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5

You can use the "short circuit" && operator: if (myObject && myObject.myProperty) { ... } If myObject is "falsey" (e.g. undefined) the && operator won't bother trying to evaluate the right-hand expression, thereby avoiding the attempt to reference a property of a non-existent object. The variable myObject must have course ...


4

Your second example is the most commonly-used way. There's no technical advantage to having "function name()" in that order. There is another alternative: function wrapper() { function helloWorld() { } function privateFunction() { } return { helloWorld: helloWorld }; } In that instance, you can also declare namespace-private functions like ...


3

Make sure that in your Part class you have the partName variable declared and that it is public and also set it in your constructor. At the end, you Part class should look like this: public class Part { public String partName; public Part(String partName, String Make, String PartNumber, String altPartNumber, BigDecimal price, int quantity, ...


3

Don't go writing classes when a function suffices. Paraphrased from the Zen of Python; Simple is better than complex. Practicality beats purity. In Python you can use many methods of programming; procedural, object-oriented, functional. All have their strength and weaknesses. But all have their uses. If you are struggling to build a pure object-oriented ...


3

You are trying to call a string. def __str__(self): return '{0} - price: {1:.2f}, inventory: {2:d}'.format(self.__description(), self.__price(), self.__inventory()) you need to either leave the "()" out: def __str__(self): return '{0} - price: {1:.2f}, inventory: {2:d}'.format(self.__description, self.__price, self.__inventory) ...


3

If you want to identify particular classes or interfaces, use instanceof: for (Object o : listeners) { if (o instanceof X) { X x = (X)o; } } However this isn't very good at all. You really want to leverage the inheritance and polymorphism of the language. My first thought is that your list should container only Listeners or subtypes e.g. ...


2

You're setting the prototype of Task after you've created your new Task. You're not changing the prototype of your already created instances by doing so, as the prototype is referenced at the instance creation. Move the Task.prototype = { assignation before the creation of your new Task. If you really want to add a function to all instances after they're ...


2

The properties should be defined as ReadOnly. Create a new instance of each property in the constructors if non are provided. Something like this: Public Class EmailMessage Public Sub New() Me.New(Nothing, Nothing, Nothing) End Sub Public Sub New([to] As EmailAddress, [from] As EmailAddress, bcc As EmailAddress) Me.m_To = ...


2

You can either declare them in the original object like you did here: var MyNamespace = { helloWorld: function() { console.log('hi!'); }, goodbyeWorld: function() { console.log('I <3 Titanic'); } } MyNamespace.helloWorld(); MyNamespace.goodbyeWorld(); Or, you can declare the namespace and then add the methods afterwards like this: // ...


2

When you do this.myName = ... in classEM, you are replacing the old myName function created by the parent with the one in classEM. So only one function exists now. Instead, you can add the myName function in the classM's prototype and inherit from it. So the program becomes like this function classM() {} // Add myName to the parent classM.prototype.myName ...


2

You can use Guava's Iterables.filter() method. It will iterate only on the subtype you want. for (YourType filteredElement : Iterables.filter(listeners, YourType.class)) { doSomething(filteredElement); }


1

There's really not a lot of good reason to try to do this: $(el).myLib.func1(); Because the this pointer when func1() executes will be myLib and you won't be able to access $(el). So, it doesn't do you a whole lot of good unless all you want is static methods. If that's what you actually want, then you can do this: $.fn.myLib = {}; $.fn.myLib.func1 = ...


1

It much depends on the logic of the parameters. But you can consider defining a binding object which has two attributes: an engine and a info. Then you move all these function on the binding object.


1

Your ListenerManager should either return a java Iterator, or a filtered Collection (or List). Don't rebuild a iterator concept on your own. Especially having a begin and next on your manager class will introduce unnecessary states there. With Java 8, your ListenerManager can easily be writte as: public class ListenerManager { private final ...


1

I run this procedure: Sub TestClones() Dim temp_cat As class_category Set temp_cat = New class_category Dim temp_cat1 As class_category Set temp_cat1 = New class_category Dim temp_stat1 As class_stat Set temp_stat1 = New class_stat Dim temp_stat As class_stat Set temp_stat = New class_stat 'Clone some stats fine - this works temp_stat1.name = "stat name" ...


1

Use number generator as class variable from itertools import count class NewPilight(object): nums = count() def __init__(self): self.num = self.nums.next() print "Pilight {self.num} created".format(self=self) Then using in code: >>> pl1 = NewPilight() Pilight 0 created >>> pl2 = NewPilight() Pilight 1 created ...


1

class NewPilight: def __init__(self, number): self.number = number print "Pilight" + number + " created" for x in range(5): NewPilight(x) if you need to keep objects: all_pilights = [] for x in range(5): all_pilights.append( NewPilight(x) ) and now you have access to objects as print all_pilights[0].number print ...


1

You should move the definition of Task and its prototype methods before the initial .on call. This will incidentally fix the problem identified by @dystroy whereby you're trying to set the prototype of Task after creating an instance of it. As written the Task function is recreated every time the click handler is invoked, and therefore the Task objects ...


1

In your question you are missing self; def _getItemName(self, item): str = "" for c in item: if c!= '(': str += c else: break return str def getCertainItemsByName(self, key, name): foundItems = [] for item in self.itemMap[key]: if self._getItemName(item) == name: ...



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