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6

They should appear in your OPAM prefix. I get: $ ls $(opam config var prefix)/lib/pkgconfig gmp.pc mirage-xen-ocaml-bindings.pc mirage-xen-posix.pc libminios-xen.pc mirage-xen-ocaml.pc openlibm.pc mirage-xen-minios.pc mirage-xen.pc (you may have fewer; mirage-xen.pc is the important one) Assuming they're there, check the ...


5

unix library is not linked by default, so you need to pass some linking flags, to make it work, e.g., ocamlc unix.cma fork.ml -o fork If you don't want to know anything about cma, you can use ocamlbuild, instead of ocamlc: ocamlbuild -lib unix fork.native Or even more general ocamlbuild -pkg unix fork.native The latter (with pkg option) would be ...


5

Chances are that your version of mirage-xen is out of date. You can update it via OPAM by: opam update -u opam info mirage-xen Make sure that you have mirage-xen version 2.1.1 or greater (the latest as of this comment is 2.1.3). If you don't pick up the upgrade, then you may have a local Git checkout of the central package database. Confirm this by ...


5

It can't be really clean with respect to system libraries. Otherwise you need to start your own VM or some other container. But with respect to OCaml environment, you can achieve your goal with opam file in the root of your project. After you've described all your dependencies (including system one) in it, you can pin your project, and this will install all ...


5

You would probably define a module type to abstract over all the implementations. e.g. module type DB = sig type t type results val execute : t -> string -> results ... end Then you would write your code to take an implementation of this module type as an argument: module MyProg (D : DB) = struct let run db = let r = ...


5

Use opam pin. Put the branch name after a #, e.g. to use my "checksum" branch of the OCaml tcpip library instead of the upstream one: $ opam pin tcpip https://github.com/talex5/mirage-tcpip.git#checksum


5

In opam you can have several installations of the same compiler: opam switch -A 4.02.1 proj1 opam switch -A 4.02.1 proj2 will create two separate independent stacks for each project. You may also find these commands useful: opam switch export opam switch import


4

First of all it is not recommended to install it system wide. But if you still want, then this are the steps: sudo brew install opam # installs opam executable system-wide sudo mkdir -p /opt/opam # create a home for opam sudo opam init --root=/opt/opam --comp=4.02.1 eval $(opam config env) # activate the environment ocaml # run ocaml to make sure, ...


4

So, first of all your don't have any active targets in your _oasis file. What I mean, is that OASIS is about building exectuables and libraries. You haven't described either. That means, that your BuildDepends doesn't have any effect, since it has only sense for Library and Executable entries. So, a first approximation would be the following: OASISFormat: ...


4

Installing something on your system doesn't make it automatically visible for the compiler, this is true not only for OCaml, but for most conventional systems, like C or C++ to name a few. That means that you need to pass some flags to the compiler, or to write Makefiles, or to use some project management systems. In OCaml we have quite a mature ...


3

opam will try to keep in sync downloaded package with the upstream one. That means, that if package is in local cache and it doesn't differ from the upstream package, then it wouldn't be downloaded. If you want to change source code locally, then you need to pin the package. Other option is to create your own repository and add it to your opam. Your local ...


3

I am using Ubuntu 14.04 on a 64bit machine. I ditched the apt-get versions of ocaml: sudo apt-get remove --purge ocaml ocaml-base-nox ocaml-compiler-libs \ ocaml-interp ocaml-native-compilers \ ocaml-nox campl4 ocaml-base ocaml-docs opam Then I installed opam from source according to the ...


3

OCamlBrowser is rather legacy and you need manually specify all the include directories. For code browsing, ~/.opam/<switch>/lib/* dirs are not sufficient since they usually lack source codes (.ml and .mli's). You should use the build directories, ~/.opam/<switch/build/packagename/... instead, keeping the source code of the installed OPAM ...


3

Forget about the --build-doc for now. Your best bet may be to consult the doc field a package's opam file e.g.: > opam info -f doc uutf http://erratique.ch/software/uutf/doc/Uutf A new documentation system for opam based on the cmti files installed by packages is being worked on right now (see https://github.com/dsheets/codoc). So all this will improve ...


2

(as I'm asked to answer my own question...) To use system toplevel ocamlmktop -o llvmtop llvm.cma -cc g++ Then launch llvmtop, you can use llvm bindings after open Llvm. I haven't found an equivalent for utop yet.. To use utop Thanks to the utop documentation here create a myutop_main.ml file: let () = UTop_main.main () create a custom utop with ...


2

Which packages did you install? The documentation at http://opam.ocaml.org/doc/manual/dev-manual.html is a bit scarce, but based on that I'd expect that only packages providing a build-doc target will indeed produce some documentation if requested to through -d or OPAMBUILDDOC. grep -e build-doc $(opam config var root)/packages/*/*/opam on my installation ...


2

Actually the answer is already contained in the OPAM output. Just to clarify, you're using system compiler, i.e., a compiler that is already installed on your operating system (using macports or brew). That means, that camlp4 being de facto a part of compiler, is needed to be installed from the system too. So, you need either install it using your package ...


2

I'm not sure what goes wrong on your installation, maybe you shouldn't install ocaml-findlib as they may conflict in some manner. I will look at this later. Currently, the following works $ sudo port install ocaml ocaml-camlp4 opam $ opam init $ opam install ocamlfind This will lead to a working installation: $ ocamlfind query camlp4 ...


1

New versions of the coq:io and coq:io:system libraries were just released. Run: opam update opam upgrade to make sure you have coq:io:system in version at least 2.3.0. Now Extraction.launch should be available. System.effects has been replaced by System.effect.


1

This command eval 'opam config env' is almost assuredly a typo and was supposed to be eval `opam config env` though using $(...) instead is the modern equivalent and avoids this font-fact confusion eval $(opam config env) That being said that just sets the environment variables in the current shell session (and exports them for use by processes run ...


1

It turns out that (as the error message suggests), this particular package seems to depend on ruby. I was able to finish the installation after installing ruby with sudo apt-get install ruby.


1

There is no such facility, as opam allows packages to install their files virtually everywhere. But in general structure is quite simple and most packages respect it: Each installed package has its own subfolder in lib, etc, doc and share. For each package opam creates an entry install/<package-name>.install that may contain files that this package ...


1

You can remove it with the following entry in the remove field ["rm" "-f" "%{bin}%/git-lfs-server"]


1

As stated here by samoth: Normally this issue does not exist anymore if you are not using the system compiler. If you are using the system compiler, you can modify you ~/.ocamlinit to load $OCAML_TOPLEVEL_PATH as done in https://github.com/OCamlPro/opam/blob/master/shell/dot_ocamlinit So you can either use a different switch or modify your ...


1

If you're on a Unix-like system you can redirect the standard output to "/dev/null". Something like this might work: let nullout = open_out "/dev/null" in Unix.dup2 (Unix.descr_of_out_channel nullout) Unix.stdout Here's a session showing that it works (at least for me on OS X): $ ocaml OCaml version 4.01.0 # #load "unix.cma";; # Sys.system "echo ...


1

brew install opam opam init --comp=4.02.1 eval `opam config env` ocaml Update: Sometimes brewed opam can fail with Illegal Instruction, in that case you need to reinstall opam from sources: brew reinstall --build-from-source opam Also, you need a working toolchain, i.e., compiler, autotools and other developer tools. You can try to install it using ...


1

OPAM uses %{prefix}%, not ${prefix}$. You can see the use of prefix in Creating OPAM Packages part of the docs.


1

According to https://github.com/realworldocaml/book/wiki/Installation-Instructions: 14.04 [Trusty] comes with recent versions of ocaml and opam. No PPA needed. The instructions worked for me in a Trusty VM.



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