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63

Non-OO features that C++ has that C does not: Templates Function overloading References Namespaces You can use structs and enums without writing struct or enum before every declaration or using typedefs. Even if you don't define your own classes, using C++'s string and container classes is still often more convenient and safe to work with than c-style ...


26

It sounds like you want the inverse of Q1 times Q2. Transforming by the inverse of Q1 will rotate the object back to its original frame (the initial orientation, as you say), and then transforming by Q2 will rotate it to its new orientation. Note that the standard definition of a quaternion applies transformations in a right-to-left multiplication order, so ...


21

I'm a big fan of C who over time has become a big fan of C++. One of the big reasons for that is the STL ( the Standard Template Library ) and Boost. Between the two of them it makes it very easy to write powerful portable applications.


19

You don't need to wrap every last call to Ogre in try { ... } catch. You do it wherever you can meaningfully deal with the exception. This may be at the individual call site in some cases, or it could be in a high-level loop of some sort. If you can't deal with it meaningfully anywhere, don't catch it at all; let the debugger take over. In particular, you ...


18

The normal way to build Ogre from source: Get a new self extractor of Ogre (these instructions are for Ogre version 1.7.3) Download and install CMake Download and install the DirectX SDK Create a folder named "OGRE", in a drive that has at least 4.3GB of space. Extract the ogre source into OGRE folder. Download the Ogre dependencies and extract them to ...


14

Think of it this way QInitial * QTransition = QFinal solve for QTransition by multiplying both sides by QInitial^{-1} (^{-1} being the quaternion conjugate) QTransition = QFinal * QInitial^{-1} It's just that easy. note to @Dan Park - if you disagree with my math, please post a response to my answer, don't change the math. As far as I know, it's ...


11

One "feature" that hasn't been mentioned much (but I think is noteworthy) is that the C++ compiler community seems to be willing to go to a lot more work to produce conforming implementations. Back when the standard that eventually became C89/90 was in work, nearly every compiler vendor worked at conforming with the latest drafts of the standard, and ...


8

The accepted solution here flat out doesn't work. It will only even sort of work if the mesh density is generally high enough that no two points on the mesh are farther apart than the diameter of your collision sphere. Imagine a tiny sphere launched at short range on a random vector at a huuuge cube mesh. The cube mesh only has 8 verts. What are the odds ...


8

You should not be using RenderWindow but RenderTexture if you don't want to open a window. It works almost exactly the same as RenderWindow because it is derived from RenderTarget as well. You should have almost no trouble just switching them around with your current parameters except for changing the constructor. Please update your question with some ...


8

Why C++ is better than C? Besides the obvious list of features, in my opinion the real answer is that there's no good reason to still use C instead of C++. Even if you don't use OOP, you can use it as a better C. Even if you use just once a unique feature of C++ in your program, C++ is already a winner. On the other hand, there's no disadvantage in using ...


7

I ended up figuring this out on my own. The problem ends up being that OGRE's Mac GL backend does not honor the currentGLContext option, so the best solution is to change to SDL 1.3 (directly from Subversion, as of time of writing) and use the SDL_CreateWindowFrom call to start getting events from a window created by OGRE. It should also be noted that the ...


7

Because the creation of the ManualObject takes a bit of time I put the task onto a new thread. That's your problem right there. An OpenGL context can be active in only one thread at a time. If you call OpenGL commands from a thread which doesn't have an OpenGL context bound, all you get are errors.


6

You seem to be unaware of how to debug exceptions. Either Bring up the VS Debug/Exceptions dialog and tick the C++ Exceptions box. This will give you an opportunity (a dialog appears) to debug when an exception is thrown. or If you've built Ogre source, set a breakpoint in the Ogre::Exception constructor and when it attempts to throw one you'll break ...


6

If this is your first game application, using multi-threading to achieve your results might be more work than you should really tackle on your first game. Sychronizing a game loop and render loop in different threads is not an easy problem to solve. As you correctly point out, rendering time can greatly affect the "speed" of your game. I would suggest ...


6

One interesting option is stackless-python. This was used in the Eve-Online game.


6

References are done automatically and much safer compared to pointers, the standard library is far more extensive, templates make code extremely customizable and substantially faster and safer. C++ offers fantastic code use/reuse and organization. Also, if you don't rely much on OOP, then you're doing it wrong. There's times when objects are not appropriate, ...


6

Ok so its been a while since I found the solution to my problems unfortunately not been online so hope this helps anyone with similar issues. When creating any texture you should always make textures a size in texels 2^n * 2^m where m and n are the width and height of the texture. This was my first mistake although I did not realise it at the time. The ...


6

I found a working solution for this. First, I had to instantiate my Ogre::RenderWindow objects in windowed mode rather than full-screen mode -- full-screen mode was emulated easy enough by instantiating the Ogre::RenderWindow objects without borders like so: Ogre::NameValuePairList options; options["left"] = "0"; options["top"] = "0"; options["border"] = ...


5

The syntax is a matter of taste, Lua is like Javascript but with curly braces replaced with Pascal-like keywords. It has the nice syntactic feature that semicolons are never required but whitespace is still not significant, so you can even remove all line breaks and have it still work. As someone who started with C I'd say Python is the one with esoteric ...


5

First, you should note that ${APPLE} "does not imply that the system is Mac OS X, only that APPLE is #defined in C/C++ header files." Use IF(${CMAKE_SYSTEM_NAME} MATCHES "Darwin") to check for OS X. I don't have your build environment to test the following suggestions, but give them a try: Line 309 and 321 have a typo. It should be "${OGRE_INCLUDE_DIR}" ...


4

The Python/C API manual is longer than the whole Lua manual (including the Lua/C API). Another reason for Lua is the built-in support for coroutines (co-operative multitasking within the one OS thread). It allows one to have like 1000's of seemingly individual scripts running very fast alongside each other. Like one script per monster/weapon or so. ( Why ...


4

Jason Williams' answer shows the right track. One possible way is to introduce an independent class representing your GameObject. (Let's call it thus for the rest of the answer, even if you don't create a game) This GameObject class encapsulates all relevant aspects of your Ninja and boxes and whatever and hides the physical and graphical aspects by ...


4

The 1st questions is : how can I ensure that a user has the correct 9.0c version so that the game doesn't crash on the user's face, but instead show a message like "Go get the latest 9.0c version from there...."? The best idea is to update/install DirectX silently from Game Installer. Along with other required system components like PhysX, vcredist, ...


4

Ok so I got an answer off the Ogre3d forums from a very helpful person called bstone. It turns out that when creating my index list to create the faces I was mistakenly passing coordinates from the vertex list rather than indexes of the vertices. faces[iBufCounter] = vertices[(y*mapSize) + x]; faces[iBufCounter+1] = vertices[((y+1)*mapSize) + x]; ...


4

You may be using a libray that is changing the default precision of the FPU to single-precision. Then all floating-point operations, even on doubles, will actually be performed as single-precision operations. As a test, you can try calling _controlfp( _CW_DEFAULT, 0xfffff ); (you need to include <float.h>) before performing the calculation to see if ...


4

If you want to set a background you can do this: Create a rectangle that fill all viewport Rectangle2D* rect = new Rectangle2D(true); rect->setCorners(-1.0, 1.0, 1.0, -1.0); rect->setRenderQueueGroup(RENDER_QUEUE_BACKGROUND); rect->setBoundingBox(AxisAlignedBox(-100000.0 * Vector3::UNIT_SCALE, 100000.0 * Vector3::UNIT_SCALE)); SceneNode * node = ...


3

The memory allocator of your OgreBuildSettings.h probably doesn't reflect the one Ogre was actually built with. Change it to the one used when you built Ogre (or just play with the numbers of #define OGRE_MEMORY_ALLOCATOR. It happens when you update Ogre and forget to replace OgreBuildSettings.h in an alternative include path (maybe your project's).


3

I've only used XNA, so I can't really give you a good comparison to the others. I will say that while XNA is just a framework, TorqueX 3D is an engine. You get access to the TorqueX 2D and 3D engine binaries when you sign up to develop for XNA ($100/year). I haven't worked with the 3D engine, but I have used the 2D engine. I will say that the ...


3

There are several things to be said about multihead support in the case of OGRE3D. In my experience, a working solution is to use the source version of Ogre 1.6.1 and apply this patch. Using this patch, users have managed to render an Ogre application on a 6 monitors configuration. Personnaly, I've successfully applied this patch, and used it with the ...



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