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5

There is no built-in function. You could write one CREATE FUNCTION is_numeric( p_str IN VARCHAR2 ) RETURN NUMBER IS l_num NUMBER; BEGIN l_num := to_number( p_str ); RETURN 1; EXCEPTION WHEN value_error THEN RETURN 0; END; and/or CREATE FUNCTION my_to_number( p_str IN VARCHAR2 ) RETURN NUMBER IS l_num NUMBER; BEGIN l_num := ...


4

It's a Greek letter used in mathematics to denote a set of consecutive numbers. Iota use in APL.


4

Quoting this non-authoritative, but nonetheless correct, wiki: The function is named after the integer function ⍳ from the programming language APL. In APL, the ⍳ function (represented with the character for the Greek letter iota) is used to create a zero-based array of consecutive, ascending integers of a specified length.


3

You can use the Rmpfr package: tmp <- c("11240690100051000001", "11240690100051000002", "11240690100051000003", "11240690100051000004") library("Rmpfr") as.bigz(tmp) ## Big Integer ('bigz') object of length 4: ## [1] 11240690100051000001 11240690100051000002 11240690100051000003 ## [4] 11240690100051000004 ... but this may limit severely what you ...


2

If I understand correctly you want the distance between $low and $high to be equally distributed between four values. I think the algorithm is pretty self explanatory in the code below... <?php $low = 0; //substitute user entry $high = 100; //substitute user entry $difference = $high - $low; $increment = $difference/5; //we use 5 because we need four ...


2

First, here's why you would have to convert to character before converting to numeric: Lets say we have a factor that contains a handful of numbers x = factor(c(1,2,7,7)) you can inspect how this is represented in R like so: unclass(x) #> [1] 1 2 3 3 #> attr(,"levels") #> [1] "1" "2" "7" and you would see that there are 3 levels, and that ...


2

Let me try to summarize the existing answers, with comments on each below: (a) If you indeed need to use bc for arbitrary-precision calculations - as the OP does - use the OP's own clever approach, which textually reformats the scientific notation to an equivalent expression that bc understands. If potentially losing precision is not a concern, (b) ...


1

You can use the following regular expression which will match integers (e.g., 123), floating-point numbers (12.3), and numbers with exponents (1.2e3): ^-?\d*\.?\d+([eE]-?\d+)?$ If you want to accept + signs as well as - signs (as Oracle does with TO_NUMBER()), you can change each occurrence of - above to [+-]. So you might rewrite your block of code above ...


1

You could use a regular expression to check that the String is only digits. Something like private static boolean isNumber(String score) { return score.matches("^\\d+$"); } which tests that the String begins and ends with digits. Alternatively, you could write the same function by testing that a String contains a non-digit with the \D pattern like ...


1

Google have already made significant advancements to reCAPTCHA technology. However, numeric only CAPTCHA is not possible yet. The updated system uses advanced risk analysis techniques, actively considering the user’s entire engagement with the CAPTCHA—before, during and after they interact with it. That means that today the distorted letters serve less as a ...


1

Floating point data types (of which REAL is a member) are approximate values, and can use any of a number of algorithms to encode the sequence of number, causing minute differences in how they're interpreted in SQL. This is the reason you can have a single float(10) value of 1234567890 and .1234567890 select cast(1234567890 as float(10)) select ...


1

This page has a very plausible-seeming explanation: The Greek letter iota is used in the programming language APL to generate a sequence of consecutive integers.


1

After reading your updates, maybe range is enough for your needs: $low = 0; $high = 100; $steps = 5; $value = range($low, $high, ($high-$low)/$steps); print_r($value); Array ( [0] => 0 1 => 20 2 => 40 [3] => 60 [4] => 80 [5] => 100 ) See test at eval.in (link expires soon)


1

One possibility, probably the simplest: print the digits one by one and use print <value>, (note the comma) to avoid a line break after each print. At the end, a print without parameters will produce just a line break. This way, you don't even have to build up a sequence. For when print is a function, the syntax is print(<value>,end='') and ...



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