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7

MainWindow.getGamePanel().getPlayer1().getName().toLowerCase().compareTo(...); This is a classic violation of the Law of Demeter, sometimes expressed as "ask, don't look." The class calling these getters has too much knowledge of the overall structure of the program, which makes it brittle. If the relationship between any of these classes changes, all ...


4

Because aField gets new memory address when you use the command aField=new MAtt(); As a result memory address of diskcount and diskindex remain uninitialized. For more check here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/73021/3923800


2

What's happening in code B is that the MURLPar constructor passes a reference to diskcount/diskindex to SetField, which within that method has the name aField. You then reassign aField with a reference to a newly created object, and you then manipulate that object. Note that aField is now referring to a completely separate object, and not whatever it was ...


2

Attributes with a double underscore (e.g. __foo) are mangled to make it harder to access them. The rules are as follows: Since there is a valid use-case for class-private members (namely to avoid name clashes of names with names defined by subclasses), there is limited support for such a mechanism, called name mangling. Any identifier of the form __spam (...


1

Note the article you link to is dated 2006. That's rather old, Javascript has changed since. Specifically, you should definitely learn what new features are added in the latest official version, the Ecmascript 6. One of the new features is the syntactic sugar for class-like definitions. http://es6-features.org


1

Don't use arrow functions when doing OO. That's because arrow functions are deliberately designed to break how this works. Instead do: IWillRememberYou.prototype.authenticate = function (req, options) { /* .. */ }; Remember, with arrow functions you basically bind this to the context where the function is defined. If you defined it outside of any ...


1

There are many ways to do this (based on the vague description) e.g.: use a,b,c in a class Triangle that has a property TriangleType But I have to say, the wording Write me a function that ... Is very misleading if OOP was what they were after. public enum TriangleType { Scalene = 1, // no two sides are the same length Isosceles = 2, // two ...


1

I suggest this design: An enumeration TriangleType. An interface like ITriangle { Type, Sides... }. 4 classes implementing ITriangle. ScaleneTriangle, IsoscelesTriangle, EquilateralTriangle, InvalidTriangle. These four class return appropriate TriangleType. A factory class like TriangleFactory and a Create method in it which takes 3 sides length ...


1

I can't use unique_ptr because I still need to access the Bar object outside of Foo. unique_ptr doesn't prevent you from accessing the object outside of Foo. If you instead meant "I still need to access the Bar object outside of Foo objects lifetime", then your reasoning is sound. In this situation Foo can not be the sole owner of the object. If ...


1

If you are designing your game in a way that a Ship needs a Gun to be created and a Gun needs a Ship before the initialisation you are going into a lot of trouble. SpriteKit already solved this kind of problem with the scene property available in SKNode. It returns the scene the current node belongs to. You could do something similar and make your life ...


1

double underscores invoke python name-mangling: >>> class Foo(object): ... def __init__(self): ... self.__private = 1 ... >>> f = Foo() >>> vars(f) {'_Foo__private': 1} You can see that it changed __property to _<classname>__property. Generally speaking, the reason python does this mangling is to allow the ...



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