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191

Updated answer, improved according to feedback Unfortunately there is no perfect way, unless you use _proto_ recursively and access all non-enumerable properties, but this works in FireFox only. So the best I can do is to guess usage scenarios. 1) Fast and limited. Works when you have simple JSON-style objects without methods and DOM nodes inside: ...


47

Here is my commented solution (gory details after the code): Object.equals = function( x, y ) { if ( x === y ) return true; // if both x and y are null or undefined and exactly the same if ( ! ( x instanceof Object ) || ! ( y instanceof Object ) ) return false; // if they are not strictly equal, they both need to be Objects if ( ...


23

Shouldn't that be if ([extension isEqualToString:wantedExtension]) { ... } "==" compares the pointers. isEqual: and isEqualToString: compare the strings, although isEqualToString is better if you know both extension and wantedExtension are NSString (which you do in this case). Actually, if you're an old C++ and Java programmer like me, you might be ...


21

Use the equals method. Why are you so worried that it's expensive?


16

The above code will call itself recursively until you get a stack overflow (snicker) and the program crashes. The method itself (the one you wrote) is the equality operator, which is then called again explicitly within the body. The idea behind overriding the equality operator (operator==) is that you can decide for yourself how equality should be ...


12

I was looking for the same thing and fount an existing way to do so without any custom code or matchers. Use toEqual().


11

Certainly not the only way - you could prototype a method (against Object here but I certainly wouldn't suggest using Object for live code) to replicate C#/Java style comparison methods. Edit, since a general example seems to be expected: Object.prototype.equals = function(x) { for(p in this) { switch(typeof(this[p])) { case ...


10

This is what the equals method does: public boolean equals(Object obj) { if (obj instanceof Integer) { return value == ((Integer)obj).intValue(); } return false; } As you can see, there's no hash code calculation, but there are a few other operations taking place there. Although x.intValue() == y.intValue() might be slightly faster, ...


10

if (x.equals(y)) This looks like an expensive operation. Are there any hash codes calculated this way? It is not an expensive operation and no hash codes are calculated. Java does not magically calculate hash codes, equals(...) is just a method call, not different from any other method call. The JVM will most likely even optimize the method call ...


9

Paul's answer is technically correct, but as stated in the NSString documentation, "When you know both objects are strings, this method [isEqualToString:] is a faster way to check equality than isEqual:." Thus, for your example code, the correct test is if([extension isEqualToString:wantedExtension]) { ... } If extension is nil, the result will be ...


9

It doesn't matter if Point is immutable. What matters is that the == is doing a pointer/reference comparison. It is checking to see if middle_s and middle_t reference the same Object instance, not whether or not they are the same in terms of their internal fields. What you probably want to do is implement/override equals() for the Point class such that it ...


8

The following algorithm will deal with self-referential data structures, numbers, strings, dates, and of course plain nested javascript objects: Objects are considered equivalent when They are exactly equal per === (String and Number are unwrapped first to ensure 42 is equivalent to Number(42)) or they are both dates and have the same valueOf() or they ...


6

I wrote this piece of code for object comparison, and it seems to work. check the assertions: function countProps(obj) { var count = 0; for (k in obj) { if (obj.hasOwnProperty(k)) { count++; } } return count; }; function objectEquals(v1, v2) { if (typeof(v1) !== typeof(v2)) { return false; } ...


6

There's no difference, however some people tend to use null on the left so that in case they have to write if (null == object) and they forget an = it won't compile instead of assigning null to object as it would be the case by writing if (object = null) by mistake instead of if (object == null). That's the reason why you sometimes see null on the left.


6

It's called the Flyweight pattern and is used to minimize memory usage. Those numbers are very likely to be used repeatedly, and autobox types like Integer are immutable (note this is done not just for Integer). Caching them makes it so there aren't lots of instances and reduces GC (Garbage Collection) work as well. The JLS covers this in 5.1.7. Boxing ...


4

Here is my version, pretty much stuff from this thread is integrated (same counts for the test cases): Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, "equals", { enumerable: false, value: function (obj) { var p; if (this === obj) { return true; } // some checks for native types first // function and ...


3

In Ruby, == can be overloaded, so it could do anything the designer of the class you're comparing wants it to do. In that respect, it's very similar to Java's equals() method. The convention is for == to do value comparison, and most classes follow that convention, String included. So you're right, using == for comparing strings will do the expected thing. ...


3

Your classes likely do not define a meaningful __eq__, and thus are being compared for object identity. Since the classes loaded from pickles are not the same objects as the ones in your generated list (even though they have the same data), you get False.


3

I would go with x.equals(y) because that's consistent way to check equality for all classes. As far as performance goes, equals is actually more expensive because it ends up calling intValue(). EDIT: You should avoid autoboxing in most cases. It can get really confusing, especially the author doesn't know what he was doing. You can try this code and you ...


3

I have modified a bit the code above. for me 0 !== false and null !== undefined. If you do not need such strict check remove one "=" sign in "this[p] !== x[p]" inside the code. Object.prototype.equals = function(x){ for (var p in this) { if(typeof(this[p]) !== typeof(x[p])) return false; if((this[p]===null) !== (x[p]===null)) return ...


3

Your problem is with truthyness. You are trying to compare two different instances of an object which is true for regular equality ( a == b ) but not true for strict equality ( a === b). The comparator that jasmine uses is jasmine.Env.equals_() which looks for strict equality. To accomplish what you need without changing your code you can use the regular ...


2

Remember that in Objective-C there is no operator overloading. What the == is doing in this case is a perfectly legal and well-used usage, comparing two pointers. You have two pointers that will always point to two different objects, so the == operator will always be false.


2

if you work without the JSON-Lib, maybe this will help ya out: Object.prototype.equals = function(b) { var a = this; for(i in a) { if(typeof b[i] == 'undefined') { return false; } if(typeof b[i] == 'object') { if(!b[i].equals(a[i])) { return false; } } if(b[i] != a[i]) { return false; } } for(i in b) { if(typeof a[i] == ...


2

The accepted answer seems way too complicated for the problem at hand, if I'm reading this correctly. If I understand you correctly, you're trying to run a query like: var q = from e in Context.SomeEntities where e.NickNameId == someIntPassedIn select e; ...but this won't work, because e.NickNameId is an entity, not an integer. To ...


2

You should call SelectAllByKey('NickName.ID','1'). Since ID is property of property, you could use this extension method: public static MemberExpression PropertyOfProperty(this Expression expr,string propertyName) { var properties = propertyName.Split('.'); MemberExpression expression = null; foreach (var property in properties) ...


2

There is no flag to tell if you a property was explicitly set. What you could do is declare your properties as nullable types and compare value to null.


2

It doesn't really matter whether Point is immutable... the real question still remains. What's important is whether you care about the identity of the point objects--whether they are the same instance--or you care about the value of the point objects. Here, clearly you care about the value of the point, not which object instance it is, so you should be ...


2

Utils.compareObjects = function(o1, o2){ for(var p in o1){ if(o1.hasOwnProperty(p)){ if(o1[p] !== o2[p]){ return false; } } } for(var p in o2){ if(o2.hasOwnProperty(p)){ if(o1[p] !== o2[p]){ return false; } } } return true; }; ...


2

There is no difference. It's just like saying A = B and B = A.


2

I think that creating any object takes more time than taking it from the symbol table. Moreover, if I am not mistaken, every object on the heap takes up 24 bytes of additional space for the header. Now, if a programmer writes his/her program, most of the operations are done on small ints (in this case, small Integers). So it allows to save a lot of space and ...



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