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247

The only difference between a class and a struct in C++ is that structs have default public members and bases and classes have default private members and bases. Both classes and structs can have a mixture of public and private members, can use inheritance, and can have member functions. I would recommend using structs as plain-old-data structures without ...


141

Purposes of Interfaces create loosely coupled software support design by contract (an implementor must provide the entire interface) allow for pluggable software allow different objects to interact easily hide implementation details of classes from each other facilitate reuse of software Analogy 1: Much like the US space shuttle, Russian Soyuz ...


108

Coupling Loose: You and the guy at the convenience store. You communicate through a well-defined protocol to achieve your respective goals - you pay money, he lets you walk out with the bag of Cheetos. Either one of you can be replaced without disrupting the system. Tight: You and your wife. Cohesion Low: The convenience store. You go there for ...


75

Go to the source! Grady Booch says (in Object Oriented Analysis and Design, page 49, second edition): Abstraction and encapsulation are complementary concepts: abstraction focuses on the observable behavior of an object... encapsulation focuses upon the implementation that gives rise to this behavior... encapsulation is most often achieved through ...


64

To add on what CesarGon has mentioned, Cohesion refers to what the class (or module) will do. Low cohesion would mean that the class does a great variety of actions and is not focused on what it should do. High cohesion would then mean that the class is focused on what it should be doing, i.e. only methods relating to the intention of the class. Example of ...


61

As everyone else notes there are really only two actual language differences: struct defaults to public access and class defaults to private access. When inheriting from them struct defaults to public inheritance and class defaults to private inheritance. (Ironically, as with so many things in C++, the default is backwards: public inheritance is by far ...


54

Interfaces are just contracts or signatures and they don't know anything about implementations. Coding against interface means, the client code always holds an Interface object which is supplied by a factory. Any instance returned by the factory would be of type Interface which any factory candidate class must have implemented. This way the client ...


45

From page 108 of Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software by Gamma, Helm, Johnson, and Vlissides. Use the Factory Method pattern when a class can't anticipate the class of objects it must create a class wants its subclasses to specify the objects it creates classes delegate responsibility to one of several helper subclasses, and you ...


45

Ask yourself what they are and why do we have them. They both are there to create instance of an object. ElementarySchool school = new ElementarySchool(); ElementarySchool school = SchoolFactory.Construct(); // new ElementarySchool() inside No difference so far. Now imagine that we have various school types and we want to switch from using ...


44

Coupling - A measure of how much a module (package, class, method) relies on other modules. It is desirable to reduce coupling, or reduce the amount that a given module relies on the other modules of a system. Cohesion - A measure of how closely related the members (classes, methods, functionality within a method) of a module are to the other members of the ...


41

Anti-patterns are certain patterns in software development that is considered a bad programming practice. As opposed to design patterns which are common approaches to common problems which have been formalized, and are generally considered a good development practice, anti-patterns are the opposite and are undesirable. For example, in object-oriented ...


33

The only time I use a struct instead of a class is when declaring a functor right before using it in a function call and want to minimize syntax for the sake of clarity. e.g.: struct Compare { bool operator() { ... } }; std::sort(collection.begin(), collection.end(), Compare());


27

It's hard to summarize in an SO answer, but I'll try. One of the challenges of designing objects is balancing thinking from an overall perspective with thinking from the perspective of an individual object. You need the overall perspective to get the computation completed, but you need the individual object perspective to effectively subdivide the logic and ...


27

The OP updated his question with several citations that he had found, namely in an article by Edward V. Berard titled, "Abstraction, Encapsulation, and Information Hiding". I am re-posting a slightly expanded and reformatted version of the OP's update, since it should be an answer in its own right. (All citations are taken from the article mentioned above.) ...


22

When should you use getters and setters? Getters and setters are great for configuring or determining the configuration of a class, or retrieving data from a model Getting the price of an item is an entirely reasonable use of a getter. That is data that needs to be available and may involve special considerations to protect the data by adding validation or ...


20

You need to read (if you have access to) Effective Java 2 Item 1: Consider static factory methods instead of constructors. Static factory methods advantages: They have names. They are not required to create a new object each time they are invoked. They can return an object of any subtype of their return type. They reduce verbosity of creating ...


19

An interface is used to describe what an implemented thing can do. So you have the possibility to treat several objects which implementing the same interface as a type of this interface. For example: public interface IMyInterface{ public void DoFirst(); public int DoSecond(); } public class A : IMyInterface{ //class has to implement DoFirst ...


19

Think of an interface as a contract between an object and its clients. That is the interface specifies the things that an object can do, and the signatures for accessing those things. Implementations are the actual behaviours. Say for example you have a method sort(). You can implement QuickSort or MergeSort. That should not matter to the client code ...


16

In my experience, interfaces are best used when you have several classes which each need to respond to the same method or methods so that they can be used interchangeably by other code which will be written against those classes' common interface. The best use of an interface is when the protocol is important but the underlying logic may be different for ...


16

It's a bit more complex than that. :-) High cohesion within modules and low coupling between modules are often regarded as related to high quality in OO programming languages. For example, the code inside each Java class must have high internal cohesion, but be as loosely coupled as possible to the code in other Java classes. Chapter 3 of Meyer's ...


15

Abstractness is a measure of the rigidity of a software system. Higher the abstraction, lower the rigidity (or greater the flexibility) and vice versa. If the components of the system depend on abstract classes or interfaces such a system is easier to extend and change than if it depended directly on concrete classes. Stability is a measure of tolerance to ...


15

public class Deck <T extends Card> Deck does not extend Card. This is a generic type annotation, and it says that a Deck can be of type T where T is a subclass of Card. This is the same as Java's collection classes, where a List of String also does not extend String (but contains String instances). This allows you to write code like: ...


15

According to Simon Peyton Jones: The language in which you write profoundly affects the design of programs written in that language. For example, in the OO world, many people use UML to sketch a design. In Haskell or ML, one writes type signatures instead. Much of the initial design phase of a functional program consists of writing type ...


13

Definitely. Let's think of a concrete example. Say we have an abstract class Animal. Say, we make some subclasses Cat, Dog, Mosquito, and Eagle. We can implement its Eat(), Breathe(), Sleep() methods of the abstract class Animal. So far, so good. Now, let's say we want to have the Fly() method for the Mosquito and Eagle classes. Since these two organisms ...


13

Abstraction is hiding the implementation details by providing a layer over the basic functionality. Information Hiding is hiding the data which is being affected by that implementation. Use of private and public comes under this. For example, hiding the variables of the classes. Encapsulation is just grouping all similar data and functions into a group e.g ...


12

Consider a student, the student's brain, and the school the student attends. The brain is a part of the student. If the student is destroyed, so is the brain. This is composition. The student has a school. The student survives the school's destruction, and vice versa. This is aggregation.


11

Read Refactoring by Martin Fowler, and apply it to your own work. It will take you through a litany of malodorous characteristics of software code that describe how to detect improperly constructed classes, and even more importantly, how to fix them.


11

From the C++ FAQ: The members and base classes of a struct are public by default, while in class, they default to private. Note: you should make your base classes explicitly public, private, or protected, rather than relying on the defaults. struct and class are otherwise functionally equivalent. OK, enough of that squeaky clean techno talk. ...


11

Increased cohesion and decreased coupling do lead to good software design. Cohesion partitions your functionality so that it is concise and closest to the data relevant to it, whilst decoupling ensures that the functional implementation is isolated from the rest of the system. Decoupling allows you to change the implementation without affecting other ...


11

Java provides a generic collection called IdentityHashMap<K,V>, which breaks Liskov substitution principle - the "L" in SOLID by intentionally violating Map<K,V>'s contract. Here is a note from the documentation of the IdentityHashMap<K,V> class: This class is not a general-purpose Map implementation! While this class implements the ...



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