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8

Many computer architectures store memory in "words" of several bytes each. For example, the Intel 32-bit architecture stores words of 32 bits, each of 4 bytes. Memory is addressed at the single byte level, however; therefore an address can be "aligned", meaning it starts at a word boundary, or "unaligned", meaning it doesn't. On certain architectures ...


7

An aligned memory access means that the pointer (as an integer) is a multiple of a type-specific value called the alignment. The alignment is the natural address multiple where the type must be, or should be stored (e.g. for performance reasons) on a CPU. For example, a CPU might require that all two-byte loads or stores are done through addresses that are ...


5

Definitely #2, Pandaboard is an OMAP4 platform. OMAP4 contains not only the ARM Cortex A9 (which is not likely to compete on it's own with dual core Atom), but, and this is crucial, a full C674x DSP core, both floating and fixed point mathematics. The embedded DSP core in OMAP4 is fully capable of handling 1080p H.264 decode, with some resources to spare. ...


3

This particular error is not due to CMake. Instead see the line: /home/projects/OMAP-L137/timesys/factory-current/build_armv5l-timesys-linux- uclibcgnueabi/DSPLink-1_65_01/DSPLink-1_65_01/dsplink/gpp/inc/usr/linkcfgdefs.h:824:37: error: 'MAX_DSPS' was not declared in this scope`` The problem is the missing symbol MAX_DSPS. Do a recursive grep in the ...


3

According to the error message, the code that caused this kernel panic resides at virtual address 0x7eb52754. Judging from the address (just below 0x8000000), I'm guessing this is the code segment of a kernel module - probably one of your own kernel modules. To do a root cause analyses, load your (and all other) kernel modules in the same order as they were ...


3

As Clement mentioned, the 12.0 is the frequency in MHz of the external oscillator. Core and MPU are the frequencies of the internal PLL's. The MPU is the Microprocessor Unit Subsystem. This is the actual Cortex-A8 core as well as some closely related peripherals. So your MPU is running at 1000 MHz or 1GHz. This is similar to the CPU frequency in your ...


3

Aligned addresses are those which are multiples of the access size in question. Access of 4 byte words on addresses that are multiple of 4 will be aligned Access of 4 bytes from the address (say) 3 will be unaligned access It is very likely that the _mem2 function which will work also for unaligned accesses will be less optimal to get the correct ...


3

that should have worked for you. Here is some code I dug up from way back when, did not try it on a beagleboard tonight just made sure it compiled, it had worked at one time... startup.s: .code 32 .globl _start _start: bl main hang: b hang .globl PUT32 PUT32: str r1,[r0] bx lr .globl GET32 GET32: ldr r0,[r0] bx lr hello.c : ...


3

_mem2 is more general. It'll work if ptr is aligned or not. _amem2 is more strict: it requires that ptr be aligned (though is presumably slightly more efficient). So use _mem2 unless you can guarantee that ptr is always aligned.


3

Many processors have alignment restrictions on memory access. Unaligned access either generates an exception interrupt (e.g. ARM), or is just slower (e.g. x86). _mem2 is probably implemented as fetching two bytes and using shift and or bitwise operations to make a 16-bit ushort out of them. _amem2 probably just reads the 16-bit ushort from the specified ...


3

Ok, I've found the solution on my own. As clearly told here, the file /dev/watchdog must be kept open for allowing the watchdog to fire... then the right command for causing the watchdog fire is: cat > /dev/watchdog and then type 0: after 60 seconds the board will reboot.


3

I think this error come due to not having rootfs in ext3 partition.Check your root(EXT3) partition of sd-card whether rootfs is available or not?


2

Best way to find out is to hook your DSP up to a scope and measure the frequency. Write a simple program that sits in a loop and toggles the I/O line(s).


2

From reading the questions so far, I'd say the Original Poster has substantially more knowledge of this matter than the contributors so far, and that the suspicion that the clock() is broken (or not supported, and returns an undefined result) on the DSP seems quite likely.


2

I don't know what the time base your transfering data in is, but I know the TMS32064x which is listed on the specsheet for the SDK has a very powerful DMA engine. (I'm assuming it's the orignal ZOOM OMAP34X MDK. It says it has a 64xx.) I would hope the OMAP has something simalar, use them to their fullest advantage. I would recomend setting up "ping-pong" ...


2

The OMAP3430 does not have an on board DSP, it has a IVA2+ Video/Audio decode engine hooked to the system bus and the Cortex core has DSP-like SIMD instructions. The GPU on the OMAP3430 is a PowerVR SGX based unit. While it does have programmable shaders and i don't believe there is any support for general purpose programming ala CUDA or OpenCL. I could ...


2

(If you haven't done it already, I suggest you join TI e2e community: there are many ongoing discussions about TI OMAP architecture and TI engineers overview the forums to provide answers). You could specify a device driver as built-in or module when you configure the kernel. You can load that module later on with the insmod command. That option depends on ...


2

As far as I know there is no way to do what you describe. The closest and most efficient way to do that would be rendering to an FBO, this way one could bind the texture as the color buffer and use glReadPixels to get the pixels back. This still requires reading the Framebuffers due to glReadPixels api. There are a few advantages of using FBOs over other ...


2

I've not enough repetation to comment.. But my answere to Works either way. Now the weird thing is that I can print individual characters with with uart_send('c') for example, but cannot print strings print_string(char *str){ while (*str != '\0') uart_send (*str++); } print_string("Test"); . Any thoughts on this? is: You write faster in the ...


2

Well, on OMAP you don't have OpenGL, but OpenGL-ES. And you don't link statically to OpenGL (you never do), but use whatever dynamic library is available. In the case of TI OMAPs you need the PoverVR SDK from the TI Developer Download area, which contains a OpenGL-ES implementation for the PowerVR core in the OMAP. Sadly this is a closed source binary blob ...


2

12 Mhz is the frequency of the crystal oscillator present on the board to give a time reference. A TI OMAP contains 2 cores : an ARM and a DSP. The terminology used here is not clear but it may be the frequencies of these cores. Check you datasheet to be sure.


2

When an OMAP processor is reset is first runs a boot ROM masked into the chip. One of the places this boot ROM can look for code is in a file named MLO in the first partition of an SD card. But the boot ROM only understands FAT32. See also http://omappedia.org/wiki/Bootloader_Project Other processors based on Cortex-A cores have similar but different ...


2

You may try distributed codec engine (sources at github). As an example - github again. Standard threading model can be used in the following way - one thread on ARM is working while second thread at ARM is waiting for completion of DSP job and in the end it reads data from DSP (for example a blocking process call mentioned here in video decoding api).


2

For an authoritative answer, you can try running lmbench (HowTo?) on the target of your choice. A set of results for AM37x (variant of TI OMAP3 family) is available here for reference. Also checkout this presentation that describes the latency and bandwidth of various caches configurations on an ARM Cortex A9 MP system.


1

Have you checked that the timer-module is powered and that the clock to the timer-module has been enabled? The selection of clock source is made at the power, reset, and clock management (PRCM) module (Chapter 3 of the TRM). If you haven't enabled power and configured a clock-source to your timer peripheral block in the PRCM module the timer will simply do ...


1

Enable the MMU/MPU and turn on the i-cache and d-cache so that the code is not in competition with the memory movement. Use ldmia and stmia instructions to ensure that you burst lines. Allow the graphics memory to be write-bufferable. This allows the ARM to gang writes together. You may use a HSYNC or VSYNC interrupt to flush the buffers. As per ...


1

After talking to someone about this problem, the solution is to directly write to the Dataout Register instead of using the Set/Clear Dataout registers, then all the transitions will be at the same time: #define GPIO_DATAOUT 0x13C ... MOV r4, GPIO1 | GPIO_DATAOUT ... ... //Loop the following: MAIN_LOOP: LBCO r2, CONST_PRUDRAM, r1, 4//Read pin state ...


1

but I want to know that when DMA is Working is there any chances to CPU of panda board will be able to do another task at a time ??? The purpose of DMA is to specifically transfer data between an I/O device and main memory. By design this is intended to relieve the CPU of performing this transfer, which is known as programmed I/O. Once the CPU has set ...


1

You are probably manipulating unsigned 32-bit values using signed 32-bit data types. Use unsigned 32-bit data types or 64-bit data types. Actually you may even be manipulating 64-bit values in 32-bit data types, it's hard to tell. I'd suggest using 64-bit data types.


1

The interface and functionnal clock needs to be enabled for some register to be available. I don't know for the 4430, but for the 3730, two register control the functionnal and interface clok for the GPIO banks : CM_ICLKEN_PER CM_FCLKEN_PER Look for these in the TRM of your omap, and see if you can fix your JTAG access problem with them. This not really ...



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