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5

I think this answer is pretty straightforward: f <- c(1,3,6,8,10,12,19,27) x <- 18 # find the value that is closest to x maxless <- max(f[f <= x]) # find out which value that is which(f == maxless)


4

You only need the 8 first characters then : Insert into TEMP_SDR_RECEIVED(ID_DATE) Select to_date(substr(ID, 1, 8), 'YYYYMMDD') FROM TEMP_SDR_RECEIVED See SQLFiddle. By default, the hours / min / seconds will be set to 0


4

If your vector f is always sorted, then you can do sum(f <= x) f <- c(1,3,6,8,10,12,19,27) x <- 18 sum(f <= x) # [1] 6 x <- 19 sum(f <= x) # [1] 7


3

Try this (not a perfect solution) x<-c(1,3,6,8,10,12,19,27) showIndex<-function(x,input){ abs.diff<-abs(x-input) index.value<-unique(ifelse(abs.diff==0,which.min(abs.diff),which.min(abs.diff)-1)) return(index.value) } showIndex(x,12) [1] 6 showIndex(x,19) [1] 7


3

$ paste -d';' <(cut -d';' -f1,2 file) <( cut -d';' -f3,4 file | sort -t';' -n -k2) b; 1 ; b; 1 a; 5 ; g; 2 g; 2 ; a; 5 How it works This selects the first two columns from the input file: $ cut -d';' -f1,2 file b; 1 a; 5 g; 2 This selects the second two columns from the input file and then sorts them numerically on the last column: $ cut -d';' ...


3

In case of Oracle/PostgreSQL the corresponding type to NUMBER/NUMERIC is Java's BigDecimal. The both types have the same internal representation (number stored as decimal digits). So you do not face any problems with rounding errors and also casting between them should be faster. It is big misunderstanding that many Java developers use Int(s)/Long(s) for ...


2

You could try: x <- 18 f <- c(1,3,6,8,10,12,19,27) ifelse(x %in% f, which(f %in% x), which.min(abs(f - x)) - 1) That way if x is not in f, it will return the nearest previous index. If x is in f, it will return x index.


2

Another one: which.min(abs(18 - replace(f, f>18, Inf))) #[1] 6 f[which.min(abs(18 - replace(f, f>18, Inf)))] #[1] 12 Or as a function: minsmaller <- function(x,value) which.min(abs(value - replace(x, x>value, Inf))) minsmaller(f, 18) #[1] 6 minsmaller(f, 19) #[1] 7


1

There's no built in function that I know of. A regular expression can catch it pretty easy, ^\d+(\.\d*)?$ (will match '0.123', but not '.123'). But here's another alternative strategy. <?php function isDigit($var) { return ((string)$var == (float)$var); } var_export(isDigit('123.3')); // true var_export(isDigit('-321')); // true ...


1

%0 through %9 are reserved for use in batch files by the Windows command processor. They represent parameters received via the command line. This means that variables cannot start with a number. You can test this with a simple batch file: ::foo.bat @echo %0 %1 %2 Call it like: C:\Test>foo Param1 Param2 Output: C:\Test>foo Param1 Param2 ...


1

You can create and use environment variables with names that begin with a digit, but it is not a good idea, and should be avoided. Defining the variable is no problem. But expansion using normal percent expansion is a problem. The problem is the batch parser sees the inital %1 in %1word% and expands the first argument instead of the variable. Even if no ...


1

You could store a map from an array of the arguments to the result in your functor: class MyFun { public: virtual double eval(double x, double y, double z) const { std::array<double,3> arr {x,y,z}; //is the answer cached? if (cache_.count(arr)) { return cache_[arr]; } double ret ...


1

I would implement a new Expression::Virtual subclass that will do only caching, while keeping an instance of another expression to delegate actual calculations to it: class CachedExpression: public Expression::Virtual { private: // for simplicity I assume a separate Point class mutable std::map<Point, double> cache_; const ...


1

What are approaches that isolate the caching logic from the rest of the code? You could separate the cache into another class with the same interface, which can cache the results of any expression: class Cache : public Virtual { public: explicit Cache(Virtual const & target) : target(target) {} double eval(double x, double y, double z) ...


1

The reason is that for the purpose of the equality comparison, the type with the higher resolution is cast to the type of the lower resolution. I.e.: in the example the numeric is cast to double precision. Demo: SELECT * , num = dp AS no_cast , num::float8 = dp AS dp_cast , num = dp::numeric AS num_cast FROM ( SELECT numeric ...



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