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2

Put this annotation on your fields: @IgnoreSave(IfNull.class) private String yourField; This will prevent nulls from being stored. There are other If conditions you can use, or you can write your own. @Index and @Unindex also accept these conditions.


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Actually, with Objectify I think you can. Here they give an example: https://code.google.com/p/objectify-appengine/wiki/Entities#Polymorphism I think the datastore can't do it natively, but Objectify will setup a structure for you that allows polymorphism anyway.


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The other answer is not strictly correct. With Objectify, you can query by kind on a superclass and it will seamlessly query all applicable datastore entities which match the inheriting @Entity annotated classes.


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According to https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/objectify-appengine/aRRRQNILQb0 the field tagged with the Objectify annotation @Id needs to be Long instead of long in order for Objectify to auto-generate the Java object's id. So I changed my class definition to: @com.googlecode.objectify.annotation.Entity public class InsightDataSet { ...


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Objectify will not load anything referenced unless you .get() it explicitly, this results in individual fetches, or you tell it to auto load all the things via @Load. That speeds up loading overall because it can batch process the request instead of forming several individual ones. If by "I don't always need the list" you mean that you have distinct cases ...


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While get-by-key operations (like load().type(...).id(...)) are strongly consistent by default, queries are eventually consistent. Here's more information: https://cloud.google.com/developers/articles/balancing-strong-and-eventual-consistency-with-google-cloud-datastore/


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Objectify doesn't know what to do with a Date as a Map key. Map keys get turned into property names, which must be Strings. So you need to invent a DateStringifier class that implements the Stringifier interface. It's trivial, but you have some options - you can stringify your dates as millis-since-epoch or as some sort of human-readable format.


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There is no mechanism to do this at present. The best answer is probably to use something like the maven shade plugin to include com.googlecode.objectify.annotation.* with the shard lib.


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In appengine, an Entity does not have an id. It has a Key, and that Key has an id. In order to retrieve an 'Entity's id', you must first get its Key. Then you can get the Key's id: blague.getKey().getId() // retrieves the id See Entity.getKey() and Key.getId()


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When you use @Parent, you get the object using ancestor. https://code.google.com/p/objectify-appengine/wiki/AdvancedPatterns


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The Objectify session cache stores instances of objects, therefore ignored fields are not actually ignored when an item is loaded from the cache as it just pulls up the last instance rather than creating a new one.


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With any other parameter? If you create an object without deciding on the key, but provide (for instance) a city, a userName, an email, then you search by city, username, email. Once you have that, you have the object. From there you can get the object's key if you need it.


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Start with the simplest/easiest approach, you can always migrate later. From what you describe, I would start with Set<Ref> fields pointing in both directions. You can use @Load groups so that the loads don't happen by default but you still have the facility available. Make sure to update both ends of the relationship in a transaction. Another option, ...



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