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4

You asked: Would this method behavior be polymorphic if I handle all the instances using some kind of interface ISomeClass pointer? Assuming the interface itself doesn't provide such virtual method. If the interface does not provide such a virtual method, you can't expect polymorphic behavior. It'll be better to implement foo in Implementation1 and ...


4

You want to call $user->username not $user->$username. <?php require_once 'core/init.php'; $user = DB::getInstance()->get('users', array('username', '=', 'alex')); if(!$user->count()) { echo 'No User'; } else { foreach($user->results() as $user) { echo $user->username, '<br>'; } }


4

The second snippet shows an anonymous inner class that extends Counter. It does not define a constructor. You can't define a method inside of a constructor. Also you can't define a constructor for an anonymous inner class.


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You're looking at an anonymous class derived from a Counter. The body of the derived class is contained within the braces. The default constructor of Counter is being called (you can't do anything else for an anonymous class). The count() method is being overridden. The above is more commonly performed with interfaces, and provides Java with something ...


3

You can use a pattern like this: abstract public class B { /** Override to implement the subclass logic */ abstract protected SomeClass reallyCalculateStuff(); /** The public API method to be called by clients of the class */ final public SomeClass calculateStuff() { executeSharedCode(); return reallyCalculateStuff(); } ...


2

Lines 237-246 are: if(thisApt.getAptRentalDate() == 0) { System.out.println("Apartment " + theAptID + " is available. Returning!"); return; } else { System.out.println("Apartment " + theAptID + " is rented out. Returning!"); return; } This is guaranteed to return. The output is different depending on the result of ...


2

I realise there already are 2 workarounds but I thought answering your original question was worth giving a shot due to the amount of views this question is receiving. The answer to Is it possible to have multiple arguments in the Let Property in VBA? is YES! It's possible. First let's talk about the GET property. Consider this being the Class1 ...


2

You can always declare a variable in the parent scope: var myFunction = function(foo){ var func = this; this.foo = foo; this.bar = { bar: function(){ return func.foo; } } } var f = new myFunction('foo'); alert(f.bar.bar());


2

Python classes don't declare object attributes, they are stored in per-instance dictionaries. The Edge object only happens to start with three attributes, source, sink, and capacity. Later it gains a new attribute, redge. This is standard in many scripting languages, Python included. Having said that, do note that the practice of adding attributes later is ...


2

You are free to assign new attributes to an existing user-defined object with: obj.prop = value Once assigned, they exist. You can see that the __init__ method does the same thing: it just assigns attributes, and then they exist.


2

The code sets the redge attributes: edge = Edge(u,v,w) redge = Edge(v,u,0) edge.redge = redge redge.redge = edge From there on out both the edge and redge objects do have an redge attributes. In other words, in Python you are free to add attributes to instances anywhere in the code, you are not limited to the class definition or the methods on the class ...


2

You're doing new A() and then separately you're doing new B(). You have two entirely independent object instances. It doesn't matter that one instantiation happens in the constructor of A, that's entirely irrelevant. It also doesn't matter that B extends A. You have two independent objects, and object instances do not share data implicitly, which is what you ...


1

There are several ways to do this, but I'd probably give the parent a createChild method that creates a new node, passing itself as the parent, and adds this child to itself before returning it. You imply in the question that having a preexisting parent is difficult for some reason, but if you're making a tree, you ought to know whose parents are whose. If ...


1

This sounds like an ideal job for AOP - Aspect Oriented Programming. Look at AspectJ for more details. You can create an aspect that does the logging you need, and use pointcuts to select which methods in the Controllers you want/need to advise. If you are using Spring, you can use Spring AOP instead of using the full AspectJ library.


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I haven't tested this, but how about using offsetof() along these lines: #include <stddef.h> static void tmatrix_set_field(struct tmatrix *tm, double *vals[], const size_t f_offset) { for (int i = 0; i < tm->rows; ++i) for (int j = 0; j < tm->cols; ++j) *(double *)(((char ...


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You can reduce some of the redundant logic by using functions that set one entry of a struct tm. You can use those functions in the higher level functions. typedef void (*set_matrix_data_function)(struct tmatrix *tm, double *data[], int i, int j); void set_matrix_price(struct tmatrix *tm, double *data[], int i, int j) { tm->entries[i][j].price = ...


1

When creating a new programme is it best to create all of my functions within a global variable/object or to create them all separate. This is kind of opinion based, but I'll give you a good reason for creating all your properties inside a global object: you won't pollute the namespace. That means, you won't be creating a lot of global objects, that ...


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You should find out the combinations which are possible for each form. Worst case senario you would be creating 4 interfaces for A, B, C, D and then make couple ones which implements some of those 4. Something like Interface IAB : IA, IB



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