Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

Matx has a function called get_minor() that does exactly what you want. I don't see it in documentation of OpenCV but it is present inside the implementation. In your case it will be: o = m.get_minor<3,3>(0,0); Template parameters <3,3> is the height and width of small matrix. Value (0,0) is the starting point from which the matrix is cropped.


3

It may be better to change double redIntensity = r / ((g + b) / 2); to double redIntensity = r / ((g+b+1) / 2); because g+b can be equal to 0, and you'll get NAN. Also take alook at cv::floodfill method.


2

Try this: cv::Mat heatmap(200,300,CV_8U,cv::Scalar(0)); { cv::Mat temp(200,300,CV_8U,cv::Scalar(0)); cv::Rect r(10,20,30,30); cv::rectangle(temp,r,cv::Scalar(100),-1); heatmap+=temp; } { cv::Mat temp(200,300,CV_8U,cv::Scalar(0)); cv::Rect r(20,25,30,30); ...


2

From the official OpenCV Documentation (check here), "Thickness of lines that make up the rectangle. Negative values, like CV_FILLED , mean that the function has to draw a filled rectangle." So give thickness a negative value like - rectangle(image, pt1, pt2, color, -1, 8, 0); UPDATE Use these lines in your code, for(int i=0; i < rect.size(); i++) ...


2

A convenient way is by the Sutherland-Hodgman polygon clipping algorithm. It works by clipping one of the polygons with the four supporting lines (half-planes) of the other. In the end you get the intersection polygon (at worst an octagon) and find its area by the polygon area formula. You'll make clipping easier by counter-rotating the polygons around ...


1

Just a slight modification to your code should work: static void draw_rectangles(Mat image, vector<Rect> faces) { cv::Mat heatmap(image.rows, image.cols, CV_8U,cv::Scalar(0)); for(int i = 0; i < faces.size(); i++) { cv::Mat temp = heatmat(faces[i]); // gives you a submatrix of your heatmap pointing at the location of your rectangle temp ...


1

I would consider sticking to integers: your weights are multiples of 1/64 so that working with fixed-point 8.6 is enough and that fits in 16 bits numbers. Bilinear interpolation is best done as three linear ones (two on Y then one on X; you can reuse the second Y interpolation for the neighboring patch). To perform a linear interpolation between two ...


1

I'm not 100% sure of what the code is doing since I'm not an OpenCV expert. However I can see that you are not initializing input in any way. This probably results in you not getting the descriptors you want, and thus not really doing anything. The code then probably breaks since it expects actual data in, but there is none. In general, when dealing with ...


1

why not use a simple constructor ? Matx44d m = ...; Mat33xd o( m(0), m(1), m(2), m(4), m(5), m(6), m(8), m(9), m(10) );



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible