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45

Why we abandoned Object Databases A while back, I was part of a Solaris/C++ project that used the Objectivity object database. We eventually switched the project over to Sybase. This was about 10 years ago, so I'm sure a lot has changed since then, but a few of the observations still apply. The application was a carrier-class telecom system. The basic ...


32

I feel it often boils down to people thinking of the relational model being the de facto standard because that's what everyone's used for the past X years. ** Disclaimer: I'm in my 20's; the following comes from research notes and not experience, so may be inaccurate.* It seems that in the early days of databases, around the 1950/60s network, object, and ...


27

I'd answer this differently: object and graph databases operate on two different levels of abstraction. An object database's main data elements are objects, the way we know them from an object-oriented programming language. A graph database's main data elements are nodes and edges. An object database does not have the notion of a (bidirectional) edge ...


23

"The Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Switzerland uses an Objectivity DB. The database is currently being tested in the hundreds of terabytes at data rates up to 35 MB/second." ie: The Single Most expensive experiment in Human history uses a OODBMS. Maturity and Simplicity are the two main factors in the lack of OODBMSs being used. In general terms ...


18

The concept of an OODBMS is quite broken, and the various commercial and free offerings that have emerged over the last few decades have barely made a dint in the marketplace. The relational model is more powerful than object models in terms of the kinds of questions you can ask of your data. Unfortunately, SQL threw out much of the expressive power that ...


16

i have made an answer here before, Relational db SQL and standards easy to model can use only standard and vendor types referential integrity (matematically solid relational set theory) lot of tools and database implementations data separate from program storage management and high end infrastructure support transaction and concurrency management done ...


14

This might sound like a stupid answer but... They're not widely used, because they're not widely used - I think that the issue with people not using OODBs is that more people feel comfortable with SQL etc. (because they already know it well, and because they know that everyone uses it)


13

Relational database: Pros: Established technology - lots of tools, developers, resources Wide range of Open Source and commercial products Known to scale to very large sites, and very high throughput Expresses many problem domains in a logical and "programmable" way Fairly standard language (SQL) Cons: Impedance mismatch with OO concepts - ...


12

I find the following arguments flawed: I've used such and such OODB and it was inferior- thuse every OODB is inferior Use RDB as everyone uses RDB - millions of Chinese can't be wrong Object databases are proven inferior (slow, buggy, can't handle massive data) - by anonymous authority I don't know much about OODB - they must be inferior There was a time ...


12

Most NoSQL databases are built to scale very well. This is done at the cost of consistency, of which referential integrity is part of. So most NoSQL don't support any type of relational constraints. There's one type of NoSQL database that does support relations. In fact, it's designed especially for relations: the graph database. Graph databases store nodes ...


10

OO databases never got out of a niche market. They are good for some applications - where the data structure lends itself to being represented by an object graph - but never held the compelling advantage over a RDBMS to cross the chasm. The key advantage touted for OODBMS products is the tight integration to the host language - there is no ...


10

I worked with OODBs a few years ago and... They apply very well to niche situations. Those are generally caching type applications and complex objects for smaller sets of data (think 911 dispatcher type application) They do not handle schema changes well at all. You pretty much have to write code to mutate each object. Imagine writing objects that ...


10

Yes, the API seems like the major difference, but is not really a superficial one. Conceptually a set of objects will form a graph and you could think of an API that treats this graph in a uniform way. Conversely, you could in theory mine a generic graph structure for patterns and map them to objects exposed via some API. But the design of the API of an ...


10

First, db4o handles the 'simple' scenarios like adding or removing a field automatically. When you adding the field, all existing object have the default value stored. When you remove a field, the data of existing object is still in the database and you can still access it. Renaming field etc are special 'refactoring'-calls. Now your scenario you would do ...


9

db4o works on both Java and .NET.


9

Given the requirements you specify in your question, a graph database is probably the sort of thing you are looking for, but there are other options. As @Niels van der Rest said, the two constraints of "no a priori schema" and "referential integrity" are very hard to reconcile. You might be able to find a Topic-Map based database that might do so, but I'm ...


7

I think what you are describing could easily be modeled in a graph database. Then you get the benefit of navigating to the nodes/edges where you want to make changes without any need to retrieve anything else. For the JVM there's the Neo4j open source graph database (where I'm part of the team). You can read about it over at High Scalability, as part of an ...


7

This might be a bit late but I am using RavenDB (more here) which works like a charm! It works very well with the RavenDB.Client only and a file based document store for simple scenarios.


7

Some NoSQL solutions support security and SQL. One of these is OrientDB. The security system is (quite) well explained here. Furthermore supports SQL.


6

Try http://www.db4o.com/ Here's a list of oo databases and also a comparison chart.


6

As Will descibes from another angle, a graphdb will keep your data separated from your application classes and objects. A graphdb also has more built-in functionality to deal with graphs, obviously - like shortest path or deep traversals. Another important difference is that in a graphdb like neo4j you can traverse the graph based on relationship (edge) ...


5

Object Oriented databases are good at storing objects, and obviously allow objects to be related to each other in simple ways. But in a real world application the interesting stuff is about the relationships between the data; where the results of the query relate tables in interesting ways that go beyond that attibutes of a single object. I think many ORMs / ...


5

I worked on a project using an OO database. It had it's perks but the biggest downside, besides performance and poorly documented API, was that it was impossible to see what data was actually stored in the database without writing code. All the developers would've killed for: SHOW TABLES; SHOW COLUMNS FROM table; SELECT * FROM table; In the ...


5

Check out db4o.


5

In fact, database systems are one of the areas that fundamental changes are really hard. Billions of dollars are spent on relational database systems and they are working pretty well. In real life, that's simply not true. A major reason for our problems with databases (I saw a claim 30% of all database rows contain errors) is the use of very ...


5

Fundamentally, I difference between a MMDB and a OODB is that the MMDB has the expectation that all of its data is based in RAM, but persisted to disk at some point. Whereas an OODB is more conventional in that there's no expectation of the entire DB fitting in to RAM. The MMDB can leverage this by giving up on the concept that the persisted data doesn't ...


5

You could try out db4o which is available in C# and Java.


5

Take a look at 100% .NET object database - siaqodb ( http://siaqodb.com )


5

"What about support for other OO databases in other ORM solutions?" Object-Relational Mapping (ORM) is a solution to this problem. Objects in the program. A Relational Database. Unless you have BOTH parts (OO program, Relational database) you cannot use ORM because you don't have a problem. If you're writing C programs, you can't use ORM -- you don't ...



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