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8

You're confusing RandomState with seed. Your first line constructs an object which you can then use as your random source. For example, we make >>> rnd = np.random.RandomState(3) >>> rnd <mtrand.RandomState object at 0xb17e18cc> and then >>> rnd.choice(range(20), (5,)) array([10, 3, 8, 0, 19]) >>> ...


5

-inf means negative infinity. It is "smaller" than all other values in that it is less than them. Adding negative infinity to any finite number still gives negative infinity.


5

Two of the reasons why a[100][100] (getting from the list) is quicker than b[100,100] (getting from the array) are that: The bytecode opcode BINARY_SUBSCR is executed when indexing both lists and arrays, but it is optimised for Python lists. Integer indexing for Python lists is very simple and the code is very lean. NumPy indexing is much more complicated ...


5

I think you should use RandomState class as follows: In [21]: r=np.random.RandomState(3) In [22]: r.choice(range(20),(5,)) Out[22]: array([10, 3, 8, 0, 19]) In [23]: r.choice(range(20),(5,)) Out[23]: array([10, 11, 9, 10, 6]) In [24]: r=np.random.RandomState(3) In [25]: r.choice(range(20),(5,)) Out[25]: array([10, 3, 8, 0, 19]) In [26]: ...


5

Use the argmax function, in combination with unravel_index to get the row and column indices: >>> import numpy as np >>> a = np.random.rand(96,96) >>> rowind, colind = np.unravel_index(a.argmax(), a.shape) As far as plotting goes, if you just want to pinpoint the maximum value using a Boolean mask, this is the way to go: ...


5

It looks like the test function you're using is memory bound. That means that the run time you're seeing is limited by how fast the computer can pull the arrays from memory into cache. For example, the line a = a + b is actually using 3 arrays, a, b and a new array that will replace a. These three arrays are about 8MB each (1e6 floats * 8 bytes per floats). ...


4

With A[A>B] you get a list of all elements of A which are larger than the corresponding elements of B. Use instead >>> idx1 = A[:,0]<B[:,0] >>> idx2 = A[:,1]>B[:,1] >>> idx = np.column_stack((idx1,idx2)) >>> np.where(idx,A,B) array([[ 310., 460.], [-4022., 4013.], [ -297., 145.], [ ...


4

solution from itertools import groupby from operator import itemgetter arr = [[6.0, 12.0, 1.0], [7.0, 9.0, 1.0], [8.0, 7.0, 1.0], [4.0, 3.0, 2.0], [6.0, 1.0, 2.0], [2.0, 5.0, 2.0], [9.0, 4.0, 3.0], [2.0, 1.0, 4.0], [8.0, 4.0, 4.0], [3.0, 5.0, 4.0]] result = [] for groupByID, rows in ...


4

-inf is the smallest number but what that means is that it's the negative number with the largest magnitude. It doesn't mean it's the closest you can get to zero without actually being zero: <---------------------------|--------------------------> -inf 0 10 +inf When you add a massive negative number to 10, ...


4

A = np.array([[0,1,2], [3,4,5], [5,4,1]]) medians=np.median(A,axis=1)[np.newaxis].T A[A<medians]=0 A= [[0 1 2] [3 4 5] [5 4 1]] Medians= [[ 1.] [ 4.] [ 4.]] A after subtracting medians [[0 1 2] [0 4 5] [5 4 0]]


3

The * operator depends on the data type. On Numpy arrays it does an element-wise multiplication (not the matrix multiplication); numpy.vdot() does the "dot" scalar product of two vectors (which returns a simple scalar result) >>> import numpy as np >>> x = np.array([[1,2,3]]) >>> np.vdot(x, x) 14 >>> x * x array([[1, 4, ...


3

First note that without the offset some localtimes and therefore their datetime strings are ambiguous. For example, the ISO 8601 datetime strings 2000-10-29T01:00:00-07:00 2000-10-29T01:00:00-08:00 both map to the same string 2000-10-29T01:00:00 when the offset is removed. So it may not always be possible to reconstitute a unique timezone-aware datetime ...


3

You can take a weighted dot product of successive columns to get a one-dimensional signal that is much easier to work with. You might be able to extract the patterns using this signal: import numpy as np A = np.loadtxt("img.txt") N = A.shape[0] L = np.logspace(1,2,N) X = [] for c0,c1 in zip(A.T, A.T[1:]): x = c0.dot(c1*L) / ...


3

You can do: for x in sorted(np.unique(arr[...,2])): results.append([np.average(arr[np.where(arr[...,2]==x)][...,0]), np.average(arr[np.where(arr[...,2]==x)][...,1]), x]) Testing: >>> arr array([[ 6., 12., 1.], [ 7., 9., 1.], [ 8., 7., 1.], [ 4., 3., 2.], ...


3

You just need to specify the axis across which you want to take the minimum. To find the minimum value in each row, you need to specify axis 1: >>> numbers.min(axis=1) array([ 0, 4, 8, 12, 16]) For a 2D array, numbers.min() finds the single minimum value in the array, numbers.min(axis=0) returns the minimum value for each column and ...


3

An un-vectorized linear approach will be to use a dictionary here: dct = dict(keys) # new array is required if dtype is different or it it cannot be casted new_array = np.empty(data.shape, dtype=str) for index in np.arange(data.size): index = np.unravel_index(index, data.shape) new_array[index] = dct[data[index]]


3

You can use pointers in Matlab to point to the same matrix without making a copy. Here's a simple example based on code from Using pointers in Matlab First you define a class that inherits from the handle class, which is Matlab's pointer class. The class properties will store your matrix. classdef HandleObject < handle properties Object=[]; % ...


3

You must pass the self too, either return np.ndarray.__getitem__(self, key) or return super(imarray, self).__getitem__(key)


3

The simplest way I can think of is this: just find an average of the coordinates of mass components weighted by each component's contribution. import numpy masses = numpy.array([[0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 1, 0, 0], [0, 2, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0, 0], [1, 1, 0, 1], [1, 2, 0, 1], [2, 0, 0, 0], [2, 1, 0, 0], [2, 2, 0, 0]]) nonZeroMasses = ...


3

One easy thing that should bump efficiency up should be to do in-place array operations, if possible -- so add(a,b,a) will not create a new array, while a = a + b will. If your for loop over numpy arrays could be rewritten as vector operations, that should be more efficient as well. Another possibility would be to use numpy.ctypeslib to enable shared memory ...


2

Ignoring ali_m's perfectly valid comment about whether you've actually measured your performance issues... http://docs.cython.org/src/userguide/fusedtypes.html#selecting-specializations "For a cdef or cpdef function called from Cython this means that the specialization is figured out at compile time. For def functions the arguments are typechecked at ...


2

Scikit-learn doesn't support masked arrays. Computing the RBF kernel is really simple if you can compute euclidean distances, though.


2

Sure! What you want is blitting. If you weren't writing a gui, you could simplify some of this by using matplotlib.animation, but you'll need to handle it directly if you want things to be interactive. In matplotlib terms, you want a combination of fig.canvas.copy_from_bbox, and then alternately call fig.canvas.restore_region(background), ...


2

The Python interpreter translates * to a call to __mul__ (or one of its variants). And in the case of 3 * obj, it will use the method of the obj. Building on your comment that asdf contains strings: In [205]: A=np.array(['A','B','C']) In [206]: B=np.array([1,2,3]) In [207]: B.__mul__(3) Out[207]: array([3, 6, 9]) In [208]: A.__mul__(3) Out[208]: ...


2

The error is from if a > 0, as the error says the truth value of a, which will be a NumPy array is ambiguous. NumPy ValueError: The truth value of an array with more than one element is ambiguous. Use a.any() or a.all() ValueError: The truth value of an array with more than one element is ambiguous. Use a.any() or a.all() NumPy ValueError: The truth ...


2

A) you probably won't get any benfit unless you can define the dimensions and interntal datatype of your numpy arrays def explicit_cython(np.ndarray[np.float_t,ndim=2],... B) I think the deprecrated warning is saying the new better interface is typed memory views http://docs.cython.org/src/userguide/memoryviews.html. If you don't want to uss those then ...


2

Assume you have a dictionary of value:kwargs pairs, where value is the value that X must take to be in that curve and kwargs is a dict that holds arguments to be passed to the plotting function. The code below will use the value to construct a mask which can be used to index and choose the appropriate points. import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as ...


2

Its because you set unpack=True, unpack transposes your array. From the numpy documentation: unpack : bool, optional If True, the returned array is transposed, so that arguments may be unpacked using x, y, z = loadtxt(...). When used with a record data-type, arrays are returned for each field. Default is False.` If you set it to false, it wont ...


2

You can slice r_div to get the first 110 values before you divide: ym / r_div[:110] The / operator does division element-wise on NumPy arrays.


2

Your append line is passing a single param of a tuple rather than 2 arrays: arr = np.append((arr, np.array(FeatureFolds[x][y]))) #^- extraneous ( another one here -^ should be arr = np.append(arr, np.array(FeatureFolds[x][y]))



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