Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

2

The methods of the Iterator interface (next(), hasNext()) can't simply be added to the interface. An Iterator has a state which determines the next element that would be returned by the iterator. If the Iterator methods were part of the Collection interface, you would need some additional method to reset this "built-in" iterator (in order to iterate again ...


2

It would be better to have one of those two stored as a data member, and have the other calculated from that by a member or even free function: struct Person { int dateOfBirth; }; // Simplistic and only correct for about half a year // No need for thisYear to be static or even hardcoded, just for demonstration purposes! int ageFromDateOfBirth(int ...


1

At the conceptual level: Collection represents a collection of objects. Adding methods for hasNext and next would turn it into a collection of objects along with another piece of state, a 'current object', as well as some concept of how to traverse the collection. Since these are two separate ideas, it is best to divide them into separate structures that ...


1

Simply use std::vector<Bullet> bullets to store all of your bullets. You are going to need all those objects anyway and std::vector will: amortize appending new objects allow you to shrink_to_fit if at any point the vector became too large allow you to reserve a certain number of elements at the beginning, effectively creating an empty pool of ...


1

tl;dr: ORMs manage the conversion of simple integer-based relationships in the database to instances of classes that you can work with in your code. You're confused in a couple different areas. First, and quickly, MVC is one layer of an application; specifically it is part of the presentation layer. Your business logic should be completely independent of ...


1

The memory associated with static fields are not tied to a particular instance, so they will remain in memory until the defining assembly is unloaded.


1

The approach you are using is fine. If you want to avoid cumbersome identifiers, you can make a temporary reference to keep things more succinct. For example, instead of calling: menu.objects[PAUSE].foo(); menu.objects[PAUSE].bar(); menu.objects[PAUSE].baz(); ... you could do this when necessary: Object & pause = menu.objects[PAUSE]; pause.foo(); ...


1

Iterator stores a pointer to some element inside a collection. In case of ArrayList it is an index of the underlying array. It allows you to say iterate over the collection in two separate threads simultaneously. If the pointer was a part of ArrayList, each of the threads would skip some of the elements.


1

An iterator is usually made to traversed once. In the Java collection library classes will fail if modifications are made to the underlying collection during a traversal of an iterator. BTW, this question may be more appropriate for Programmers Stack Exchange which is dedicated to theoretical programming questions.


1

Let's assume for a moment that ArrayList did have hasNext and next methods, and so your code would compile. (You'd also need another method to tell the list you wanted to start over again.) That would mean that I could only have one iteration of the list active at a time, because the list itself contains the iteration state. That's just poor design; instead, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible