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You can try yourself by increasing the threshold. Here You are finding biggest contour on thresholded image, so display thr just after threshold() using imshow() and see what going on , and how it's look like. See the result by increasing the threshold to little higher value. threshold(thr, thr,100, 255,THRESH_BINARY); //Threshold the gray Threshold ...


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I solved the problem by adding opencv_ffmpeg.dll to the c:/python27/ folder and changing it's name to opencv_ffmpeg246. I found the answer here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/17672734/2154827


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cv::Mat has a constructor where you can specify user data: Mat::Mat(int rows, int cols, int type, void* data, size_t step=AUTO_STEP) The documentation says the following about the data argument: Pointer to the user data. Matrix constructors that take data and step parameters do not allocate matrix data. Instead, they just initialize the matrix ...


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It depends on if you want to copy the data. From your suggestion, it seems you want to share the data. In that case, this is the best solution: cv::Mat mat(myImage.height_, myImage.width_, CV_8U, myImage.pPixel_); The mat will not release the memory when it is deallocated, you will have to do it. If you want to copy data, create a normal cv::Mat and do ...


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In your "warpAffine(frame,warped,Transform_avg,Size( frame.cols, frame.rows));" function, you must specify FLAG as WARP_INVERSE_MAP for stabilization. Sample code I have written: Mat src, prev, curr, rigid_mat, dst; VideoCapture cap("test_a3.avi"); while (1) { bool bSuccess = cap.read(src); if (!bSuccess) //if not success, break loop { ...


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Mat::create() allocates data (total()*elemSize() bytes) and initializes the internal reference counter of the allocated data to 1, (except when the Mat already existed and had the same size/type specified in the create() method). And yes, your code produces a memory leak since the data allocated by Mat::create() is lost when you move the Mat::data pointer. ...


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You can simply use Mat mat = Mat(myImage.height_, myImage.width_, CV_8UC1, myImage.pPixel_); In this way, no data is copied. And, of course, as the price, you should take care of releasing the memory. From its doc: [...] Instead, they just initialize the matrix header that points to the specified data, which means that no data is copied. This ...


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Generally, to extract homogenous regions, MSER (maximally stable extremal regions) is known to have worked well, it is widely used in OCR and the images you have shown also seem to have the same properties, homogenous color regions and then letters inside them. There is also an openCV implementation available for it. ...


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Largely depends on the compiler. Both gcc and clang do support "automatic vectorizing" in recent versions, but the quality of the generated code is very variable - mostly depending on the actual source code. As always, the compiler is firstly responsible for generating correct code, secondly to generate fast/efficient code. If in doubt, go for "safe" option. ...


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Here is something you can do: 1st) Calculate the joint histogram. use calcHist with the 3-channel image, instead of calculating one independent histogram for each channel. 2nd) look for the maximum in the joint histogram, just as you did with the channel histograms, using minMaxLoc. Now, it would be wonderful if we knew what color is assigned to each bin ...


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So you want to transform your object to minimum enclosing circle, Like in the below image transform reed rectangle to green circle. That is transform bounding rectangle to bounding circle. So do the following, Threshold the image Find contour and calculate bounding rect and minmum enclosing circle for contour. Mat src=imread("src.png"); Mat ...



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