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292

Summarized from the developer library: From a practical perspective, in iOS and OS X outlets should be defined as declared properties. Outlets should generally be weak, except for those from File’s Owner to top-level objects in a nib file (or, in iOS, a storyboard scene) which should be strong. Outlets that you create will therefore typically be weak by ...


146

Here's an example of how you would accomplish such a task: #import <Foundation/Foundation.h> typedef int (^IntBlock)(); @interface myobj : NSObject { IntBlock compare; } @property(readwrite, copy) IntBlock compare; @end @implementation myobj @synthesize compare; - (void)dealloc { // need to release the block since the property was ...


137

You have many options, depending on how your "baseView" class is meant to be used and integrated in to your application. It's not clear just how you intend to use this class -- as the view in a UIViewController subclass, or as a reusable modular component mean to be instantiated multiple times throughout your application, for use in many different view ...


123

Richard's answer is great, here is a concise version. @property (nonatomic, copy) void (^simpleCompletionBlock)(void); Assuming: You are using xCode > 4.4 and have synthesise by default enabled (otherwise just @synthesise simpleCompletionBlock) You are using ARC (otherwise [_simpleCompletionBlock release] in dealloc).


53

Do not use dot for behavior. Use dot to access or set attribute like stuff, typically attributes declared as properties. x = foo.name; // good foo.age = 42; // good y = x.retain; // bad k.release; // compiler should warn, but some don't. Oops. v.lockFocusIfCanDraw; /// ooh... no. bad bad bad For folks new to Objective-C, I would recommend not using the ...


39

Nil and nil are defined to be the same thing (__DARWIN_NULL), and are meant to signify nullity (a null pointer, like NULL). Nil is meant for class pointers, and nil is meant for object pointers (you can read more on it in objc.h; search for Nil). Finally, you can test for a null value like this: if (object == nil) or like this: if (!object) since ...


38

I assume you are using ARC. Under ARC, the ownership qualification of the property must match the instance variable (ivar). So, for example, if you say that the property is "strong", then the ivar has to be strong as well. In your case you are saying that the property is "assign", which is the same as unsafe_unretained. In other words, this property ...


37

For the record... Here's exactly how to do it from 2014 onwards... with ARC, Xcode5, iOS7. @property (copy)void (^doStuff)(void); Do not use anything other than simply "copy". Do not synthesize. It's that simple. Here's a full and detailed example, with long explanatory comments: In your .h file: // Here is a block as a property: // // So for ...


36

Or, more specifically, (readonly, retain) enables a pattern like this: Foo.h: @interface StuffHolder:NSObject @property(readonly, retain) MyStuff *stuff; @end Foo.m: @interface StuffHolder() @property(readwrite, retain) MyStuff *stuff; @end @implementation StuffHolder @synthesize stuff; @end The end result is a property that is publicly readonly ...


29

The answer is yes. @Caleb points to the right resources, but getting it to work is still quite awkward. I thought I'd place a resumé here: For two NSPersistentStore instances to share the same model, you have to add a configuration to your model, which is a string-named subset of the entities: In the model, to an entity that belongs to the second store, ...


27

I don't see any problem with that. Pre-ARC, I've always made my IBOutlets assign, as they're already retained by their superviews. If you make them weak, you shouldn't have to nil them out in viewDidUnload, as you point out. One caveat: You can support iOS 4.x in an ARC project, but if you do, you can't use weak, so you'd have to make them assign, in which ...


26

You have always been able to declare an @property in a category. What you couldn't do -- and still can't -- is declare storage for the property in the category, neither as an instance variable nor via `@synthesize. However.... @interface MyClass () is not a category. It is a class extension and has a distinctly more specific role than a category. ...


26

Shameless plug: ObjectiveMixin It takes advantage of Objective-C runtime's capability of adding methods to a class in runtime (as opposed to categories, which are compile-time only). Check it out, it works pretty good and in a similar fashion to Ruby's mixins.


21

Edit: changes added because some people feel I am responsible for the limitations of Objective-C. Short answer: you can't. Objective-C doesn't have the equivalent of Ruby mixins. Slightly less short answer: Objective-C does have something with arguably the same flavour: protocols. Protocols (Interfaces in some other languages), are a way to define a set of ...


20

This is correct behavior. foo.method is syntactic sugar for [foo method]—a straight conversion with identical semantics. Similarly foo.prop = bar is syntactic sugar for [foo setProp:bar], again with identical semantics. This transformation is implemented in the compiler. Thus you can use dot notation to call 0-parameter methods as in foo.doSomething instead ...


19

Let me start off by saying that I started programming in Visual/Real Basic, then moved on to Java, so I'm fairly used to dot syntax. However, when I finally moved to Objective-C and got used to brackets, then saw the introduction of Objective-C 2.0 and its dot syntax, I realized that I really don't like it. (for other languages it's fine, because that's how ...


19

In iOS development NIB loading is a little bit different from Mac development. In Mac development an IBOutlet is usually a weak reference: if you have a subclass of NSViewController only the top-level view will be retained and when you dealloc the controller all its subviews and outlets are freed automatically. UiViewController use Key Value Coding to ...


19

Anything you can do with blocks, you can do without them. But they provide a great way to simplify your code and make things cleaner. For example, let's say you have a URL connection and want to wait for the result. Two popular approaches are to provide a delegate callback or use a block. I'll use the fictitious URLConnection class as an example. ...


17

Synthesized ivars (the ability to not manually declare ivars) are a feature of the new Objective-C runtime, which still isn't being used on all systems. For 32-bit Macs (and, until recently, the iPhone simulator), you have to manually declare ivars. If you're only targeting systems with the new runtime, there's no reason to manually declare ivars.


17

You can create such view by setting appropriate property type of modalPresentationStyle. See my example below: UIViewController *V2 = [[UIViewController alloc] init]; V2.modalPresentationStyle = UIModalPresentationFormSheet; V2.modalTransitionStyle = UIModalTransitionStyleCoverVertical; [V1 presentModalViewController:V2 animated:YES]; ...


16

If you want to query whether an object has a setter for a given KVC key called key which corresponds to a declared property, you need to check whether it responds to a selector method called setKey: (starts with set, capitalise the first character in key, add a trailing colon). For instance, NSString *key = @"displayName"; NSString *setterStr = [NSString ...


16

Not sure why others are saying that this is not possible because it is using the sysctl function. - (NSString *)osVersionBuild { int mib[2] = {CTL_KERN, KERN_OSVERSION}; u_int namelen = sizeof(mib) / sizeof(mib[0]); size_t bufferSize = 0; NSString *osBuildVersion = nil; // Get the size for the buffer sysctl(mib, namelen, NULL, ...


15

See fast enumeration documentation. Basically you'd have, usually, an array, and you can obtain each item in the array with a handy loop instead of using NSEnumerator or an integer count variable. It makes your code much cleaner to ask for each NSString in your array rather than to have to assign to a variable using objectAtIndex for each pass of your ...


15

Under the hood, -[NSObject respondsToSelector:] is implemented like this: - (BOOL)respondsToSelector:(SEL)aSelector { return class_respondsToSelector([self class], aSelector); } and +[Class instancesRespondToSelector:] is implemented like this: + (BOOL)instancesRespondToSelector:(SEL)aSelector { return class_respondsToSelector(self, aSelector); } ...


14

I'm a new Cocoa/Objective-C developer, and my take on it is this: I stick to the messaging notation, even though I started with Obj-C 2.0, and even though the dot notation is more familiar feeling (Java is my first language.) My reason for this is pretty simple: I still don't understand exactly why they added the dot notation to the language. To me it seems ...


14

As for the first problem you're having, maybe it's because Although “atomic” means that access to the property is thread-safe, simply making all the properties in your class atomic does not mean that your class or more generally your object graph is “thread safe”—thread safety cannot be expressed at the level of individual accessor methods. As for why ...


13

The Objective-C Programming Language: Declared Properties @property declares the getter and the setter methods for the public property you want to implement. For example this property declaration: @property float value; is equivalent to: - (float)value; - (void)setValue:(float)newValue; @synthesize provides default implementation for these two ...


13

Since Objective-C is a C superset, all Objective-C specific statements are converted into C statements during the compiling of a .m file (by the preprocessor, I guess). That was true in 1988. While Objective-C could still be compiled in that fashion, it hasn't been in a long time. The compiler parses Objective-C, along with C and-- sometimes-- ...


13

The compiler, linker, and runtime work together. First, the compiler parses the source code for each class and emits directives like .long, .zero, and .quad describing the class's instance variables, properties, selectors, and methods. The assembler turns these directives into raw data. The data is in a format that the runtime understands. For example, ...


12

This is a few months late, but the answer is yes; GNUstep will support Objective-C 2.0 features (as well as blocks). Currently, everything is more or less implemented, but needs testing and debugging. These features require Clang rather than gcc, and currently you need to use the trunk version. See David Chisnall's explanation in this thread for more ...



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