Hot answers tagged

670

Damn, it took me a while but I got it: main.c: #include <CoreFoundation/CoreFoundation.h> #include <objc/runtime.h> #include <objc/message.h> // This is a hack. Because we are writing in C, we cannot out and include // <UIKit/UIKit.h>, as that uses Objective-C constructs. // however, neither can we give the full function ...


258

NSString *name = NSStringFromClass ([NSArray class]); You can even go back the other way: Class arrayClass = NSClassFromString (name); id anInstance = [[arrayClass alloc] init];


101

The answer is... well... simple. Simplicity and consistency, in fact. Objective-C is purely dynamic at the moment of method dispatch. In particular, every method dispatch goes through the exact same dynamic method resolution point as every other method dispatch. At runtime, every method implementation has the exact same exposure and all of the APIs ...


63

Here's what you'd want: Class theClass = NSClassFromString(classNameStr); id myObject = [[theClass alloc] init]; Note that you can't use theClass as a type name (i.e. theClass *myObject). You'll have to use id for that.


57

Swift classes that are subclasses of NSObject: are Objective-C classes themselves use objc_msgSend() for calls to (most of) their methods provide Objective-C runtime metadata for (most of) their method implementations Swift classes that are not subclasses of NSObject: are Objective-C classes, but implement only a handful of methods for NSObject ...


52

You have to import the runtime #import <objc/runtime.h>


44

It’s possible to add formal properties to a class via class_addProperty(): BOOL class_addProperty(Class cls, const char *name, const objc_property_attribute_t *attributes, unsigned int attributeCount) The first two parameters are self-explanatory. The third parameter is an array of property attributes, and each property attribute is a ...


43

objc_setAssociatedObject adds a key value store to each Objective-C object. It lets you store additional state for the object, not reflected in its instance variables. It's really convenient when you want to store things belonging to an object outside of the main implementation. One of the main use cases is in categories where you cannot add instance ...


42

According to this blog entry by Erica Sadun (whose credits go to Gwynne Raskind), there is. objc_getAssociatedObject and objc_getAssociatedObject require a key to store the object. Such key is required to be a constant void pointer. So in the end we just need a fixed address that stays constant over time. It turns out that the @selector implementation ...


40

super Essentially, it allows you to use the implementations of the current class' superclass. For the gritty details of the Objective-C runtime: [super message] has the following meaning: When it encounters a method call, the compiler generates a call to one of the functions objc_msgSend, objc_msgSend_stret, objc_msgSendSuper, or ...


38

As mentioned, you can use the Objective-C runtime API to retrieve the instance variable names: unsigned int varCount; Ivar *vars = class_copyIvarList([MyClass class], &varCount); for (int i = 0; i < varCount; i++) { Ivar var = vars[i]; const char* name = ivar_getName(var); const char* typeEncoding = ivar_getTypeEncoding(var); // ...


33

Objective-C is a superset of the C-language, so it is theoretically possible to write a program entirely in C, however, unless you are thoroughly versed in OpenGL ES, You'll need to do at least some objC (Even Rich's sample has a const NSString* in it), else you'll have to write the views yourself. OK, the above is completely wrong. Let me say, I'm ...


29

object_getInstanceVariable is a confused little function. It is documented that the last parameter is a void ** parameter—that is, you pass the address of a void * variable and get a pointer to the instance variable—but it is implemented as if it was a void * parameter—that is, you pass the address of the variable that you want to hold a copy of the instance ...


29

Just use NSMutableString; mutability is why it exists. ;) NSString is constant. Not just "wraps a const char *" constant, but "no, really, this thing is immutable and the storage details are entirely opaque to you". In fact, an __NSCFConstantString isn't even stored on the heap at all; there will be no mallocd chunk of memory you can muck with. Such ...


29

First, it's hard to translate that code to Swift without knowing what you used that class object for in Objective-C. In Objective-C, class objects are objects, and the type Class can hold a pointer to any class object. However, when Objective-C APIs are bridged to Swift, the type Class is converted to AnyClass! in Swift, where AnyClass is defined as ...


27

Since this was written there is now API in iOS and Mac OS X that allows Blocks to be turned into IMPs directly. I wrote up a weblog post describing the API (imp_implementationWithBlock()). A block is effectively a structure that contains a bit of metadata, a reference to the code contained within the block and a copy of the const-copied data captured ...


27

From the reference documents on Objective-C Runtime Reference: You use the Objective-C runtime function objc_setAssociatedObject to make an association between one object and another. The function takes four parameters: the source object, a key, the value, and an association policy constant. The key is a void pointer. The key for ...


25

This code should work under ARC: int numClasses; Class *classes = NULL; classes = NULL; numClasses = objc_getClassList(NULL, 0); NSLog(@"Number of classes: %d", numClasses); if (numClasses > 0 ) { classes = (__unsafe_unretained Class *)malloc(sizeof(Class) * numClasses); numClasses = objc_getClassList(classes, numClasses); for (int i = 0; i ...


22

Selectors are interned C strings and are compared by their address, not their contents. The string contents is only used for converting to/from an external string representation. Interning is done to improve performance--when the runtime is looking up the method implementation that matches a selector it can compare the selector pointers directly instead of ...


21

I went and looked at the documentation again just now, and I think you're misreading it. Synthesized ivars are created at compile time, not at run time. According to the Objective-C 2.0 documentation: There are differences in the behavior that depend on the runtime (see also “Runtime Differences”): For the legacy runtimes, instance variables must ...


21

It's a keyword that's equivalent to self, but starts its message dispatch searching with the superclass's method table.


21

Here is a list of use cases for object associations: one: To add instance variables to categories. In general this technique is advised against, but here is an example of a legitimate use. Let's say you want to simulate additional instance variables for objects you cannot modify (we are talking about modifying the object itself, ie without subclassing). ...


20

1) Why are all (references to) Objective-C objects pointers? Why not plain variables? (i.e. NSArray array = [[NSArray alloc] init];) Think of an Objective-C object as a glorified struct for a moment. NSArray array; in a local scope would be an object "allocated" on the stack. NSArray *array; indicates an object backed by a hunk of memory, ...


20

Selectors are usually used when you want to define a callback mechanism. The most common use case for selectors in Cocoa is with controls, such as buttons. A UIButton is very generic, and as such has no idea what should happen when the button is pressed. Before you can use one, you need to tell it what method should be run when the button is pressed. This is ...


20

You need to cast the function pointer properly or ARC doesn't know what it's supposed to be doing. IMP is a generic function pointer that takes an id, a selector and a variable number of other, undefined arguments and returns an id. The method implementation you're trying to call takes an id, a selector followed by exactly two id parameters and has a void ...


19

Well, the docs on class_getSuperclass() say this: You should usually use NSObject‘s superclass method instead of this function So, I'd go with door #1.


18

The runtime could support it but the cost would be enormous. Every selector that is sent would need to be checked for whether it is private or public for that class, or each class would need to manage two separate dispatch tables. This isn't the same for instance variables because this level of protection is done at compile time. Also, the runtime would ...


18

You need to read this again: Cocoa Memory Management Guidelines In short, if you want something to stick around you must retain it. If you want something to go away and you have previously retained it, you must release or autorelease it. You must never call dealloc directly (except [super dealloc]; at the end of every one of your dealloc methods). You ...


18

You want NSClassFromString: NSString *classNameStr = @"MyExampleClass"; Class theClass = NSClassFromString(classNameStr); id myObject = [[theClass alloc] init]; You can also use the objc runtime interfaces (e.g. objc_getClass(const char* name), objc_lookUpClass(const char* name)). The former will not load a class. The latter will. That option could be a ...



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