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37

Here a diagram of what i'll do: So follow the steps and let's go: Make a core.h file, here we define the method concateneMyStringWithCppString that runs on both Android as the iphone, this method will receive a string from android or iphone and will concatenate with a comum cpp string and return this concatened string. #ifndef __HelloCpp__Core__ ...


7

if you want create static lib mean refer the link http://jaym2503.blogspot.in/2013/01/how-to-make-universal-static-library.html Step 1 : Create a New Project, Named it "Logger" Step 2 : Create Classes You can create as many classes you wants, In our tutorial we will create one class named "Logger". So, now two files should be in our resource. 1. Logger.h ...


7

As you mentioned, in C and Objective-C static variables can only be initialised with compile-time constants. In C++ (and therefore Objective-C++) on the other hand, static variables are assigned at run time, before main runs. For more details have a look at Eli Bendersky's Non-constant global initialization in C and C++


6

According to this page: In general you can use C++ objects within a block. Within a member function, references to member variables and functions are via an implicitly imported this pointer and thus appear mutable. There are two considerations that apply if a block is copied: If you have a __block storage class for what would have been a ...


5

Header files are not compiled. Header files are used by the preprocessor — anywhere you have a #include or a #import the actual text of the original is treated as though you'd copied and pasted it into the original. Hence it doesn't matter if your file is called .hpp, .h or anything else. If a .m file imports a .h file that includes a .hpp file then the ...


5

You need to link against the c++ standard library. This normally happens automatically if your compile sources phase contains any c++ files, but if the c++ is all contained within a static library then you need to explicitly ask for it to be linked to the final executable. Check the subproject's build settings. Look for the C++ Standard Library build ...


5

You're not returning an object. You're returning a pointer. There is no copying going on anywhere. Also, your third code sample will never work, because you said b2World is a C++ object, meaning it can't possibly respond to obj-c messages. Also, ARC doesn't affect the semantics of C++ (except when you embed obj-c objects as member variables of C++ ...


5

See this. You have to use the -fcxx-modules flag instead of the -fmodules flag, but as the official documentation suggests - EXPERIMENTAL and VERY BROKEN. I didn't manage to get it working at all... In my opinion it's better to stick with #import and #include until that feature is out of experimental stage. From clang.llvm.org: -fcxx-modules Enable the ...


5

If you're okay with using C++11, you could use something like this: #include <iostream> #include <random> #include <string> int main() { std::random_device rd; std::default_random_engine e1(rd()); std::uniform_int_distribution<int> uniform_dist(0, 9); std::string word = "HELLO"; for (auto ch : word) { ...


4

This is really really basic beginner stuff that suggests to me you don't understand the difference between C-family language's "header files" and "implementation files". Did you search your project and not notice that you are declaring variables in header files but without extern? You even had the name of the global variable in your linker error. Yes, ...


4

In C, C++, and Objective-C a->b means to dereference a and access the member b. In C and C++ it's identical to but more straightforward than (*a).b. Your implementation of -> would therefore be correct if User had a member called name, but it doesn't. If you've written no other code at all, your User has an instance variable called _name and a setter ...


4

That isn't C++, it is Objective-C++. Which indirectly answers the question; you manage Objective-C objects in Objective-C++ exactly as you would in straight Objective-C. For hand rolled threads, you'll need to manage autorelease pools manually. Make sure there is a pool in place prior to the first call to Objective-C in the thread and make sure it is ...


4

One of the many functions that the Accelerate framework provides is vDSP_vspdp, which you can use like this: float * singleBuf; float * doubleBuf = malloc(nElements * sizeof(double)); vDSP_vspdp(singleBuf, 1, doubleBuf, 1, nElements); If you're doing any kind of DSP programming on a Mac, you could save tons of time and gain tons of efficiency by learning ...


3

[[NSBundle mainBundle] bundlePath] will give you the path of the MyApp.app directory. You can then add Contents to that path. Alternatively, [[NSBundle mainBundle] resourcePath] will give you the path to the MyApp.app/Contents/Resources directory. You can then remove the subdirectory from that path; see Working with paths from [[NSBundle mainBundle] ...


3

In order to use property syntax with dot, you need to provide the compiler with the exact type, for example by casting the id pointer to the type of your class. If you do not want to use the exact type or cast, use method call syntax: [[self browser] StartSearch:self];


3

Sorry, but as mentioned in the comments already - it's not a good idea trying to mimick a Classic Mac OS 7 style run loop with Cocoa as pretty much everything (timers, notifications, events, queues, ...) in AppKit relies on the existence of a 'proper' NSRunLoop in every thread of a Cocoa app. You can check this page on CocoaDev or the NSRunLoop docs for ...


3

You can do so in the same way as you can use C++ from C or whatever. You need to be able to declare the interface using pure Objective-C and then the implementation can be written using Objective-C++. If your header file uses C++, e.g. your class has an std::string instance variable, then to make the functionality accessible from Objective-C you have to ...


3

I think you're right about the invalid pointer suspicion. It might be a pointer to a deleted object or it might be a garbage pointer. Either one would be consistent with the mCreated member being different than you expect. In the case of a deleted object, the memory could be used for something else and therefore set to some other value. In the case of a ...


3

As you said in a comment, "fooUser.h" is included from non-C++ files as well, and that causes the compiler error. Header files are not compiled separately, but as part of the "compilation unit" from which they are included. You should try to separate the C++ declarations into a header file that is included only from (Objective-)C++ files. As a workaround, ...


3

Changing the type of the pointer does not change the type of the underlying data. If you are trying to link together two packages that expect different contents in the buffers, you are going to have to copy the data from one buffer to another, converting on the way. So your question is: given a buffer full of floats, how do you convert it to a buffer ...


2

You have mismatched C++ standard library settings. Some of the code is using the new libc++, and some is using GNU's libstdc++. Choose the one you want and change the project settings so they're consistent. You can use the c++filt command line tool to un-mangle C++ symbol names: % c++filt ...


2

You can simply specify the parameter type rather than using a generic id: void someFunction(MONObject * self) { [self.browser StartSearch:self]; } Or if you feel you really, really, really need the type erasure (e.g. for compilation firewall), you might consider rewriting it this way: // Some.mm void someFunction(id self) { MONObject * ...


2

If you want to use Objective-c++ but don't want to name your files .mm checkout my answer to a similar question. Without changing any .m to .mm or anything like that, if you click your project, click tagets->build settings go all the way down to "LLVM GCC 4.2 - Languages" (new xcode says "Apple LLVM compiler 4.2") you will see Compile Sources As ...


2

Use NSBundle class to get informations on your application bundle. [[NSBundle mainBundle] bundlePath] give you full path to MyApp.app.


2

It is because ARC discourages Objective-C objects in POD structures and C++ classes due to the fact that their inclusion makes managing their memory ambiguous. You can resolve it by prefixing Objective-C members with the __unsafe_unretained qualifier, which tells ARC to keep it's sticky fingers off the class, but puts you in the awkward position of having ...


2

Tommy and HotLicks gave you the right answer to your immediate problem -- you need to make sure that all source files that include GLView.h are Objective-C files, by naming them .mm. However, I want to add another side to this. Blindly making all files Objective-C++ is a bad solution. It should lead you to ask yourself: why do all these files need to be ...


2

Yes, you can do this. It's not unusual. In ARC: You just use it and it works. Note that if you put an Objective-C data member inside of a class with no constructors or destructors (a "POD" class), you will get a warning because bad things will happen if that definition is imported into both ARC and MRC code. The solution if that's the case is to add a ...


2

You're unable to make the call from C to C++ (and the same principal applies when it's Objective) due to name mangling, something C++ does to your symbols to enable overloading. If you declare extern "C" int add(int, int); for example, you declare that this C++ function needs to be callable by C and so no name mangling can occur (and no overloading can ...


2

You can read the authentication cookie from all websites using the shared cookie storage. NSHTTPCookie *cookie; NSHTTPCookieStorage *cookieJar = [NSHTTPCookieStorage sharedHTTPCookieStorage]; for (cookie in [cookieJar cookies]) { NSLog(@"%@", cookie); } OR to get the .net aspxauth cookie for your website NSArray *cookiesForURL = [cookieJar ...



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