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7

For single numbers, isapprox is defined. If you want to extend this to an element-wise comparison on Arrays, you could use: all(x -> isapprox(x...), zip(A, B)) all(x -> isapprox(x...), zip(A, A + 1e-5)) # => false all(x -> isapprox(x...), zip(A, A + 1e-6)) # => true


6

There is no function called allclose that ships with Julia: julia> allclose ERROR: allclose not defined I don't know whether an existing Julia function provides the functionality you want but, based on the numpy.allclose documentation, you can implement one yourself (complete with keyword arguments): function allclose(a, b; rtol = 1e-5, atol = 1e-8) ...


6

Your 2D array could be produced using the following addition: np.arange(200)[:,np.newaxis] + np.arange(200) This type of vectorised operation is likely to be very fast: >>> %timeit np.arange(200)[:,np.newaxis] + np.arange(200) 1000 loops, best of 3: 178 µs per loop This method in not limited to addition. We can use the two arrays in the ...


5

Going only once through the arrays might be faster, even it uses pure python: from collections import defaultdict from itertools import izip add = lambda (sum_, count), value: (sum_+value, count+1) unique = defaultdict(lambda:(0,0)) for ref, value in izip(reference_array.flat, given_array.flat): unique[ref] = add(unique[ref], float(value)) with ...


5

This is a case of (advanced) partial indexing. There are 2 indexed arrays, and 1 slice If the indexing subspaces are separated (by slice objects), then the broadcasted indexing space is first, followed by the sliced subspace of x. http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy-1.8.1/reference/arrays.indexing.html#advanced-indexing The advanced indexing example ...


5

The trouble is that zs = np.array(range(80262,80268)) creates an array of int32 values. np.square(zs) returns an array of the same datatype as zs and the final squared value in the array overflows the four bytes of memory it's been allocated. You see that Ns = -np.square(zs) + 2*zs*R+ 3*R**2 has a datatype of int64 because NumPy has given this array more ...


4

In [54]: dog=[[1,2],[4,3],[6,7]] In [55]: np.min(dog, axis=1) Out[55]: array([1, 3, 6]) or, if dog is a NumPy array, you could call its min method: In [57]: dog = np.array([[1,2],[4,3],[6,7]]) In [58]: dog.min(axis=1) Out[58]: array([1, 3, 6]) Since dog.shape is (3,2), (for 3 rows, 2 columns), the axis=1 refers to the second dimension in the shape -- ...


4

How about (docs): >>> df.combine_first(df.T) a b c d a 1.0 0.5 0.6 0.5 b 0.5 1.0 0.0 0.4 c 0.6 0.0 1.0 0.3 d 0.5 0.4 0.3 1.0


4

According to WinPython creator : There is no decent open-source (free) Fortran compiler for the Windows 64bit platform. As a consequence, it's impossible to build NumPy on this platform using only free and open-source tools. That's why there is no official Windows 64bit binaries for this library . The only ready-to-use installers available out there ...


4

You can get the whole thing to work in numpy using unique and bincount. Since numpy's unique uses sorting, it is going to have linearithmic complexity, but it typically beats pure Python code using dictionaries, despite the linear complexity. If you are using numpy 1.9 or newer: >>> unq, inv, cnts = np.unique(reference_array, return_inverse=True, ...


4

>>> a = np.array([1,2,3,4,5]) >>> b = np.array([1,2,3]) >>> b.resize(a.shape) >>> a * b array([1, 4, 9, 0, 0])


4

You could use the indices routine: b=np.indices(a.shape) a=b[0]+b[1] Timings: %%timeit ...: b=np.indices(a.shape) ...: c=b[0]+b[1] 1000 loops, best of 3: 370 µs per loop %%timeit for i in range(200): for j in range(200): a[i,j] = i + j 100 loops, best of 3: 10.4 ms per loop


4

You can wrap the dict with pandas.Series and then simply create it as a column: In [633]: A['D'] = pd.Series(B) In [634]: A Out[634]: A B C D 1a 1 5 2 0.500 2a 2 4 4 0.750 3a 3 3 1 0.625 4a 4 2 2 0.550 5a 5 1 4 1.000


3

Your dtype isn't fine. It's specifying '<f8', a float, for each of the fields. You want strings. Try dtype=None: np.genfromtxt(txt,delimiter=',',names=True,dtype=None) which produces: array([ ('Strings strings', 'Error', '") Thread Name: Extended Properties:"', 'SunDSrvc.exe', 'C:\\Program Files\\SunDSrvc.exe', '5DAA9377 ', 'Client'), ...


3

If df1.index has no duplicate values, then you could use df1.join: In [283]: df1 = pd.DataFrame(np.random.normal(size=8).reshape(4,2),index=[1,2,3,4],columns=['a','b']) In [284]: df2 = pd.DataFrame(np.random.normal(size=8).reshape(2,4),index=['c','d'],columns=[5,6,7,8]) In [285]: df1.join(df2.T.set_index(df1.index)) Out[285]: a b ...


3

Here is one alternative way: >>> m[np.triu_indices_from(m, k=1)] = m.T[np.triu_indices_from(m, k=1)] >>> m array([[ 1. , 0.5, 0.6, 0.5], [ 0.5, 1. , 0. , 0.4], [ 0.6, 0. , 1. , 0.3], [ 0.5, 0.4, 0.3, 1. ]]) m[np.triu_indices_from(m, k=1)] returns the values above the diagonal of m and assigns them to the ...


3

You're right, that's weird. I can only hazard a guess here. I think it's related to the fact that a[[0,1],[0,1],[0,1]].shape is (2,) rather than (2,2,2) and that a[0,1,[0,1,2]] really means a[[0,0,0],[1,1,1],[0,1,2]] which evaluates to array([a[0,1,0],a[0,1,1],a[0,1,2]]). That is, you step through lists-as-indices for each dimension in parallel, with ...


3

This is a really good example of how the range of variable types in Python and numpy can be confusing for a beginner. What's happening is [3,1,4,8,2,1,0] returns a list, not an ndarray. So, the expression ar == 8 returns a scalar False, because all comparisons between list and scalar types return False. Thus, np.where(False) returns an empty array. The ...


3

The translation (in this case) is almost one-for-one: index1 = ((A == 2) & (B > C)) index2 = ((A == 2) & (B >= D) & (B <= C)) res = np.zeros((100, 100), dtype='uint8') res[index1] = 5 res[index2] = 4 Alternatively, you could define res as res = np.where(A == 2, np.where(B > C, 5, np.where(B >= D, 4, 0)), 0) though I don't ...


3

I don't have a numpy install handy, but this is the approach that I would take. First handle the case of an empty array separately. Sort the array if it isn't already sorted and use np.diff to compute the differences. 0, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 20, 21, 22, 70 3 1 3 1 1 1 10 1 1 48 Test the differences for being > 1. 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 ...


3

import numpy as np n, k = 30, 40 U = np.random.random((n, n, k)) K = np.random.random((n, n, n)) def using_loops(U, K): S = np.empty((n, n, n)) for i in xrange(n): temp = np.zeros((n, n)) for j in xrange (n): if j != i: temp += np.dot(U[j], U[j].T) S[i] = np.dot(temp, K[i]) return S def ...


3

You can use the builtin type function to check the type of a variable. import numpy as np np.random.seed(0) n = 10000 x = np.random.standard_normal(n) print(type(x)) # numpy.ndarray If, in the specific case of numpy, you want to check the type of your elements, then you can do print(x.dtype) # dtype('float64')


3

IIUC, can't you take advantage of broadcasting on the range? Maybe something like In [32]: x[np.arange(len(x))[:,None], col_ix] Out[32]: array([[ 0, 1, 2], [ 6, 7, 8], [10, 12, 14], [18, 19, 17]])


3

Changes the floats to time_deltas (which are able to handle NaNs) In [22]: df Out[22]: dates floats ints 0 2007-07-13 NaN 1 1 2006-01-13 2 2 2 2010-08-13 3 3 In [23]: df.dates - pd.to_timedelta(df.floats.astype(str), unit='D') Out[23]: 0 NaT 1 2006-01-11 2 2010-08-10 dtype: datetime64[ns]


2

Use broadcasting (see e.g. here http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/user/basics.broadcasting.html). In your case, changing the function to def fh(x,sign=1.0): x1 = x[0] # changed x2 = x[1] # changed out = (np.sin(x1 - x2/8)**2 + np.sin(x2 + x1/8)**2)/(np.sqrt((x1 - 8.6998)**2 + (x2 - 6.7665)**2) + 1) return out will work for inputs of shape ...


2

You can unpack the transpose of the array in order to use the columns for your function arguments: my_func(*arr.T) Here's a simple example: >>> x = np.arange(15).reshape(5, 3) array([[ 0, 5, 10], [ 1, 6, 11], [ 2, 7, 12], [ 3, 8, 13], [ 4, 9, 14]]) Let's write a function to add the columns together (normally ...


2

How about A.sort() A[:,::-1] ? References : http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.ndarray.sort.html http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/arrays.indexing.html


2

I just downloaded Pypy 2.4 and its numpy (via the git install). Looks like the ufunc functionality has a bug or is just incomplete. x = numpy.arange(10) x.sum() # 45 x.min() # 0 numpy.min(x) # TypeError: expected integer, got NoneType object numpy.sum(x) # same error but if I give it an out attribute these ufunc versions work (sortof) numpy.sum(x, ...


2

You can do something like this: >>> my_matrix.mean(axis=1)[:,np.newaxis] array([[ 0.33333333], [ 0.66666667], [ 1.66666667], [ 1. ]])


2

You can create the 3x3 matrix easily using Pandas. Create a DataFrame df from the above array and pivot on the third column using pivot_table. For example if you have the following dictionary d of lists: {'Fac1': ['a', 'b', 'c', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'a', 'b', 'c'], 'Fac2': ['a', 'a', 'a', 'b', 'b', 'b', 'c', 'c', 'c'], 'VarCovar': [1.4, 0.7, 0.3, 0.7, 1.8, ...



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