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34

I faced this problem myself. You need to use the x86 version of the application which is usually located at C:\Program Files (x86)\NUnit 2.5.10\bin\net-2.0\nunit-x86.exe And that does not throw the exception.


31

Since version 2.5.7, NUnit allows Teardown to detect if last test failed. A new TestContext class allows tests to access information about themselves including the TestStauts. For more details, please refer to http://nunit.org/?p=releaseNotes&r=2.5.7 [TearDown] public void TearDown() { if (TestContext.CurrentContext.Result.Status == ...


30

Instead of using RowTest, you can use TestCase. A previous testing using RowTest would look like: [RowTest] [Row("foo", false)] [Row("", true)] public void Some_test(string value, bool expected) { // test } And the same thing with TestCase looks like this: [TestCase("foo", false)] [TestCase("", true)] public void Some_test(string value, bool expected) ...


16

I've just encountered the same problem. The fix is to edit the NUnit.exe.config file and add this: <startup> <requiredRuntime version="4.0.30319" /> </startup> as a child of the configuration element. It also fixes another problem which is that you couldn't attach to NUnit from the debugger in order to set breakpoints in your tests.


15

This idea got me interested, so I did a little digging. NUnit doesn't have this ability out of the box, but there is a whole extensibility framework supplied with NUnit. I found this great article about extending NUnit - it was a good starting point. After playing around with it, I came up with the following solution: a method decorated with a custom ...


14

Combine Kev's advice ( add /framework=4.0.30319 to the parameter list) and modify nunit-console.exe.config with the following: under <configuration> add: <startup> <requiredRuntime version="v4.0.30319" /></startup> under <configuration><runtime> add: <legacyUnhandledExceptionPolicy enabled="1" />


13

There's a few different ways to do it; I use Assert.Throws. var exception = Assert.Throws<YourTypeOfException>(()=> Action goes here); e.g. var exception = Assert .Throws<ArgumentNullException>(()=> new ChimpPuncher(null)); You can then query the exception object further if you want, e.g. ...


8

Change this: var controller = new ExtensionController(repos); to this: var controller = new ExtensionController(repos.Object); PS.: I know it sucks, but that's the way Moq was designed.


7

I think you're better off letting the developers use nUnit. It's already nicely designed and flexible. If you want to make life easier for your developers, try building some helper classes that set up test objects and sample data in configurations that are needed by many different tests. Maybe try something like the Creation Method pattern. That's from a ...


6

One option could be to try out the TestCaseSource attribute that's supported - basically, you can define an IEnumerable method as source of data for a test - and within that, you can look anywhere you like for test data - could be to pull from a database/flat file/iterater round files in a given directory etc. Have a look at that, it's a handy thing to know ...


6

I got csv based data driven testing in NUnit working as follows: Use the csv reader from code project, wrapped up in a private method returning IEnumerable in your test class, and then reference this with a TestCaseSource attribute on your test cases. Include your csv file in your project and set "Copy to Output Directory" to "Copy Always". using ...


6

I have recently completed a portcover fork that will hook into the .NET4 CLR - maybe you could give that a try http://github.com/sawilde/partcover.net4


6

TearDown and SetUp are executed for each of your tests in test fixture. Consider you have following tests: [TestCase("Joe", "Smith")] public void Test1(string firstName, string lastName) { ... } [Test] public void Test2() { ... } [TestCase(10)] public void Test3(int value) { ... } What is expected signature of TearDown method? So, answer is no. NUnit ...


5

Typically you would create two projects: the "main" project to be released, and a separate project containing only unit tests. That way, you don't distribute your tests in any way.


5

I would look at the parameterized tests documentation in NUnit 2.5 and see if you can do something like what you're doing there. I do not recall NUnit having a built-in CSV reading attribute to drive parameterized tests. There may be a community plug-in somewhere though. I should also point out that if you are just looking for non-MS Unit Testing framework ...


5

The problem itself appears because most likely you have option Enable Just My Code turned on (Tools->Options->Debugging->General->Enable Just My Code). "When this feature is enabled, the debugger displays and steps into user code ("My Code") only, ignoring system code and other code that is optimized or does not have debugging symbols" (see "General, ...


5

From NUnit documentation: // Allow both ApplicationException and any derived type Assert.Throws( Is.InstanceOf( typeof(ApplicationException), code ); Assert.Throws( Is.InstanceOf<ApplicationException>(), code );


5

There are couples comparaison out there. MSTest vs. NUnit with Visual Studio 2010 & TDD NUnit vs. MbUnit vs. MSTest vs. xUnit.net NUnit vs. MsTest: NUnit wins for Unit Testing


5

You could use LINQ: Assert.That(people.Any(p => p.Name == "joe")); or, if you want to be explicit about there being exactly one person with each name: Assert.That(people.Count(p => p.Name == "joe"), Is.EqualTo(1)); If you want a better error message than "Assertion failed, expected true, was false", you could create your own assert method. For ...


4

I know this is an old question, but if you haven't already, you should check out SpecFlow. It allows you to write the spec in clear text in a feature file. The tool will auto-generate NUnit tests based on the feature file.


4

Yes, TestDriven.Net, Nunit and Resharper provide integration with VS. More details in the two posts below (in response to the same question). Unit test, NUnit or Visual studio ? and Unit test, NUnit or Visual studio ?


4

The class needs to be public if you want it to be accessible from another assembly: namespace MyNamespace { public class MyClass { } } If your project cannot afford it you may take a look at [InternalsVisibleTo] attribute.


4

If you download, and add a reference to, StoryQ, you can use a nice BDD style (see samples by clicking the link) and at the same time use NUnit as usual (and TestDriven.Net, R#'s runner, or what have you).


4

RowTest was an extension that was merged in temporarily, and was removed in 2.5 Alpha 2 Quote from the Release Notes for 2.4.8: NUnit now includes the RowTest extension, written by Andreas Schlapsi, in it's extension assemblies. This extension allows you to write test methods that take arguments and to provide multiple sets of argument ...


4

Assert.Throws<InvalidOperationException>( delegate { object current = nullNodeList.GetEnumerator().Current; });


4

For single initialization point you should use class marked with [SetUpFixture] attribute and method marked with [SetUp], for example: [SetUpFixture] public class TestsInitializer { [SetUp] public void InitializeLogger() { LoggingFacility.InitLogger(); } } Now, this method ([SetUp] InitializeLogger) will run before any test is run, ...


4

That really isn't the intended use of TestFixture... If you don't want to use an if, why not just be explicit in your tests? You can use a TestCase for values you expect to pass a certain test. [TestFixture] public class Tests { [TestCase("test1")] public void FooTest_One(String value) { Foo f = new Foo(value); ...


4

Regex.Escape(@"\r\n") will produce \\r\\n, which is not what you want. I would suggest moving the newline to the unescaped string instead: var patternB = @".*\r\n"; var patternC = Regex.Escape(@"The statement has been terminated.");


3

After running the scenarios on multiple machines, I was able to determine that those machines with .Net 4.5 installed were able to access the child elements, while those with only .Net 4.0 were not. Note that the application and tests were all compiled for .Net 4.0. Hopefully this helps anyone else that comes across this issue.


3

If your intention is to run tests of your application in action, NUnit is not the best choice, it just wasn't intended to be used that way. NUnit is for unit tests, not integration tests, which would test how your UI integrates with logic and data. When unit tests are running (including those under nunit), there is no screenshot to be captured - the test ...



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