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0

For the determinant of the 2 matrices, you have that det(A) * det(A^{-1}) = 1 so that if det(A) is big, then det(A^{-1}) is small. For the norm of the 2 matrices, (if you pick a sub-multiplicative norm), you have: 1 = |A*A^{-1}| >= |A| |A^-1| where || is a reasonable choice of a norm that is sub-multiplicative. Here you have the intuition of what ...


0

There aren't existing functions for this, but it's not too bad to write your own: def remove_zero_rows(M): M = scipy.sparse.csr_matrix(M) First, convert the matrix to CSR (compressed sparse row) format. This is important because CSR matrices store their data as a triple of (data, indices, indptr), where data holds the nonzero values, indices stores ...


1

Essentially you are comparing two very different things. On one side you have np.tensordot, which consists in reshaping/broadcasting the input arrays and then calling np.dot for the matrix multiplication. This later operation is performed by a BLAS library (MKL, OpenBLAS, BLAS Atlas, etc), and can be indeed multi threaded depending on the specific ...


1

I find that tensordot outperforms einsum by a lot for some operations. Consider the following: For the array operation: 50x1000x1000 X 50x1000x1000 -> 50x50 Using tensordot gives me 6 GFLOPS compared to 0.2 GFLOPS with einsum. I think an important point is that Modern machines should be able to get in the 5-50 GFLOP range for large arrays. If you ...


6

pd.Series have a clip method (defined in pandas/core/generic.py). def clip(self, lower=None, upper=None, out=None, axis=None): ... result = self if lower is not None: result = result.clip_lower(lower, axis) if upper is not None: result = result.clip_upper(upper, axis) return result np.clip (defined in ...


0

The x.fillna() is still column-wise operation. x.mean(axis=1) Out[73]: 0 2 1 3 2 3 dtype: float64 So, first column is filled by 2, second column is filled by 3. If I try x.fillna(x.mean(axis=1), axis=1), I get NotImplementedError: Currently only can fill with dict/Series column by column Perhaps a workaround is to use transpose ...


1

This issue is indeed already under discussion (link); problem seems to be the algorithm for calculating the standard deviation which is used by pandas since it is not as numerically stable as the one used by numpy. An easy workaround would be to apply .values to the series first and then apply std to these values; in this case numpy's std is used: ...


1

After asking this same question in cross correlated @wuber edited my post by adding the multidimensional-scaling keyword. With this keyword I could find many algorithms, starting from the wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multidimensional_scaling


0

Apart from performing vectorized operation using numpy standard vectorized functions, you can also make your custom vectorized function using numpy.vectorize. Here is one example: >>> def myfunc(a, b): ... "Return a-b if a>b, otherwise return a+b" ... if a > b: ... return a - b ... else: ... ...


0

It seems you can just use np.einsum for a vectorized solution, like so - trend = np.einsum('i,ji->i',dat[0:aW3.shape[1],0],aW3) Or with broadcasting - trend = (dat[0:aW3.shape[1],0]*aW3).sum(0)


3

When you do ary = np.array([[1, 10], [2, 9], [3, 8], [4, 7], [5, 6], [6, 5]]) You create an array of integer dtype. That means that ary_new = array.copy() is also an array of integer dtype. It cannot hold floating-point numbers; when you try to put floats into it: ary_new[:, columns] = ... they are automatically cast to integers. If you want an ...


0

You could initialize an empty array with data.shape[1] - 1 rows to store your fitted parameters, then fill in the rows one-by-one as you process the data: fitparam = empty((data.shape[1] - 1, 3), float) init_vals = [a, b, c] for ii in arange(1, data.shape[1]): popt, pcov = curve_fit(func, data[:,0], data[:,ii], p0=init_vals) init_vals = popt ...


1

Firstly, fields in a structured array are not the same thing as dimensions in a regular ndarray. You want your Ticket_label array to be 1-dimensional, but for each row element in that dimension to contain 7 fields, e.g.: Ticket_data = np.empty((0,), dtype='str,datetime64[m],datetime64[m],str,str,str,str') Now in order to concatenate ...


2

This should do the trick: df = pd.DataFrame({'months_to_maturity':[5,6,11,12,23],'coupon' : [0,0,0,0,.5]}) matrix_of_coupons_and_facevalues = np.zeros((5,5)) for i,row in df.iterrows(): matrix_of_coupons_and_facevalues[i,0:row.months_to_maturity/6] = row['coupon'] matrix_of_coupons_and_facevalues array([[ 0. , 0. , 0. , 0. , 0. ], [ 0. ...


0

For pandas >= 0.13.0: Passing a Series directly to a cython function expecting an ndarray type will no long work directly, you must pass Series.values So before TA-lib revises its API to accommodate the newer pandas versions, you need to use Series.values or DataFrame.values.


1

A simple way is to use itertools.izip_longest to group the rows of your input file into groups of 5. The key is to do the following: for rows in izip_longest(*[file_object]*N): # rows will be a tuple of N consecutive rows # do something with rows Full example: import numpy as np from itertools import izip_longest data = [] with open(filehandle, ...


0

In the easy version you are passing symbol names as strings. This is not the same as a symbol. Check the use of as_symbol in Minimal example of rpy2 regression using pandas data frame


2

Per the comments, we wish to have each process work on a 10000-row chunk. That's not too hard to to do; see the iter/islice recipe below. However, the problem with using pool.map(worker, ten_thousand_row_chunks) is that pool.map will attempt to put all the chunks in a task queue at once. If this requires more memory than is available then you get a ...


3

First of all itertools.groupby will not make any real sense if the records are not already sorted on the key column. Moreover, if you requirement is just to chunk the csv file into a predetermined number of rows and give it to a worker , then you don’t have to do all these. A simple implementation will be: import csv from multiprocessing import Pool def ...


3

There's no reason to use loops here. And you really shouldn't use Numba or Cython for this stuff - linear algebra expressions like the one you have are the whole reason behind vectorized operations in Numpy. Since this type of problem is going to pop up again and again if you keep using Numpy, I would recommend getting a basic handle on linear algebra in ...


2

Here is a function that does the calculation without any for loops and without any large temporary array. See the related question for a longer answer, complete with a test script. def fbest(A, X): "" KA_best = np.tensordot(A.sum(1)[:,None] * X, X, axes=[(0,), (0,)]) KA_best += np.tensordot(A.sum(0)[:,None] * X, X, axes=[(0,), (0,)]) KA_best -= ...


2

You can use np.where for this type of stuff. Consider the following: import pandas as pd df = pd.DataFrame({ 'a': range(20)}) df['even'] = df.a % 2 == 0 So now even is a boolean column. To create an array the way you like, you can use np.where(df.even, 1, -1) You can assign this back to the DataFrame, if you like: df['foo'] = np.where(df.even, ...


0

@joe-kington I've got about 20%-25% speed improvement over np.diff / np.nonzero solution by using argmax instead (see code below, condition is boolean) def contiguous_regions(condition): idx = [] i = 0 while i < len(condition): x1 = i + condition[i:].argmax() try: x2 = x1 + condition[x1:].argmin() except: ...


2

We are adding the ability to index directly even in a multi-dtype frame. This is in master now and will be in 0.17.0. You can do this in < 0.17.0, but it requires (more) manipulation of the internals. In [1]: df = DataFrame({'A' : range(5), 'B' : range(6,11), 'C' : 'foo'}) In [2]: df.dtypes Out[2]: A int64 B int64 C object dtype: object ...


1

dotprod2 = np.dot( first, dotprod1) fails because first is of shape (3000, ) and dotprod1 is of shape (20, 3000), swap them and the error will go (if that's your intention): dotprod2 = np.dot(dotprod1, first) besides, you can also use np.ndarray.dot to make the semantics clear: dotprod2 = dotprod1.dot(first)


2

It's better to set a error callback function via numpy.seterr() class InvalidValueError(Exception): pass class DivideByZeroError(Exception): pass def err_handler(err, flag): if flag == 8: raise InvalidValueError(err) if flag == 1: raise DivideByZeroError(err) np.seterrcall(err_handler) np.seterr(divide='call', invalid='call') In ...


2

This should be handled with IEEE floating point exceptions, where 0.0/0.0 = NaN and 1.0/0.0 = inf. In your example you could ignore the corresponding numpy warnings, np.seterr(divide='ignore', invalid='ignore') calculate the result of the division, then tests it with np.isnan and np.isinf to discriminate between the two cases and handle them ...


0

Robert Kern is correct. You cannot run it from within python. I had a similar error on my windows computer. The problem is that f2py is not in the path. You'll have to call f2py in the following method from the command prompt. python C:\Path\to\f2py.py That should allow it to be called. As an example, I have python 3.4 installed in the C directory in ...


2

The glitch is that j following parentheses doesn't convert to a complex number. In [41]:(1)j File "<ipython-input-41-874f75f848c4>", line 1 (1)j ^ SyntaxError: invalid syntax Multiplying a value by 1j will work, and these lines give x, y equivalent to your first line: num_x_steps = 3 num_y_steps = 5 x, y = np.mgrid[0:1:(num_x_steps * ...


2

I think what you are looking for is to convert the num of steps to a complex number. num_x_steps = 3 x_steps = complex(str(num_x_steps) + "j") num_y_steps = 5 y_steps = complex(str(num_y_steps) + "j") x, y = np.mgrid[0:1:x_steps, 0:2:y_steps]


1

Each step of your loop overrides x. If you want to create a 3-dimensional array (500,500,100), you can do so in several ways: Broadcasting (probably the most efficient): >>> res = M[:, :, None] * arr[None, None, :] >>> res.shape (500L, 500L, 100L) Creating an output array and populating it: >>> res = np.empty((500, 500, 100)) ...


0

I think I may have worked on a problem similar to yours in a research project of mine involving Laue Diffraction patterns (material science). I was tasked with finding the length, width, and angle of inclination of each peak in a diffraction pattern given the center coordinates of each peak. My solution was to select a region of interest around the peak and ...


0

np.array(list_for_hist) converts all items in list_for_hist to a common dtype. When list_for_hist contains both floats and strings, np.array returns an array containing all strings: In [32]: np.array(list_for_hist) Out[32]: array(['8.0', '19.0', '4.0', '4.0', '8.0', '3.0', '13.0', '', '10.0', '7.0', '17.0', '16.0', '8.0', '6.0', '13.0', '8.0', ...


2

It's effectively identical to what you're doing, but you might find it a bit more convenient to do: new_array = my_array[np.r_[2, 4, 6:len(my_array):3]] np.r_ is basically concatenation + arange-like slicing. For example: In [1]: import numpy as np In [2]: np.r_[np.arange(5), np.arange(1, 4)] Out[2]: array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3]) In [3]: np.r_[1, 2, ...


3

This is not related with numpy matrix, but how python deal with your i = i - y i - y produces a new reference of an array. When you assigns it to name i, so i is not referred to the one it was before, but the newly created array. The following code will meet your purpose for idx, i in enumerate(m): m[idx] = i - y


3

Update: I realize that the easiest thing is to do m = m-y This does directly what I expected!


1

The syntax you are using is appropriate for **apply*, which is a single invocation, and not batch parallel. >>> from pathos.multiprocessing import ProcessPool as Pool >>> p = Pool() >>> >>> def do_it(x,y,z): ... return x+y*z ... >>> p.apply(do_it, [2,3,4]) 14 If you want to use batch parallel, you'd need to ...


1

The reason you are getting (4345,) as an output is because the lists inside of the array are not the same length, hence it cannot give you the second number. For example: Say the array is [[1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7,8,9,10]]. The shape cannot give you the second digit because it can be both 3 or 4. As for the d = part you should be using d = [[x * 0.25 for x in ...


2

Somewhere, in your list of lists, is a list of the wrong length In [3]: numpy.array([range(i) for i in range(50)])*.25 #these lists are of different length --------------------------------------------------------------------------- TypeError Traceback (most recent call last) <ipython-input-3-29e79fee6349> in ...


0

The error is that ldata list items is itself a list(ldata is a list of lists). If you want ldata to be 2-d array, then you can do this ldata_new = [] for data in ldata: cc = np.array(data) d = cc*0.25 ldata_new.append(d) cc = np.array(ldata_new) Now cc will be of numpy.ndarray type


1

I've had similar problems before and I found that convergence could not be reached if x0 was of type float32. After casting it to np.float64, it would work like a charm. That might not be the solution to your problem, but I think it's worth a try.


3

Your kernel sums to zero and hence, astropy will raise the warning RuntimeWarning: invalid value encountered in true_divide kernel_internal /= kernel_sum which eventually leads to all the nans.


5

Why not use the power of numpy for division if you are using it for std? >>> # You can create these array in a loop if you want >>> a = np.array([a1, a2, a3, ..., a9]) >>> b = np.array([b1, b2, b3, ..., b9]) >>> c = np.std(a / b, 0) Example (with details about np.std): >>> a1 = np.array([1, 2, 3]) ...


0

So a while back I wrote a class that essentially does what you're asking for. The only trick is that you'll have to pass the class a list of iterators for each array. column_iter_traversal.py """ This code will take in a iterator of iterators. You can view the first iterator as the rows of a graph (a matrix being a specific case of graphs) and each ...


0

You could have each a and b array in another array. So it would be a[0] = a1, a[1] = a2, etc. samething for b Then something like: for i in range(length(a)): div_array = [] for j in range(length(a[i])): div = a[i][j]/b[i][j] div_array.append(div) std.append(np.std(div_array)) Then you have an array std with all the values ...


-1

Ok, this isn't the cleanest code, but I can't see a way around it. Maybe what I'm really asking for isn't a logarithmic CDF, but I'll wait for a statistician to tell me otherwise. Anyway, here is what I came up with: # retrieve event times and latencies from the file times, latencies = read_in_data_from_file('myfile.csv') cdfx = numpy.sort(latencies) cdfy = ...


1

The operation of map() and I assume consequently of pool.map() (I haven't used it myself) is as follows. Calling map(myfunc, [1, 2, 3]) calls myfunc on each of the arguments 1, 2, 3 in turn. myfunc(1), then myfunc(2) etc. So pool.map(kriging1D, [x,v,a,n]) is equivalent to calling kriging1D(x), then kriging1D(v), and so on, no? From your method body, it ...


0

You can employ a two-nested loop format iterating along the last dimension of X. Now, that last dimension is 20, so hopefully it would still be efficient enough and more importantly leave minimum memory footprint. Here's the implementation - n, d = X.shape c = X.reshape(n, -1, d) - X.reshape(-1, n, d) out = np.empty((d,d)) # d is a small number: 20 for i ...


2

If you replace the final line with return np.einsum('ij,ijk,ijl->kl',A,c,c) you avoid creating the A.reshape(n, n, -1) * c (3301 by 3301 by 20) intermediate that I think is your main problem. My impression is that the version I give is probably slower (for cases where it doesn't run out of memory), but I haven't rigourously timed it. It's possible ...


1

Something like: import numpy as np eg_array = 5 + (np.random.randn(10, 10) * 2) normed = (eg_array - eg_array.mean(axis=0)) / eg_array.std(axis=0) normed.mean(axis=0) Out[14]: array([ 1.16573418e-16, -7.77156117e-17, -1.77635684e-16, 9.43689571e-17, -2.22044605e-17, -6.09234885e-16, -2.22044605e-16, -4.44089210e-17, ...



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