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3

The match keyword works with OCaml patterns. A regex isn't an OCaml pattern, it's a different kind of pattern, so you don't use match for them. In the same Str module with the regexp function are the matching functions. If you have a lot of regular expression matching to do, you can use ocamllex, which reads a file of definitions similar to your ...


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int_of_string does not handle leading + signs, so you have to take that out before you pass your string to int_of_string.


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To expand on gasche's answer, you need to change your parser definition as follows: %type <Path.term list> main %% main: | expr EOL main {$1::$3} | expr EOF {[$1]} | EOF {[]} /* if you want to allow a redundant EOL at the end */ ; With your original definition, a single line is considered a complete parse for main, ...


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Each time you call the parser, it will only parse one expression (that's the type of your starting rule); and it will stop at the end of line (given how you use EOL in your grammar). You need to call it several times in a loop if you want to parse several expressions.


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I applaud your persistence in abusing the tools :-) I looked through the sources for ocamllex and I see just one place that's checking whether the automaton is getting too big. lexgen.ml near line 780: let do_alloc_cell used t = let available = try Hashtbl.find tag_cells t with Not_found -> Ints.empty in try Ints.choose (Ints.diff available ...


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Ocamllex's regex doesn't have repetition syntax. The avaibable regex syntax is just as listed in reference manual: http://caml.inria.fr/pub/docs/manual-ocaml-4.01/lexyacc.html#sec274 And I think you can manually list the all possible repetitions as below: ("aa"|"bb"|"cc"|"dd"|"ee"|"ff"| ..............)['a'-'z']+


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StringMap.bindings will return a list of (key, value) pairs.


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The error is telling you that the map value has type StringMap.key list -> int StringMap.t, which means that it's a function, not a map as you expected it. Furthermore, the function signature tells you what was missing in the previous expression to get a int StringMap.t as you expected: you need to add a parameter to the call to List.fold_left, of type ...


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The parser is consuming more than one token in order to see whether the recursive rules are matched, which quite naturally causes the Eof to be raised. Basically your parser is running off the end of the file because it lacks any rule to tell it when to stop looking for more parts of the expression. An easy fix is to change the Eof exception to an token ...


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The problem is that no StringMap module exists: you have to generate one with a functor application such as module StringMap = Map.Make (String). Place this in the header, not the trailer. (The trailer code will be placed at the end of the generated file, and thus bindings established in it cannot be seen from within your lexer code.) If you like you may ...


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The first option is to define tokens in a separate .mly file. Executing menhir for this file with --only-tokens option will generate a module containing type token that you can use in your parser compiled with --external-tokens option. If this solves the problem with tokens, you can specify all other functions that are used by both parser and lexer in a ...


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I'm afraid there's no "pure OCaml" solution, as ident seems to be systematically inlined by ocamllex. You can still put your regexp definition in a file, and use cpp (or any other C pre-processor) to #include it wherever needed though. This is of course an abuse of cpp, as you're not feeding it with .c file, but you wouldn't be the first one to do that. As ...


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It is possible to get the string while you are in the lexer, precisely at the point that is matching the token (eg. Lexing.lexeme). It is too late to try to get it in the parser. We don't want the token stream to keep all strings in memory as it would increase memory consumption a lot (in practice most tokens never need their string representation). Why ...


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Maybe we can set some flag when we are inside subroutine: sub_starts: SUB { inside:=true }; sub_ends: ENDSUB { inside:=false }; subroutine_declaration: sub_starts name body sub_ends { ... } And when this flag is not set you just skip any input?


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I can't try your code because I don't have your Parser module. It looks to me like you need to have this: | end_quote { CSTRING(Buffer.contents string) } In your code, the compiler is complaining that this expression isn't of type unit. In fact its value is a token, which is what you want to return. There's no need to call the scanner at this ...



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