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60

An "opaque type" is a type where you don't have a full definition for the struct or class. In C, C++ and Objective-C, you can tell the compiler that a type will be defined later by using a forward declaration: // forward declaration of struct in C, C++ and Objective-C struct Foo; // forward declaration of class in C++: class Bar; // forward declaration ...


38

My vote is for the third option that mouviciel posted then deleted: I have seen a third way: // foo.h struct foo; void doStuff(struct foo *f); // foo.c struct foo { int x; int y; }; If you really can't stand typing the struct keyword, typedef struct foo foo; (note: get rid of the useless and problematic underscore) is acceptable. But ...


15

You already have the typedef in your header, so include that and define struct foo in the implementation without the typedef. foo.h: typedef struct foo foo; foo *create_foo(...); delete_foo(foo *f); foo.c: #include <foo.h> struct foo { int implementation; }; /* etc. */


13

You can use the _alloca function. I believe that it's not exactly Standard, but as far as I know, nearly all common compilers implement it. When you use it as a default argument, it allocates off the caller's stack. // Header typedef struct {} something; int get_size(); something* create_something(void* mem); // Usage handle* ptr = ...


12

An opaque type is a type that "wraps" lower-level types, and is often used when either the underlying implementation is complex, or the user simply does not need to know about the inner workings. Apple has a good page on opaque types here: ...


7

One way would be to add something like #define MODULE_HANDLE_SIZE (4711) to the public module.h header. Since that creates a worrying requirement of keeping this in sync with the actual size, the line is of course best auto-generated by the build process. The other option is of course to actually expose the structure, but document it as being opaque and ...


7

There are no gotcha's; that form is preferred exactly because of type safety. No, alignment is not an issue here. The pointer itself has a known alignment, and the alignment of the object it will point at is only of concern to the library implementation, not the user.


5

6.5 Expressions [...] 6 The effective type of an object for an access to its stored value is the declared type of the object, if any.87) If a value is stored into an object having no declared type through an lvalue having a type that is not a character type, then the type of the lvalue becomes the effective type of the object for that access ...


4

First of all, your typedef is wrong: typedef struct foo foo_t; (and so it your main, otherwise the compiler will catch the assignments to structures). For opaque types it is customary to do something like: typedef struct foo *foo_t;. Otherwise your toe wouldn't be a pointer in the example you posted (that's why you had to pass it with &). Considering ...


4

In C++, simply provide functions Foo foo; // C++ object we want to access Foo &foo_factory(); // C++ function we want to call extern "C" void * get_foo() // extern "C" so C can call function { return (void *) & foo; } // cast it to an opaque void * so C can use it extern "C" void * create_foo() { return (void *) & foo_factory(); } ...


4

Your destructor works fine because the (empty) body of the destructor is in the C source file with access to the full definition of Impl. The move constructor and move assignment however are defaulted (defined) in the header with NO definition of Impl. What you can do is C(C&&); in the header and C::C(C&&) = default; in the source file.


4

Assuming you never need to dereference the pointer, then you can use an opaque type pointer if you know the struct tag name for it: typedef struct FOO FOO; You can now create FOO * variables, and use them. And you probably could find the structure tag from the header file, but you should be aware that the library owners could change it at any time. It ...


4

Just use sfinae. template<int N, typename = void> class Test { int a; int b; }; template<int N> class Test<N, typename std::enable_if<(N > X)>::type> { int a; };


3

One normal way to hide the "implementation" in C++ world is by Pimpl/Handle-body/bridge idiom. Instead of exposing your class A to user of your API, have a handle class that expose only what you want: In A.h class AImpl; // forward declaration class A { private: AImpl* impl; public: foo(); bar(); } Then have your actual implementation in ...


3

The way to use opaque pointers is to forward declare the classes you need to use so you don't need to include their definitions. Since you're not including B.h the clients of your library won't be polluted by their definitions. // In A.h class B; class A { private: B* opaque; };


3

One solution if to create a static pool of struct handle_t objects, and provide then as neceessary. There are many ways to achieve that, but a simple illustrative example follows: // In file module.c struct handle_t { int foo; void* something; int another_implementation_detail; int in_use ; } ; static struct handle_t ...


3

You can force the alignment with max_align_t and you can avoid the strict aliasing issues using an array of char since char is explicitly allowed to alias any other type. Something along the lines of: #include <stdint.h> struct opaque { union { max_align_t a; char b[32]; // or whatever size you need. } u; }; If you want ...


2

I don't have any problem with the following minimal sample: struct ADSR_opaque; @interface LoopyPulser : NSObject { struct ADSR_opaque* env; } @end If you include the header in plain Objective-C files (not Objective-C++), you have to add struct. Alternatively use typedefs: struct ADSR_opaque_; typedef struct ADSR_opaque_ ADSR_opaque; @interface ...


2

It's a future-declared structure. For example: typedef struct CFBundle *CFBundleRef; Without the actual definition of "struct CFBundle", your code cannot access anything within a CFBundleRef pointer. This is opaque.


2

Unfortunately, I think the typical way to deal with this problem is by simply having the programmer treat the object as opaque - the full structure implementation is in the header and available, it's just the responsibility of the programmer to not use the internals directly, only through the APIs defined for the object. If this isn't good enough, a few ...


2

The problem is that here: typedef struct stack_gt* stack_gt; you are giving stack_gt a different type, while this works fine: typedef struct stack_gt* stack_gtB; clang gives us a nicer error message: error: typedef redefinition with different types ('struct stack_gt *' vs 'stack_gt') This is covered in the draft C++ standard section 7.1.3 The ...


2

As described, your handling of RSI_CHANNEL is correct. Declaring it as Pointer is the appropriate action. To make type safety stronger you could define a distinct type rather than an alias: Type RSI_CHANNEL = type Pointer; If the port parameter is really WORD then that maps to Word in Delphi. As to your problem, it lies elsewhere. The translation of ...


2

In C# has two levels of granularity for information hiding. The most basic one is the class itself: this is the scope that you get when you declare a member private. This is not sufficient for your purposes, because the node and the list are different classes. Next up is the level of the assembly, which is designated using the internal keyword. This is ...


2

I can propose you to use interface for your node values(or least derived class) and pass it through the app, but you List will try to cast it to use advanced features: public interface INode { void DoPublic(); } // As it is pointed by @xmomjr internal class Node : INode { public void DoPublic(){} public void DoHidden(){} } public class MyList ...


2

What about public interface INode { string Name { get; } } public class List { private class Node : INode { public string Name { get; set; } public Node Next { get; set; } } private List<Node> _items = new List<Node>(); public INode GetItemAt(int index) { return _items[index]; } ...


2

The .h file only has the declaration of the struct and the typedef. typedef struct list * List; That doesn't give any clues as to what the members of the struct are. They are "hidden" in the .c file. When the compiler compiles bal.c, it has no way of knowing that struct list has a member value. You can resolve this in couple of ways: Put the definition ...


2

You are returning the stack_t as value, but the return type of your stack_new function is stack, which is typedef struct stack_t* stack. You need to return the pointer - change the allocation of stack_t from stack to heap by use malloc for dynamic allocation. Don't remember to free() the stack when not needed anymore, because it is now dynamically allocated. ...


2

What you desire is some kind of equivalent of the C++ private access control in C. As you know, no such equivalent exists. The approach you give is approximately what I would do. However, I would make the opaqueType opaque to the inner components implementing the type, so I would be forced to cast it to the real type within the inner components. The forced ...


2

B. ( There is no undefined behavior with the code you presented. ) The function call void FOO_work(const FOO_Handle fooHandle); is equivalent to void FOO_work(struct FOO_Obj* const fooHandle); Variable fooHandle in the function will becode a const pointer to a non-const struct FOO_Obj object. You will not be able to add the const qualifier to ...



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