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MATLAB on Intel systems stores floating point values as little endian. Use computer to check: >> [computerType, ~, endian] = computer computerType = PCWIN64 endian = L You can use swapbytes to convert between little an big-endian: >> num2hex(1024) ans = 4090000000000000 >> num2hex(swapbytes(1024)) ans = 0000000000009040 In R, specify ...


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You can use vectorize of operations in Octave/Matlab. Iterate over entire vector - it is really bad idea, if your programm language let you vectorize operations. R, Octave, Matlab, Python (numpy) allow this operation. For example, you can get scalar production, if theta = (t0, t1, t2, t3) and X = (x0, x1, x2, x3) in the next way: theta * X' = (t0, t1, t2, ...


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Just learn Fortran. The output of machine-translated code may well be functionally correct and suitable for compilation and execution, but it's going to be really hard to understand and maintain. (Just look at what generated code targeting a single language, like the output of a GUI builder wizard, looks like.) In particular, while Matlab is built on ...


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What you're doing in the first example in the second block you've missed out a step haven't you? Am assuming you concatenated X with a vector of one's temp=X(:,2) * temp The last example will work but can be vectorised even more to be more simple and efficient. I've assumed you only have 1 feature. it will work the same with multiple features since all ...


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This is a consequence of floating point arithmetic. Your computer cannot fully accurately represent 4/3 as a floating point binary number hence you get a rounding error. However it can fully accurately represent 10.125 in binary and hence no error. Said another way, consider the parts of your number after the decimal point. For 4/3 we have 0.333333... which ...


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If you try operating on entire columns or rows, you will see a difference. Try the following code in both MATLAB and Octave: %% Columns a = rand(n); b = zeros(n,1); tic for ii = 1:n b = b + a(:,ii); end t1 = toc %% Rows: a = rand(n); b = zeros(1,n); tic for ii = 1:n b = b + a(ii,:); end t2 = toc On my computer this gives: %% MATLAB: t1 = 0.0287 t2 ...


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Have you tried displaying a text box at each co-ordinate? Assuming x and y are co-ordinates already stored in MATLAB, you could do something like this: plot(x, y, 'b.'); for i = 1 : length(x) % x and y are the same lengths text(x(i), y(i), ['(' num2str(x(i)) ',' num2str(y(i)) ')']); end The above code will take each point in your graph and place a ...


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In the second example, Octave is interpreting 'a' as a char, converting 'a' to its ASCII representation (97) and then getting the natural logarithm. log(97) = 4.5747 In general you have two ways to call functions: as a function or as a command. E.g. save('test.txt') save test.txt When a function is used as a command, it assumes the input is a string. ...


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Your first example gives a logical vector, which can be used for logical indexing. Your second example, however, gives a double vector. Try foo = logical(foo); before a(foo,:). This is how it works in Matlab. I'm assuming it's the same in Octave.


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Power iteration is a standard way to find the dominant eigenvalue of a matrix. You pick a random vector v, then hit it with P repeatedly until you stop seeing it change very much. You want to periodically divide v by sqrt(v^T v) to normalise it. The rate of convergence here is proportional to the separation between the largest eigenvalue and the second ...


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Given λ1 = 3 the corresponding eigenvector is: | 2 1 | |x| |x| | | * | | = 3 | | => x = y | 1 2 | |y| |y| I.e. any vector of the form [x, x]', for any non-zero real number x, is an eigenvector. So [0.70711, 0.70711]' is an eigenvector as valid as [1, 1]'. Octave (but also Matlab) chooses the values such that the sum of the ...


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This works fine in my system using my own build of Octave and packages installed via pkg. From the errors message, it seems that you are using packages installed locally but at the same time, you mention installing them via Ubuntu's package manager. I'd suggest check your ~/octave/ directory and remove it if you're sticking with Ubuntu's package manager. ...


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It seems the best solution is to use the Power Iteration method, as suggested by tmyklebu. The method is to iterate x = Px; x /= sum(x), until x converges. I'm assuming convergence if the d1 norm between successive iterations is less than 1e-5, as that seems to give good results. Convergence can take a while, since the largest two eigenvalues are fairly ...


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trace(A*B') will compute the complete matrix product before using trace(). A more efficient approach would be sum(sum(A.*conj(B),2)). The inner sum computes the diagonal of the resulting matrix. A probably even more efficient approach would be doing both sums in one step via `sum((A.*conj(B))(:)). trace(A*B' + C*D') would be computed efficiently by ...


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Ranges of x and y in which to display planes: X = linspace(-100,100,10); Y = linspace(-100,100,10); [ XX, YY ] = mesh Calculating z coordinate for planes: ZZ1 = 1 - XX - YY; ZZ2 = 4/3 - 2/3 * XX + 1/3 *YY; Displaying: figure; hold on; mesh(XX,YY,ZZ1); mesh(XX,YY,ZZ2);


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If you are looking for exactly the same tranform, you may try the RODFT00 flag instead. According to docs of fftw, matlab, octave, it seems to fit, except for a 2 factor. Output of fftw may be twice the one of matlab or octave. http://www.mathworks.fr/fr/help/pde/ug/dst.html http://octave.sourceforge.net/signal/function/dst.html ...


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To expand on my comments, I will post an answer. I am no expert on this though. Firstly, running the tests in Matlab with feature accel off to disable JIT compilation returns results roughly the same as Octave's. Thus the speed increase between Matlab and Octave is due to Matlab's JIT Compilation, which must be vectorising the loop. Secondly, the reason ...


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This is called command prompt. You can set the PS1 to the empty string with: PS1("") For more info: https://www.gnu.org/software/octave/doc/interpreter/Customizing-the-Prompt.html


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I'm not aware of any syntactical differences when using matrices in Matlab/Octave. There are some general differences in syntax (comments, strings) that are described here but they don't affect the usage of matrices. There might be differences in speed. Octave is said to be slower on loops, probably because it lacks some optimizations that Matlab does but I ...


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This behavior sure does seem like there's a problem with octave's current working directory. Does the command dir or pwd also have the same problem? But you might be able to ignore all of that by addpath("C:\Users\XXXX\My Documents");


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Concur with ivarne that DataFrames is a good choice: using DataFrames timeseries1 = DataFrame( a = ["2014-03-01","2014-03-02","2014-03-03","2014-03-04","2014-03-05",], b = @data([1,2,3,4,5]) ) timeseries2 = DataFrame( a = ["2014-03-01","2014-03-02","2014-03-05","2014-03-06",], c = @data([21,22,23,24]) ) join(timeseries1, timeseries2, on=:a) ...


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This seems like a task where you DataFrames should be the tool for the job. I'm not sure how well it currently works, but the documentation suggests that there is a join() method that can do both inner and outer joins, as you request. I have seen some issues about making DataFrames more like a inMemory database, but I have not followed the discussion closely ...


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Since are using Octave, you can call Fortran code, there is no need to rewrite it. You will need to write a very simple C++ wrapper to it but Octave already provides macros to do all of the hard work. It is all documented on the manual. Actually, Octave itself calls on many fortran subroutines, so this is perfectly normal. If you want to modify it, you ...


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You can add that line to the .octaverc file. If the files does not exist, just create it on your home directory. This file is executed every time you start Octave unless you pass the -f or --norc option. You can add many other things to you .octaverc file. As an example, this is part of mine: ## use man instead of help function man (name = "help"); help ...



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