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5

Yes, for most of the systems you can build. I mean, UML and OCL are only semi-formal languages (their syntax is well-defined but their semantics is only partially formalized, many aspects are just described in natural language in the standard document specifications). Therefore, if you are building a critical system and you need to prove the correctness of ...


5

I answer to myself for other people who might have the same problem. OCL constraints checking doesn't work for Papyrus 0.9.x You have to download the latest nighlty build of OCL and Papyrus. You can download them from these repositories : http://download.eclipse.org/modeling/mdt/papyrus/updates/nightly/kepler/ ...


4

post: result= col -> any(a | col->forAll(a2 | a >=a2)) where "any" returns one of the elements that satisfy the condition, i.e. like a select but guarantees that only a single element is returned, randomly selected if several elements in the collection satisfy the condition; the condition inside the "any" guarantees that the selected element "a" is the ...


4

Interesting question. The "holy grail" of the Object Constraint Language was to provide a framework that when coupled with UML allowed a tool to transform that into a concrete Object Graph / Meta Model i.e. a set of classes that already had their basic structure and constraints wired in, so that all the developer had to do was implement business methods. ...


3

You can use every items.every { it.matchesCriteria() }


2

In groovy that's very easy: def yourCollection = [0,1,"", "sunshine", true,false] assert yourCollection.any() // If any element is true or if you want to make sure, all are true assert !yourCollection.every() you can even do it with a closure assert yourCollection.any { it == "sunshine" } // matches one element, and returns true or assert ...


2

The Set(Comp) is indeed invalid. In OCLInEcore the syntax for specifying the return type is different. The thing is that the model structure definitions (classes, features, operations) have nothing to do with OCL itself. It only comes later when you define the actual logic for your invariants, derived features or operation bodies. The correct way of doing ...


2

Not sure if I really understand what do you mean by the contexts of functions. However, OCL goes beyond just invariants/pre/post condition. From the OMG OCL 2.3.1 specification [1] 7.2.1 Where to Use OCL: OCL can be used for a number of different purposes: as a query language, to specify invariants on classes and types in the class model, to specify ...


2

What about using property.type?


2

You can use the transitive closure operator, closure(), to get a list of A. Then, simply check for the non-existence of the element you don't want to see in that list.


2

What I would do: pre: not col.isEmpty() post: col -> includes(result) and col -> forAll(a | a <= result) EDIT2: I discussed this question with some OCL experts. They pointed out that it's necessary to have col -> includes(result) in the post condition. Otherwise result may be any value greater than all elements of col, but is not necessarily ...


2

The benefit of defining OCL constraints on your models is the possibility of specifying all the business rules of your domain that you cannot represent with the graphical constructs of the UML (for instance, multiplicities are constraints that can be graphically represented as part of an association definition, saying that the attribute A of class C has to ...


2

Listen to Gabriel and Stephanie, learn more SQL. You state that you want to make the code more maintainable, yet the number of developers who understand SQL is greater by far than the number of developers who understand OCL. If you leave the project tomorrow after converting this to OCL, the chances that you'd be able to find someone who could ...


2

If you are using Acceleo (your comment is suggesting that you are), you have two options: use "myOrderedSet->reverse()" provided by the Acceleo library (that's not 100% pure OCL) use something like "myOrderedSet->iterate(elem: MyType| myOrderedSet.insertAt(0, elem))" Edit: It's been a long time since I used iterate since I use reverse all the time, the ...


2

You can just use the asOrderedSet operation (if your collection is in the variable X, then that would be X->asOrderedSet()) From the OCL Standard asOrderedSet() : OrderedSet(T) An OrderedSet that contains all the elements from self, with duplicates removed, in an order dependent on the particular concrete collection type.


2

You can definitely define constraints on classes, as you said. You need to clarify what you mean with context though, because you (and your professor) may have misunderstood each other. OCL has a keyword called context that basically can refer to any UML classifiers (types, classes, interfaces, associations, datatypes, ...). The example you mention are ...


2

context Shop::checkForDuplicates(catalog:Catalog) post: result = self.customer.books->flatten()->select(book| catalog.books->contains(book) )->forEach(book| chapterNames->asSet()->size()=chapterNames->size() ) customer is a Set; books is either a Bag or a Set (depending on whether duplicate books are ...


2

As of Eclipse Juno, you can use regular expressions in OCL. The function to call on it is matches(regex), just like in Java. context Packet inv ValidIPv4 : ip.matches('\b([0-9]{1,3})\.([0-9]{1,3})\.([0-9]{1,3})\.([0-9]{1,3})\b') Source: http://help.eclipse.org/juno/index.jsp?topic=%2Forg.eclipse.ocl.doc%2Fhelp%2FCompleteOCLTutorial.html If you have a ...


2

Something missing, usually means something bad configured. Without more information I can only point you out to the OCL Help, where it explains why and how you need to do some manual registrations in order to execute OCL code in standalone mode. Taken from the help: "If you use Eclipse OCL within Eclipse you should find that the appropriate ...


2

Could it be something like that? I don't know if it's OK or not... context Server :: validMovement(namePlayer:String, movement:Movement) : boolean post : result = self.games->one(g : Game | p. players->exists(p : Player | p.name=namePlayer and p.hasTurn=true) and p.board.validMovement(movement))


2

Eclipse OCL project provides standalone usage (just a java program out of Eclipse) and there is some documentation and examples about how to do it. Specifically, see the following links about: How to programmtically create and evaluate OCL constraints and queries in java. How to use Eclipse OCL in standalone mode How to download OCL. In that wiki you ...


2

In Acceleo, all variables are final. You can use a collection to store all used values and then compute its size or you could use a Java service if you really want to use a value. I would recommend using a query to compute all the useful elements since the result of the evaluation of a query is stored in a cache, the impact on the performances will be ...


1

I´m not going to get into the discussion if the constraint itself makes sense. Just some comments to help you understand OCL in this case. Invariants are created on classes. They don´t make sense in an operation context. Probably what you want is an Operation precondition. "exists" is an operator (existential quantifier) to work on a collection. The point ...


1

For example, you can use isEmpty() context Copy::issue() : Boolean pre: not self.referenceCopy and self.borrowers->isEmpty() or count() context Copy::issue() : Boolean pre: not self.referenceCopy and self.borrowers->count() = 0 You can omit the context variable self if you want.


1

After more research, I came out with the following solutions: Question 1 The solution is to use a template class with a generic type (this class won't be instantiable according to UML standards), and to bind it with realization classes. The corresponding UML class diagram is as follows: Here, we have two usable classes IntegerInterval and RealInterval ...


1

Finally got an answer from somewhere else. I share it in case someone needs it someday. There are three possible ways to solve the problem. 1°) The first one is to remember that multiple inheritance is allowed in UML. Therefore, we can make all classes with a string attribute inherit from a WithString class, and set the OCL constraint on this parent class. ...


1

You need to compute the ordered transitive closure of the previous relationship. (self, self.previous, self.previous.previous, etc.) In OCL 2.3.1 it is self->asOrderedSet()->closure(previous) then you may extract the first dummy PlanMission (or null if there is none) by: let c:Set(PlanMission) = ...


1

Apart from minor syntactical mistakes (should be allInstances()-> ) I don't see a problem with your expression. Make sure you didn't misunderstood your teacher regarding what the constraint was supposed to constrain


1

Take a look at the Unique operator for collections. It may be a simpler way to achieve what you want.


1

Is the association a self-reference of student? Or does it have another class at the end of the association? If there is another class "Study" (as an example) and the associations would be between them with the cardinality *, then a solution could be: context Student s: inv only_one_graduate_type: ( (s.graduate -> notEmpty() implies s.undergraduate ...



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