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7

You can embed other interfaces inside an interface, which gives you basicaly the same benefits: A Good Example is the ReadWriteCloser in the io package: http://golang.org/pkg/io/#ReadWriteCloser It embeds a Reader, a Writer and a Closer interface.


4

The default modifier is also called 'package-private', meaning only classes in the same package can access it.


4

In both C++ and Java the modifier itself does not directly affect performance: it is there during the compilation stage to enforce separation of concerns, but there is no trace of the modifier in the compiled (object) code. However, using accessor and mutator functions to refer to a member variable will in theory impose some minor performance penalties. Even ...


3

This could be indicative of 2 problems the services to inject are too fine-grained (for example, if you have a service to create a Foo, and a different one to update a Foo and a third one to delete a Foo), leading to many dependencies. or, more probably, the object using the service is too coarse-grained, and has too many responsibilities. For example, if ...


3

If the code for those two methods will always be the same or mostly the same, you could create another abstract class (ex: WebObjectReadWrite) that inherits from WebObject and implements the interface. public abstract class WebObjectReadWrite : WebObject, IReadable, IWritable { // Could be made virtual if some subclasses need to overwrite default ...


2

Your example will not print anything, because you don't call the class. Try this class Mother{ public function __construct($field,$val){ $this->field = $field; $this->val = $val; } public function set(){ return array('val'=>$this->val, 'field'=>$this->field, ...


2

private - Only the class itself can access it package-private - No modifier is assigned. Only classes in the same package can access it


2

You can get a direct reference to Superclass.somemethod: Superclass.somemethod.call @ I don’t think it’s possible (or necessary) to do it without naming Superclass.


1

First problem is that you are nesting your classes like russian dolls. You shouldn't have your Abstract class both contain model/view/helper, and be the parent of model/view/helper. I'd caution against using extension just to ensure a class is in-scope. Generally you can think of it this way: use extension when your class has shared behaviors or properties ...


1

"I considered building a "service container" object" Like you noticed already, that just shifts the problem somewhere else, but doesn't really solve it. There is a similar design pattern, commonly called "Parameter Object"… but I don't think it truly applies here. According to the article referenced in the previous sentence, it applies only when you ...


1

The reason Eclipse issues the warning only for private members is because that's the only situation in which Eclipse can determine with certainty whether the member is unused or not. Eclipse only knows about the code that exists in the same workspace, so it can't determine if public, protected, or "default" visible members are used by other code outside the ...


1

If a class has no modifier (the default, also known as package-private), it is visible only within its own package. So the variable have a chance to use in other classes. Where as private means you can use it only in the same class. If you are not using it in the same class, there is no use of it at all and your IDE is telling the same.


1

The reason why you cannot access $this->attributeSettings is that your are in a static method. So you aren't in the context of an object. public static function parentGetAd($obj) If you are declaring the method like this public function parentGetAd($obj) { } you should be able to access $this->attributeSettings.


1

I think it's better to communicate between the mainwindow and other dialogs through the signal-slot way. In your ZoneManager class, define: settextsignal= pyqtSignal(str) In your Ui_rga_sessionDialog class, define: @pyqtSlot(str) def textUpdate(self, rga): self.rgaSessionText.setText(rga) Then in your cookie_find method, after initializing the ...


1

There are several reasons why you want to create a class: Strong typing leverages the compiler to ensure correctness. Every class that encapsulates data is like a contract. You can imagine how's used by examining the class. You force the guy after you to read how it works. It is simpler to read class properties and image its utility. It is a sign a bad ...


1

The cleanest way to do what you are asking is to implement protected helper methods within your base class that decompose the problem of "a lot of duplication" into smaller pieces that can be composed in your concrete method implementations, like this: public abstract class WebObject { protected void SetTextImpl() { /* Implementation */ } protected ...



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