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47

You can do this, which doesn't need to create the string. It makes the output stream read out the contents of the stream on the right side (usable with any streams). outFile << ss.rdbuf();


39

This is one of my favorite tuck-away functions I keep on hand for multiple uses. #include <sys/stat.h> // Function: fileExists /** Check if a file exists @param[in] filename - the name of the file to check @return true if the file exists, else false */ bool fileExists(const std::string& filename) { struct stat buf; if ...


30

Use a reference. Note that the reference must be of type std::ostream, not std::ofstream, since std::cout is an std::ostream, so you must use the least common denominator. std::ofstream realOutFile; if(outFileRequested) realOutFile.open("foo.txt", std::ios::out); std::ostream & outFile = (outFileRequested ? realOutFile : std::cout);


27

std::ofstream creates a new file by default. You have to create the file with the append parameter. ofstream fout("filename.txt", ios::app);


20

bool fileExists(const char *fileName) { ifstream infile(fileName); return infile.good(); } This method is so far the shortest and most portable one. If the usage is not very sophisticated, this is one I would go for. If you also want to prompt a warning, I would do that in the main.


20

It is in fact const in C++11. The C++03 version is an unfortunate error.


18

These both inherit from ostream so try this: void sayHello(ostream& stream) { stream << "Hello World"; return; } Then in main, pass in the object (cout or whatever) and it should work fine.


18

This is the perfect situation to use a facet. A custom version of the codecvt facet can be imbued onto a stream. So your usage would look like this: int main() { std::locale indentLocale(std::locale::classic(), new IndentFacet()); /* Imbue std::cout before it is used */ std::cout.imbue(indentLocale); std::cout << "Line ...


18

Your stream is opening in text mode, and since 0x0A is the line feed (LF) character, that's being converted by your stream to 0x0D 0x0A, i.e. CR/LF. Open your stream in binary mode: std::ofstream fout("filename", std::ios_base::out | std::ios_base::binary); Then line ending conversions should not be performed. This is usually considered a good idea ...


16

On the line : f << "label: " << s; Because the first call to operator<< returns a std::ostream &, the second fails to compile : the left operand to the operator is not of type std::ofstream anymore and your overload is not found. You should really use the second signature, as I see no reason for restricting your type to be outputted ...


15

Of course there is. Just use reference. Like that: void foo (std::ofstream& dumFile) {} Otherwise the copy constructor will be invoked, but there is no such defined for the class ofstream.


14

It's a bit like asking why we'd want const when you can read and write from variables anyway. It allows compile-time checking, an invaluable feature for reducing bugs. It's also more self-documenting, as when looking at a declaration without the constructor call you can see whether it's an input, output or both: the parameters you mention can often only be ...


13

fprintf("%d" requires runtime parsing of the format string, once per integer. ostream& operator<<(ostream&, int) is resolved by the compiler, once per compilation.


13

This is a known discrepancy in the standard library. You can find more information about it over here: http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/lwg-defects.html#365


13

The portrayal of this as a C vs C++ thing is misleading. C++ provides std::fwrite(const void*, ...) just like C. Where C++ chooses to be more defensive is specifically the std::iostream versions. "Almost in all cases the binary data to be written to files is not char array" That's debatable. In C++ isn't not unusual to add a level of indirection in ...


12

You´ll have to specify std::ofstream::binary when opening. Else, on Windows in textfile mode, \n (0x0a) in a program will be converted to/from \r\n (0x0d 0x0a) when writing/reading the file.


11

Yes. Let your function be sayhello(std::ostream &os); Then, in the function, you can use os in place of xout. (By the way, using namespace std dumps the entire std namespace and is not recommended. A using std::cout and the like is all right, though.)


11

If you simply want to append to the end of the file, you can open the file in append mode, so any writing is done at the end of the file and does not overwrite the contents of the file that previously existed: ofstream fout("filename.txt", ios::app); If you want to overwrite a specific line of text with data instead of just tacking them onto the end with ...


11

No, not really. ifstream doesn't have a copy constructor, and if you try to return one, that means copying the instance in your function out to wherever the return needs to go. The usual workaround is to pass in a reference to one, and modify that reference in your function. Edit: while that will allow your code to work, it won't fix the basic problem. ...


9

You can call the base class implementation from the derived class implementation: void Derived::writeData(ofstream & _fstream) { // Base class writes its data Base::writeData(_fstream); // now I can write the data that is specific to this Derived class _fstream.write()//etc.. }


9

Use (*files[i]).close(); or directly files[i]->close();


9

There are too many failure reasons to list them all. Possible ones would be: the partition is finally full the user exceeds his disk quota the partition has been brutally unmounted the partition has been damaged (filesystem bug) the disk failed physically ... Do I need to check every single call of write or << to make sure it was carried out ...


9

char_type is not exactly char *, it's the template parameter of the stream that represents the stream's character type: template<typename _CharT, typename _Traits> class basic_ostream : virtual public basic_ios<_CharT, _Traits> { public: // Types (inherited from basic_ios): typedef _CharT char_type; <...> And ...


8

I assume your program behaves like standard unix tools, that when not given a file will write to standard output, and when given a file will write into that file. You can redirect cout to write into another stream buffer. As long as your redirection is alive, everything written to cout is transparently written to the destination you designated. Once the ...


8

This is going to be dependent on your system and environment. This likely to be very little difference, but there is only one way to be sure: try both approaches and measure them.


8

You're declaring a second ofstream fsTestOutput in your if statement when you create the new file. That second ofstream has scope local to your if statement, so it'll work fine within your if. However, when you leave the if statement and head back to the for loop, the new ofstream instance goes out of scope, and your code reverts back to using the original ...


7

The Tee filter from Boost.Iostreams can split an output stream into two. Here's an example inspired heavily by the one given by Johannes Schaub in his answer here. #include <sstream> #include <iostream> #include <boost/iostreams/stream.hpp> #include <boost/iostreams/tee.hpp> int main() { namespace io = boost::iostreams; ...


7

In C++, main must have one of the following two signatures: int main(); or int main(int argc, char* argv[]); It is illegal to write a main function that takes any parameters other than these, since these are typically set up either by the operating system or by the C++ language runtime. This may be the cause of your error. Alternatively, the fact ...


7

The stream will be in a failure state after you do this (outFile.fail() will be true). The text isn't stored anywhere, so no, you can't save it. If you want to store data in memory, use an std::ostringstream (from the <sstream> header) instead.



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