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33

Summary: When feeding UTF-8 to Nokogiri through open-uri, use open(...).read and pass the resulting string to Nokogiri. Analysis: If I fetch the page using curl, the headers properly show Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 and the file content includes valid UTF-8, e.g. "Genealogía de Jesucristo". But even with a magic comment on the Ruby file and ...


31

I think this gem does what you want https://github.com/sdsykes/fastimage FastImage finds the size or type of an image given its uri by fetching as little as needed


28

Wouldn't be better to use send_file instead? send_file Rails.root.join("public", "file.gif"), type: "image/gif", disposition: "inline"


21

You can do the same without "open-uri": require 'net/http' require 'uri' def open(url) Net::HTTP.get(URI.parse(url)) end page_content = open('http://www.google.com') puts page_content


20

Unfortunately open-uri only supports the GET verb. You can either drop down a level and use net/http, or use rest-open-uri, which was designed to support POST and other verbs. You can do gem install rest-open-uri to install it.


19

You need a tool like Mechanize. From it's description: The Mechanize library is used for automating interaction with websites. Mechanize automatically stores and sends cookies, follows redirects, can follow links, and submit forms. Form fields can be populated and submitted. Mechanize also keeps track of the sites that you have visited as a ...


18

I was having the same problem and the Iconv approach wasn't working. Nokogiri::HTML is an alias to Nokogiri::HTML.parse(thing, url, encoding, options). So, you just need to do: doc = Nokogiri::HTML(open(link).read, nil, 'utf-8') and it'll convert the page encoding properly to utf-8. You'll see Ragù instead of Rag\303\271.


17

I thought someone would just know, but I guess it's not commonly done with open-uri. Here's the ugly version that neither checks for privacy, expiration, the correct domain, nor the correct path: h1 = open("http://www.w3.org/") h2 = open("http://www.w3.org/People/Berners-Lee/", "Cookie" => h1.meta['set-cookie'].split('; ',2)[0]) Yes, it ...


17

According to the documentation, you can pass a hash of http headers as the second argument to open: open("http://www.ruby-lang.org/en/", "User-Agent" => "Ruby/#{RUBY_VERSION}", "From" => "foo@bar.invalid", "Referer" => "http://www.ruby-lang.org/") {|f| # ... }


16

This looks like a bug in URI, and uri-open, HTTParty and many other gems make use of URI.parse. Here's a workaround: require 'net/http' require 'open-uri' def hopen(url) begin open(url) rescue URI::InvalidURIError host = url.match(".+\:\/\/([^\/]+)")[1] path = url.partition(host)[2] || "/" Net::HTTP.get host, path end end resp = ...


16

You could try something along the lines of require 'open-uri' smth.css.each do |item| begin open('item[:name]', 'wb') do |file| file << open('item[:href]').read end rescue => e case e when OpenURI::HTTPError # do something when SocketError # do something else ...


14

Iconv require 'iconv' i = Iconv.new('UTF-8','LATIN1') a_with_hat = i.iconv("\xc2")


13

The reason they look like they perform similar tasks is OpenURI is a wrapper for Net::HTTP, Net::HTTPS, and Net::FTP. Usually, unless you feel you need a lower level interface, using OpenURI is better as you can get by with less code. Using OpenURI you can open a URL/URI and treat it as a file. See: ...


12

Update If you are using omniauth-facebook please follow deivid's answer. Another way to solve this issue is to replace http with https. In that way it will redirect from https to https and you won't get a redirection forbidden error. Example > url = auth.info.image => "http://graph.facebook.com/672086173/picture?type=square" > avatar_url ...


11

Ruby Standard Library to the rescue: require 'uri' user_text = URI.escape(user_text) url = "http://example.com/#{user_text}" result = open(url).read See more at the docs for the URI::Escape module. It also has a method to do the inverse (unescape)


11

I actually think the cleanest way of handling this is directly requesting the avatar throught https. To do that, just use https://graph.facebook.com/672086173/picture?type=square instead of http://graph.facebook.com/672086173/picture?type=square If you're using omniauth-facebook, you'll need to specify secure_image_url: true in your omniauth ...


10

You need to add a "Cookie" header. I'm not sure if open-uri can do this or not, but it can be done using Net::HTTP. # Create a new connection object. conn = Net::HTTP.new(site, port) # Get the response when we login, to set the cookie. # body is the encoded arguments to log in. resp, data = conn.post(login_path, body, {}) cookie = ...


10

The embed.ly api returns a 404 if the specified resource(video/picture) doesn't exist. OpenURI handles this as an exception. To catch the error you could do something like this: task :embedly => :environment do require 'json' require 'uri' require 'open-uri' Video.all.each do |video| begin json_stream = ...


10

See this Ruby bug report for a discussion of why you're experiencing this issue. See this gist for a monkey patch to OpenURI to allow "unsafe" redirects.


9

Open-URI is convenient, but that ease of use means they're removing the access to a lot of the configuration details the other HTTP clients like Net::HTTP allow. It depends on what version of Ruby you're using. For 1.8.7 you can use the Timeout module. From the docs: require 'timeout' begin status = Timeout::timeout(5) { getresult = open(cstr, ...


9

Is there a reason that you cannot save the file to public/_ctrack.gif, remove the route, and let the underlying web server serve the image? If you need to process the image from disk, just use open on the local filename: send_data open("#{Rails.root}/path/to/file.gif", "rb") { |f| f.read } ....... The rb sets the file to open and binary modes.


9

Nokogiri does not retrieve the page, it asks OpenURI to do it with an internal read on the StringIO object that Open::URI returns. require 'open-uri' require 'zlib' stream = open('http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/France') if (stream.content_encoding.empty?) body = stream.read else body = Zlib::GzipReader.new(stream).read end p body Here's what you can ...


9

require 'open-uri' require 'net/http' params = {'param1' => 'value1', 'param2' => 'value2'} url = URI.parse('http://thewebsite.com/thepath') resp, data = Net::HTTP.post_form(url, params) puts resp.inspect puts data.inspect It worked for me :)


9

The expression open("URL for zipped file", "rb") returns StringIO, not String. For getting content of StringIO it's necessary to call method read string = open(url).read()


9

This initializer in my rails app seems to make URI.parse work at least: # config/initializers/uri_underscore.rb class URI::Generic def initialize_with_registry_check(scheme, userinfo, host, port, registry, path, opaque, query, fragment, parser = DEFAULT_PARSER, ...


9

URI has an old-fashioned idea of what an url looks like. Lately I'm using addressable to get around that: require 'open-uri' require 'addressable/uri' class URI::Parser def split url a = Addressable::URI::parse url [a.scheme, a.userinfo, a.host, a.port, nil, a.path, nil, a.query, a.fragment] end end resp = open("http://sub_domain.domain.com") ...


8

I'd also really recommend rest-client. It's a great base for writing an API client.


8

Use .meta on the virtual filehandle: open('http://google.com'){|f| pp f.meta } {"x-frame-options"=>"SAMEORIGIN", "expires"=>"-1", "p3p"=> "CP=\"This is not a P3P policy! See http://www.google.com/support/accounts/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=151657 for more info.\"", "content-type"=>"text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1", "date"=>"Mon, 17 ...


7

When you say "looks like this," are you viewing this value IRB? It's going to escape non-ASCII range characters with C-style escaping of the byte sequences that represent the characters. If you print them with puts, you'll get them back as you expect, presuming your shell console is using the same encoding as the string in question (Apparently UTF-8 in this ...


7

Typically, one would simply require the module cgi, then use CGI::escape(str). require 'cgi' require 'open-uri' escaped_page = CGI::escape("Thor_Industries,_Inc.") url = "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/#{escaped_page}" f = open(url) However, this doesn't seem to work for your particular instance, and still returns a 403. I'll leave this here for reference, ...



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