','); ?>


3

Here's what the standard has to say about it in §2.14.4 [lex.fcon]/1 (emphasis mine): A floating literal consists of an integer part, a decimal point, a fraction part, an e or E, an optionally signed integer exponent, and an optional type suffix. The integer and fraction parts both consist of a sequence of decimal (base ten) digits. Either the integer ...


1

This method doesn't use recursion with O(log(n)) complexity. Check this out. #define ull unsigned long long #define MODULO 1000000007 ull PowMod(ull n) { ull ret = 1; ull a = 2; while (n > 0) { if (n & 1) ret = ret * a % MODULO; a = a * a % MODULO; n >>= 1; } return ret; } And this is pseudo from ...


0

I don't know if I understand you well if I didn't please forgive me to make it : in ActionListenerclass write this: float s = (float) Double.parseDouble(theTextField.getText()); int counter = 0; counter++; theTextField.setText("" + counter);


0

You might want to use a function like this: public static int getRandInt(int max, int min) { return new Random().nextInt((max - min) + 1) + min; }


3

Rather than worry about generating the numbers in a random order, you should adjust your approach to shuffling the numbers. You know you will have the numbers 1-9 so do something like this: public ArrayList<Integer> getRandomOrderedNums(){ ArrayList<Integer> numbers = new ArrayList<Integer>(); for(Integer i = 1; i < 10; ...


0

For your second part, to see if the numbers are repeated, you can easily use a data structure such as a HashSet, which is the most efficient to check for repeated values. Let me know if you're not fully comfortable with them. Using the hashset, you can come up with a random number, and check if the set contains this number, and if it does, try again. With ...


0

You can use the method 'parse' of the NumberFormat class try { Log.i("TAG",((Number)NumberFormat.getInstance().parse("123efdsf4")).intValue()+""); } catch (ParseException e) { // TODO Auto-generated catch block e.printStackTrace(); } This method will parse the String until it finds a char.


0

a trivial approach without regex: private int readNum(String input){ String buffer = ""; char[] chars = input.toCharArray(); for(char c: chars){ if(Character.isDigit(c)) buffer = buffer + c; else break; } return Integer.parseInt(buffer); }



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